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Flear - Tactimania - (Táctica para niños)

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GLENN FLEAR
TAI:TIMANIA
Find the Winning Combination
Quality Chess
www.qualitychess.co. uk
First English edition 20 1 1 by Quality Chess UK Ltd
First published in French by Olibris
Copyright © 20 1 1 Glenn Flear
TACTIMANIA
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored
in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,
electrostatic, magnetic tape, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior
permission of the publisher.
ISBN 978- 1 -9065 52-98-5
All sales or enquiries should be directed to Quality Chess UK Ltd,
20 Balvie Road, Milngavie, Glasgow G62 7TA, United Kingdom
Phone +44 1 4 1 227 677 1
e-mail: [email protected] uk
website: www. qualitychess.co.uk
Distributed in US and Canada by SCB Distributors, Gardena, California, US
www. scbdistriburors.com
Distributed in Rest of the World by Quality Chess UK Ltd through
Sunrise Handicrafts, Smyczkowa 4/98, 20-844 Lublin, Poland
Typeset by Jacob Aagaard
Edited by Colin McNab
Cover design and all illustrations by James Flear
Printed in Estonia by Tallinna Raamatutriikikoja LLC
C:antents
Introduction
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Characters
. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 1
Mate is in the Air!
Chapter 2
Tactics for Tyros
Chapter 3
Deviate to Dominate
Chapter4
On the Attack!
Chapter 5
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
Chapter 6
Punishing Precariously Placed Pieces
Chapter 7
Blunder-bashing
Chapter 8
Decisive Defence
Chapter 9
Excel in the Endgame!
. . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . ... . . . . . . . . ..
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . ... . . .
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. . . ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 10 Until the Bitter End!
Chapter 11 Tricky Decisions
. . . . ............. . .. . . . .. . . . .. . ..
. ... . ..... . . . . . . ........ . . . ... . . . . .... .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ..
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . .
Chapter 12 Chess is not an Easy Game
Chapter 13 The Tactimania Test
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .
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�1
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,vr.
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•
lntraductian
Tactimania simply means 'passion for tactics'.
If you enjoy chess, especially tactical chess, and you would
like to improve this aspect of your game, then Tactimania is for
you! Indeed, my main intention is to help the reader develop his
experience and 'gut-feeling' for tactics, by solving chess puzzles.
Chess can be great fun, bur also a learning experience and I hope
that you find this book of chess puzzles to be both. All players who
have already learned the moves and played a few friendly games
should be able to benefit. Experienced players will also find some
testing material towards the end of each chapter and especially in the
latter part of the book, so the book is aimed at j ust about everybody
in the chess world.
The game of chess is full of tactics which can be described as 'threats, opportunities and short-term
ideas that require calculation'. These merit particular attention if one wants to improve. Fortunately
tactical themes are a most delightful aspect of the game and one can learn whilst enjoying oneself,
that is, if the right sort of material is available.
I have relied on my own chess experiences in my search for less well-known examples. So the vast
majority of the positions are from my own games, with the remainder from my wife's.
In order to give a good idea of the level of difficulty, each puzzle is classified according to one of
the following three categories:
Apprentice
Advanced student
•
Expert
The chapters, especially the early ones, have definite themes, so this may help you focus your thoughts
and perhaps give you some clues in order to get going.
So whatever your playing strength, I suggest that you start at the beginning of each chapter and
then take it from there!
It is generally accepted that experienced players have a tendency to recognize patterns and themes
more readily. This ability then enables them to better navigate positions requiring tactical calculation.
So it follows that if you increase your exposure to positions requiring 'a combination', you will be
better armed to find the move that can make all the difference!
If you are not familiar with the terminology used in the tactical environment, don't despair, it will
become clear as you read through the chapters.
A final point before delving into the exercises. I personally find the use of colour or illustrations in a
chess book adds the icing to the cake, so I was enthusiastic about including both of these!
I hope you too appreciate the humour and creativity of the artist, James Flear, my eldest son. In
fact the book is a family effort all round, as my wife Christine has helped out with many aspects of
the book including the translation in the French edition.
Glenn Flear
Baillargues, France
March 20 1 1
•
The C:haracters
The Pawns
Courageous, they won't
hesitate to attack the noble
pieces. Remember they are
stronger when united! Their
ultimate aim is to reach the
far end of the chessboard to
magnify their powers.
The Kniqhts
With their unique L-shaped
leap, they avoid obstacles
and jump over defences.
Their weaving gallop can
daze and confuse!
The Bishops
By moving diagonally they
go where one least expects
them! Be careful about their
surprise slanted attacks!
•
The Characters
The Raaks
Don't underestimate their
brute force! They advance
in straight lines destroying
everything in their way.
Despite the predictability of
their assaults, they can cause
a great deal of damage.
The D.ueens
These amazons have learned
many attacking techniques
and wreak havoc in all
directions. Even if they
haven't fathomed the secret
of the knight's leap, they are
still the most powerful piece
of all.
The Kinqs
Always at the helm, however
long the battle rages. They
have absolute confidence in
their soldiers, who in return
will do everything in their
powers to protect them.
•
Are LJDU ReadLJ?
•
Lets &a!
Chapter One
I� �ll31!ilffit4/.:ml0
Checkmate is the principal objective of the game of chess, so it seems like a reasonable place to stan.
In this chapter, seeking a possible mate will never be far from our thoughts. So in each of the
puzzles that follow below, your aim will be to determine a way to dethrone the opposing monarch.
When we sit down at the board we dream of inflicting this ultimate punishment. However, for this
to become a reality, we often have to aim for and accumulate lesser advantages before launching
into a mating attack.
A player who exclusively aims for mate is not successful very often. In general, it is necessary for
him to place his pieces on active, then more aggressive squares, and perhaps win some material
along the way before turning his attention to Checkmate. Once the right conditions have been
achieved he can stan to calculate to see if a direct mate is possible.
It may help to bear in mind that each 'soft spot' in the opposing camp can be a tactical weakness,
and these can be fatal when concerning those defences near the king.
In each case you may find it useful to ask yourself the following question: How can I exploit any
vulnerability in the opposing team's defences?
You will soon note that each exercise is classified by a number of stars.
The early ones in the chapter have one star ( ) . These panicular puzzles will generally require
two or three moves of calculation .
•
Mate is in the Air!
Naturally, those puzzles denoted by (
) will require rather more attention. Either the
combination is longer, or perhaps involves more finesse.
In the more difficult cases, towards the end of the chapter denoted by (
) , you will often
need to weave a web to ensnare the opposing king. This may take longer and will generally involve
making a series of threats that ultimately leads to the creation of a mating net.
Before getting down to some serious solving, here are a couple of examples to demonstrate what
is expected and also, hopefully, to whet your appetite! Sometimes the mate is forced, as in the first
example:
8
G. Flear P. Genov
-
7
San Sebastian 2006
6
52J::g hst <;t>g6 53.'Wxd6t <;t>f7 54JU'8#
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
In other cases, with best play, the defender can actually avoid being mated, but nevertheless the
threats are sufficiently strong to give the attacking side a winning game.
K. Terrieux G. Flear
-
Guingamp 2008
28J�k7! �hb5
Mrer 28 . . . '\W xc7 2 9 . ttlxc7 mate is a long way
off, but Black is obviously in trouble.
Otherwise, 28. . . @ d8 resists a little longer:
29.E:fc l E:xb5 (29 . . . E:xb3 30.E:c8t @ e7
3 l .E:l c7 E:b2t 3 2 . @ f3 E:b3 t 3 3 . @ g4 and
Black is in a mating net) 30.E:c8t @ e7
3 l . axb5 E:h2t 32 /.t>g l E:b2 3 3 .E: l c7 'Wxc7
(to avoid the mate following Wf6t) 34. E:xc7
@ d8, but White is clearly winning.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
29.'Wf6t
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
The knight is pinned.
29 <;t>es 30J3c8t
•.•
And mate next move.
1-0
•
Are LJDU
reaiiLJ
readLJ?
•
�
Exercises
1 -4
1-1
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1 -5
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1 -6
1 -3
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a
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•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1 - 1 G. Flear - R. Borchert
1-4 M. Burgess - G. Flear
Griesbach-im-Ronal 1 983
Uppingham 1 987
25.'1Mle8t :axeS 26.:axe8#
1-2 B. Mallet - G. Flear
34 .. J!xh2! 35.J.x£3
Or 3 5 . @ xh2 'IM!h3t 36. c;!;>g 1 '1Mlh 1 #.
35 .. J'�� h 1 t 36.';!{xg2 '1Mfh3#
Avoine 1 98 5
1-5 G. Flear - A. Jurkovic
2 7. . .'1Mlxg3t 28.hxg3 :ah 1#
1-3 Z. Slapak - G. Flear
Cappelle-la-Grande 1 986
Eichgraben 1 987
43.h4t @g4 44.lbf6#
1-6 G. Forintos - G. Flear
22 ...'1Wxa2t [email protected] :aast 24.ci>b1 :aa1#
Lille 1 98 5
3 9. . .:ag3t 40.hxg3 '1Wxg3t 4L:ag2 '1Wxg2#
•
Mate is in the Air!
1 -7
�
1- 1 0
8
8
7
6
5
4
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3
3
2
2
•
a
1 -8
b
c
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•
0
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a
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a
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2
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1 -9
•
1 -1 2
8
8
7
7
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4
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3
3
2
•
b
1- 1 1
8
0
a
2
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c
d
e
f
g
h
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1-7 R. Kasimdzhanov - C. Flear
1-10 G. Flear - M. Vanderbeeken
Bastia 1 997
Calvia 2006
33 ...�d1 t 34.E:xd1 E:xd1#
5 Le4
With the threat of E:cg l mating.
1-8 G. Flear - J. Swindells
British League 20 1 0
27.E:f8t <j;>h7
If 27 . . . �xf8 chen 28. Wlg8#.
5L .. h5 52.E:cg1 t <j;>h6 53.E:g6t <j;>h7
54.E:xh5#
1 - 1 1 C. Flear - P.. Tregubov
Bastia 1 997
28.Wfg6#
29 ... E:h4t! 30.gxh4
1-9 D. Gelis - G. Flear
Perpignan 2004
Or 30. <j;>g2 ctJe3t 3 1 . cj;lg 1 Wlg2#.
30 ... c!Df4t 3 1 .<j;>g3 �g2#
1 - 1 2 G. Flear - J. Thynne
Clermont-Ferrand 1 986
32.E:xc8 �xeS 33.E:d8 �c7 34.E:xe8! :!he8
35.�xg7#
•
Mate is in the Air!
1-13
�
1-16
8
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7
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•
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1-14
0
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1-17
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1 -1 8
1-1 s
•
•
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2
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0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1-13 C. Bernard - G. Flear
1-17 E. Pandavos - G. Flear
Cap d'Agde 2006
Kecskemet 1 982
28 ... f2!
Instead 28 . . . !'lxh2t 29. <;t>g i �xd4t 30.�xd4
!'lh4 was played in the game. Black was better
but the fight was far from over.
29.�xd5
29.ixg2 fl =�t 30. !'lxfl �xg2#.
29 .. J3gl#
16 ...i.f4! 17.�xg4
This offers White little hope, bur at least he
can struggle on a while longer.
Otherwise, there is 1 7. � xf4 �h 1 # and
1 7 . !'lxf4 �h i t 1 8 . <;t>e2 ixf3t 1 9 . <;t>xf3
�xc l -+.
17 ...�xg4 18.6 �h4 19. i.xf4 d5 20.hd5 cxd5
2l.:gd4 �hit 22.<;iJ£2 :gfe8 23.i.d2 :ge6 0-1
1-14 F. Tanguy - G. Flear
St Affrique 2000
1 - 1 8 C. Flear - E. Bricard
Cannes 1 988
19 ... liJh4! 20.liJf4 �xf4! 2 LliJxh4 �xh4!
22.gxh4 �xh2#
27.d7! ixd7 28.�a8t i.£8 29.ie7!
Mate is unavoidable.
1 - 1 5 I. Kour kanakis - G. Flear
Heraklion 1 984
34 ... �hl t! 35.ixh l �h3t! 36.�xh3 �xh l t
37.�g4 f5t 38.�f4 �e4#
1 - 1 6 G. Flear - G. Blum
Eppstein 1 984
27.�dxh7! if5
If 27 . . . !'lxf2 then 28 .�h8t <;t>f7 29. !'l l h7#.
28.�h8t
Even quicker is 2 8 . tt:l xc7! .
2 8. . .� f7 29.:g l h7t �e6 30.gxf5t gxf5
3 1 .:gh6t �d5
Or 3 I . . . <;t>d7 32. !'!8h7t <;t>d8 3 3 .�d4t etc.
32.�d4#
•
1-0
Mare is in the Air!
1-19
�
1 -22
••
8
7
7
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1 -23
1 -20
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0
1 -24
1 -2 1
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0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1 - 1 9 J. Plachetka - C. Flear
1-22 G. Flear - E. Neiman
Sr Vincent 2002
Paris 1 983
28J:&xe6! fxe6 29.\Wf7t �h8 30.'1'9g6 c!L'le4
3 1 .'1'Hxe4 �g8 32.'1'Hxe6t �h8 33.llJ f7t �g8
34.c!L'lxh6t �h8 35.'\Wgst gxg8 36.llJf7#
44.g3!
Sometimes the solution is a quiet move!
44 ... llJf3t 45.�h1 gh6 46.Wfd3t �£2
47.gfl#
1-20 C. Flear - M. Petursson
Berne 1 99 1
1-23 G. Flear - M. Surtees
Liverpool 2008
29 ...'\WcS!
Changing direction!
30.ge1
Or 30.�b 1 �d2, and if 3 1 .lt:la2, then
3 1 . . . lt:le2t 32.Wfl �h3#.
35 ..ixh7!
It seems that 3 5 . :1'i:gfl also forces mate, bur
this is the most efficient.
35 ...gxh7 36.gxf8t c!L'lxf8 37.'1'9xf8#
30 \Wh3 0-1
.•.
1 -24 G. Flear - P.Y. Schmitt
1-21 P. Nabavi - G. Flear
Montpellier 2007
Chamalieres 2007
22.gxe6t! fxe6 23.Wfxg6t
43 ... ge2t
Double check!
44.�h3 '1'Hd3t
More precise is 44 . . . �e6t 4 5 . Wg3 �e3t
46.Wg4 h5#.
45.�g4
Or 4 5 .�g3 �f5 t 46.�g4 �e3t etc.
45 ... gg2t 46.�f4 Wff5#
•
Even better is 23.:1'i:xe6t! Wd8 24.�a5t Wc8
2 5 .�d6, for example 2 5 . . . �b5 26.�d8t �xd8
27.�c7#.
23 ... <i>f8 24.gxe6 Wfh7
The queen is pinned, but this doesn't hold
White back.
25 ..ib4 t! gxb4 26.ge8#
Mate is in the Air!
1- 25
�
1-28
8
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•
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a
1 -29
1 - 26
c
d
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b
••
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1 -30
1 -27
•
0
*
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0
a
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1-25 A. Adorjan - G. Flear
1-28 B. Abramovic - G. Flear
Szirak 1 986
Hastings 1 984/5
32 ...Wg3! 33.dxe4 E':d2 34.�g8t @h8!
36 .. J3d2!
A counter-attack!
37.�a6
Dodging and weaving!
Not 34 . . . Wxg8 ? because of 3 5 .'Wf7t �h7
The only way to keep the game alive is
37.f4 li:lxf4 38 . .ixc6 .ixc6 39.l' hc6t Wf5
40.Ek5t Wg6, but Black takes possession of
the kingside.
36.'Wf5 t Wg8 37.'We6t �h8 3 8 . li:lg6t and
White manages to draw.
37... liJf4 38.ifl
0-1
35.l!Jf7t @xgs 36.We8t @h7 37.Wfh8t @g6
There is no perpetual check, so . . .
This avoids the mate on g2 . . .
1 -29 G. Flear - G. Andruet
38 ... liJh5#
Bagneux 1 98 5
. . . but not this one!
1-26 D. Leygue - G. Flear
Cap d'Agde 2006
25 .. Jhg4t! 26.hxg4 Wfxg4t [email protected]
27.Wh2 loses to 27 . . . E!h5 t 28 .'Wh4 E':xh4t
29 .�xh4 \1t/xh4t etc.
27 J:!dlt! 28J�xd1 �c4t [email protected] Wfe2#
.•
44.e5!
Supporting the knight o n f6 i s a key element
in the mating net.
Instead 44.li:lg6t ? is premature as Black can
then escape with 44 . . . �g7.
44 ... dxe5 45.fxe5 E':h3 46.liJg6t liJxg6
If 46 . . . Wg7 then 47.li:lxe7t .
47.E':xg6 E':xh2t [email protected] E':g2 49 ..ig4
1-27 D. Bryson - G. Flear
Edinburgh 1 98 5
Mate on g8 is unstoppable.
1-0
1-30 T. Manouck - G. Flear
4 1 . ..Wih2!
26.Wfxe4!
h4 45 . .ixf5 li:lxf5 46.'Wb7t Wf6 47.'Wb6t Wg5
48.gxh4t I couldn't quite win.
26 ... E!xe4 27.E':d8t Wf8 28.E':aa8!
42.f6t @h7 43.�b5
Or 43.f7 'Wg 1 t 44.'Wfl 'We3t 45 .'We2
'Wxe2#.
43 E!xb5 44.f7
.•.
In fact 44.'Wf4 resists a little longer: 44 . . . E!f5 !
(prettiest) 45 .'Wc7t li:lf7 46.'Wxf7t Wh6
47.'Wf8t Wg5 48.E':d3 'Wg2 and White can
resign.
44 E':b2! 45.f8=W
..•
45.f8=li:lt isn't much better due to 45 . . . Wg8! .
45 Wg1 t 46.Wfl We3t 47.We2 Wxe2#
•..
•
St Chely d'Aubrac 200 1
The threat to go to e3 via g 1 paralyses White.
Unfortunately, I played the inferior 41 . . . gxf5 ?
and after 42.E':d2 E!b 1 t 43.E!d 1 E!xd 1 t 44. Wxd 1
The weakness of the back rank is exposed.
The eighth rank pressure is overwhelming.
In the game, under serious time pressure,
White continued with the inferior 28J''1x f8t?
Wxf8 29.li:ld6 E!be7! 30.li:lxe4 E':xe4 3 1 .E':c l
E!e2 and Black then had the advantage and
went on to win.
28 ... g6
Relatively better than 28 . . . 'Wxd8? 29.E':xd8t.
29.:!!xf8t @g7 30.liJd6 E':e1 t 3 1 [email protected]
White emerges with a clear extra piece.
Mate is in the Air!
1 -34
1 -3 1
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•
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Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1 -3 1 C. Flear - I. Erneste
1 -33 G. Flear - A. Rawlinson
Debrecen 1 992
British League 20 1 0
38.ghf8!
30 ... £5!
White wastes no time in targeting the
vulnerability of Black's king.
My opponent had noticed the weakness of
my first rank.
38 ... c4 39.Wig2!
3 l .Wih4
The king is surrounded.
39 ... cxb3 40.gf7t 'it>e6 41 .W/h3t ttlg4
42.Wfxg4#
1 -32 G. Flear - T. Gouret
Le Havre 1 989
Here 3 l .exf5 ? fails to 3 1 . . .1'!xd 5 ! 32.1'!xd5
Wfl #.
3 l ...fxe4 32.Wfxe4
32.fxe4? allows mate i n two: 32 . . . '\W fl t
33.1'!xfl !!xfl #.
32 ... gf4!
The rook is taboo.
27.g4t!
The only good continuation.
27 i.xg4 28Jhg4! 'it>xg4 29.W/xg6t 'it>h3
30.Wig2t 'it>xh4 3 l .'it>f2!
..•
Stepping aside to allow the rook to join the
attack.
3 1 ...Le3t 32.'it>f.3
The threat of !!h 1 t is too strong.
32 ...W/xf6t 33.i.xf6t 'it>h5 34.gh 1#
•
33.W/e2
There are several alternatives:
1 ) 33.'Llxf4? !!xd 1 t and mate.
2) 3 3 . '&xe5 ? !!d4 34.1'!bb 1 1'!8xd5 and Black
wins a piece.
3) 33 .'&e 1 !!d4! 34.'Lle3 1'!xd 1 3 5 . 'Llxd 1 '&d3
36.'Llf2 '1Wc3 37.'1Wb 1 ixf2 3 8 .1'!xf2 1'!d3 ,
and if 39.1'!b2 then 39 . . . '1Wxb2!.
4) 3 3 .'1Wb 1 ! (the lesser evil) 33 ... 1'!d4 34.1'!xd4
ixd4 3 5 . 'Llc7 '1Wc6 36.1'!c2 ic3 37.'Llb5 e4
3 8 . fxe4 Wxe4 39.1'!c l '1We2 and Black has
great pressure, but White has some hope of
resisting .
Mate is in the Air!
33 .. .'1Wxe2 34Jhe2 gd4! 35Jhd4 ixd4
1-35 G. Buckley - G. Fleac
The knight doesn't have a decent square.
Liverpool 2008
36.�e7
After 36.tt:le3 simply 36 ...Le3 37.1'he3 l'!d 1 t.
If instead 36.tt:lc7 ib6, there would be
two strong threats: capturing the knight and
mating along the first rank.
36 ...ic5 37.g3
49.i>d4! ghd2 50.i>c5! gxd3 5 1 .ci>b6
Mate is forced.
1-0
1-36 L. Basora Pascual - G. Fleac
37J'l:xe5 Ei:d 1 t .
Port Barca res 20 1 0
37...ixe7 38.gxe5 if6
. . . and Black has a winning position.
39J':ha5 gd3 40.E!b5 E!xb3 41 .a5 i.c3 42.a6
ga3 43.:Sb6 b3 44.a7 b2 0-1
1-34 J. Marciano - G. Fleac
Lanes 2009
24 ...ixflt!
The weakness of White's first rank is more
important than his threat of mate!
29 ... .!be5t!
A far from evident way of forcing mate.
In the game, I took longer to win: 29 . . . tt:le7
30.ixf7 Ei:h4 t 3 1 . <i>f3 Ei:f4 t (more precise
was 3 1 . . .\Wf4t! 32.<i>e2 \Wxe4t 33.<i>d2 Ei:h2t
34.\t>c l \Wf4t 3 5 .<i>b 1 \Wf2) 32.<i>e3 \Wf2t
33.i>d3 l'!f3t 34.i>c4 \Wxb2! and the mating
threats were too strong. 0- 1
30.dxe5 dxe5 31 .Wi'fl gg3t! 32.:Sxg3 %th5#
25.i>h1
After 2 5 .Ei:xf2 Ei:xc l t 26.ixc l lt:l f6 Black has
two threats: The queen as well as . . . Ei:d 1 t .
25 ... £5 26.%txg7t?
26.Ei:xc8 (the most robust) 26 . . . Ei:xc8
27Y!lg6 (there aren't any better squares for the
queen) 27 . . . tt:l f4 28.\Wxg7t \Wxg7 29 .ixg7
<i>xg7 30.Ei:xf2 Ei:c l t 3 1 .tt:lg 1 e5 and, with
the pin along the first rank, White has great
difficulties.
Otherwise, 26.\Wg6 is well met by 26 . . . tt:lf4
which transposes if 27 .Ei:xc8.
26.. .'1Wxg7 27.ixg7 E!xcl 28.:Sxcl i>xg7
And White had lost a piece.
0-1
•
Pins, forks, skewers, double checks
and discovered checks.
In this chapter, I will be asking you to make use of the most common tactical themes in solving
the puzzles. Hopefully, you should then gain confidence in exploiting opportunities using these
standard tactical ideas in your own games.
Before you turn the page in order to start solving, here are some definitions to help you get to grips
with the most widely employed tactical terms in chess literature.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A check: An immediate attack on the opposing king.
A pin: A piece or a pawn is immobilized because it shields an attack against a
valuable unit or key square.
A fork: Two or more pieces (or pawns) are simultaneously attacked by the same
piece (or pawn) .
A skewer: A threat against a piece, which can move, but only a t the cost o f
enabling a further threat against a more distant piece along the same rank o r file.
A discovered attack: A piece {or a pawn) makes a move thus enabling an
attack from another piece that was otherwise hidden.
A discovered check: A specific case of a discovered attack, but against the king.
Double check: This combines giving a check, from one unit, with a discovered
check from a second piece.
X-ray attack: An indirect attack from a distant piece.
These themes should become easier to understand when applied to some specific examples .
•
Tactics for Tyros
We'll start with a pin.
G. Flear - J. Sugden
London 1 98 5
Black played . . .
44 \We8!
. . . which pins the white queen. The
endgame should then be a comfortable win
for Black . . .
.•.
45.\Wc6 h 4 46.<ita5
Unpinning, but White has lost valuable
time.
•
46 .. JWd8t
0-1
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If 47.i>xa6 h3 48 .'1Wb7 i>g8! , the pawn
cannot be held back as 49.'1Wb 1 loses to
49 . . . '1Wa8t 50.Wb6 'Wb8t , when White has
to move his king and thus loses the queen.
This last tactical point illustrates a skewer.
V. Hort- G. Flear
Metz 1 984
White has a dominant position and finished
off the game with . . .
35J�c7! 1-0
I resigned because of a deadly fork. . .
35 '1Wxc7 36.liJfe8t
•..
Then . . .
36. . J�he8
. . . doesn't help as White forks again with . .
.
0
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37.lilxe8t
. . . which attacks both the king and queen at
the same time.
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
R. Seppeur - G. Flear
German League 1 983
Black won material with . .
.
33 ....L:e4! 34Jhe4 f5!
A fork of the rook and bishop by the
f-pawn, with a pin of the e-pawn along the
e-file. The point being that 3 5 .exf6 fails to
3 5 . . . l!xe4.
35 ..txf5 gxf5 36.\Wx£5 �f8
White has problems due to his material
deficit.
37.�g4 i.e7 38.d5 !!f2 39.'11Ng3 Wff8 40.d6
cxd6 4 1 .l!ed4 l!xa2 42.exd6 i.f6 43.�d5
l!e2 44.d7 l!xd7!
•
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This sacrifice deflects the white rook from
its defence of the e5-square. See Chapter
Three for more examples of this theme.
45.l!xd7 i.e5
A pin rather than a skewer, but in any case
it proves to be decisive!
46J�d8
The tame finish was 46.�xe5 t ? !!xe5 0 l .
-
46 ...hg3t 47.C.t>xg3 �e8
Unpinning and winning!
L. Roos - G. Flear
Paris 2007
36.ltlxf5 �xf5 37.ltlg6t!
A discovered attack against the black
queen. Note the skewer along the f-file, which
works because the black rook is insufficiently
defended.
37... hxg6
37 . . . �xg6 isn't great either after 38.�xf7.
38.�xf7
0
This capture follows on from an X-ray
attack. The white queen is able to get away
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with capturing on f7 because it is defended
by the rook on fl .
38 ...\We4 39.'11Nf4 Wfe6 40.\Wh4t @gs
41.�el \Wd7 42.\We7 Wfxe7 43.l!xe7 @f8
44J�d7 1-0
Naw LjDU knaw what LjDU are laakinq far.
Sa•••readl.j. steadl.j. qa!
•
�
Exercises
2-1
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Glenn Flear
2- 1 E. Kieser - G. Flear
Lugano 1 984
Tactimania
30J::1h8 �g4 3 l .f3 �a4 32.b4 �a2 33.�h5
�c2 34.i.e1 �c4 0-1
2 l ...c5!
2-4 M. Santo-Roman - G. Flear
The rook is attacked and doesn't have any
good squares, largely due to the skewer on the
c3-knighr. The d-pawn is pinned.
22.�xb2
Lille 1 98 5
32 .. J:1xf5!
Black snatches an important pawn .
Alternatively, 22.dxc6 �xd4 and 22.l'!d2
�xc3 are also hopeless.
22 ... cxd4 23.ltJe4 '!Wc8 24.'1Wxb6 ixfl
25.i.xd4 ia6 26.ixg7t �xg7 27.'1Wd4t
�g8 28.d6 '!Wcl t 0-1
2-2 G. Flear - H. Grooten
Copenhagen 1 983
22 ...ie2!
Forking the queen and rook. White cannot
capture the bishop due to mate on h2.
23.'1Wd7
23.tt:lxe2 �xh2#.
23 ...ixfl 24.'1Wxd6 �e1! 25.�xfl '!Wc4 0-1
33.'1We6
Rather
fDxh6t.
than
33.gxf5 ?
tt:lxf5 t
34.\!?g4
33 ... �e4t 34.�h4 �xf4
Another one bites the dust!
35.'1Wc8t �g7 36.'1Wxb7 �e7 37.'1Wxc7 �f7
38.'1We5t �f6 39.�g3
39.g5 ?? tt:J g6t.
39... �g6 40.'!Wd4 @gs 41.'1Wb4 �e4t 42.�h3
�f3t [email protected] �flt 44.�gl �h4 45.\Wbst
�f7 46.'1Wxa7t �f6 47.'1Wb6t �g5 48.\Wdst
@xg4 49.�g8t �f4 50.\Wffit �f5 5l .c3 �e3
52.b4 �e2 53.'1Wa8 �e3
With a mating net.
0-1
The minor pieces are pinned and White is
faced with heavy losses.
2-5 G. Flear - J.Y. Soyer
Champigny 1 984
2-3 F. Samara - G. Flear
Clermont-Ferrand 1 98 5
22.'1We6t �h8 23.'1Wxc6!
White wins a piece with a 'discovered attack' .
One had to find the best fork!
23 ...'1Wxc6 24.�xd8t ixd8 25.i.xc6 1-0
25 ...i.xd5
If 2 5 . . . c6? , then plausible is 26.�f3 ! ? when
White uses a pin to avoid any problems, for
example after 26 . . . cxb 5 then 27.�xb7.
However, even stronger is 26.�xf7! with
some advantage.
26.�xd5 �c6!
Also possible is 26 . . . <j;le6.
27Jhe5
Or 27.c4 tt:lxc4 2 8 . tt:lc3 l'!g4 29.g3 l'!d4,
when White has little hope.
27 ... �xb5 28.�xh5 �d6 29.�fl �d7
•
2-6 G. Flear - M. Fierro Baquero
Wroxham 2002
26.�xg6t!
Winning material due to some neat tactics.
26 ... �£8
Or 26 . . . fxg6 27. tt:J f6t with a decisive fork.
27J:!g8t! �e7
If 27 . . . <j;lxg8, White still has 28.fDf6t .
28.�xd8 �xd8 29.'1Wxd5t �xd5 30.�xc5
White will surely win the endgame .
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
2-7 E. Prie - C. Flear
2- 10 S. Cullip - G. Flear
Narbonne-plage 2002
Leicester 1 988
Black should use a pin along the long diagonal
in order to win a pawn.
47 ...ie3!
42 ... £5!
48.ge1
With an advantage that borders on the
decisive.
In the game, Black continued with the
inferior 42 . . . h 5 ? 43.Wg3 Wc8 44.�h2 Wc6
4 5 . �g3 Wc8 46.�h2 and the game ended in
a draw.
Threatening both rooks.
Or 48.fxe3 Wxe3t 49.�g2 Wxc l .
48 ...ixf2t 49.gxf2 �xe1 t 50.�g2 ge2
5 1J he2 �xe2t 52.�g1 �e5 53.�g2 c!bd6
54.�d8 c!bf5 55.�d7t �b6 56.�d8t �c5
57.�f8t �d4 0-1
2- 1 1 G. Flear - J. Van Mil
2-8 T. Upton - G. Flear
Ostend 1 988
London 1 982
2 1 .ltlxb5!
30J3xd6t! gxd6 3 1 .gxd6t �xd6 32 ..if4t
A skewer that wins immediately.
1-0
A neat pseudo-sacrifice that wins a pawn for
starters, with more in the offing.
2 l ...dxe5
2-9 G. Flear - E. Grassi
Pau 1 988
If 2 l . . .cxb5 then 22.Wxc8 t , whereas after
2 I . . .d5 22.lhd5 ! tt:la6 23.1:!d6 the pins would
cause further damage!
22.c!bd6 gffi 23.�c4t �h8 24.c!bf7t gxf7
13.c!bxa5! gxa5 14.b4
The fork enables White to win a pawn .
25.�xf7 c!ba6 26.gd7 gg8 27.ic4 1-0
14 ... ga6
If 1 4 . . . �xb4,
1 5 .�xb4.
Naturally if 24 . . . �g8 , White mates with
2 5 . <ilh6t Wh8 26.Wg8t !!xg8 27.<ilf7#.
White forks
again with
2- 12 C. Gervais - G. Flear
Le Havre 1 989
1 5.bxc5
White has emerged a pawn to the good.
15 ... gc6?! 16 ..ih4 e5?! 17.c!bg5 g6?!
Black sheds further material.
1 8.ixc6 bxc6 19.c!be4 c!bd5 20.id2 ia6
2 1 .i.h6 ges 22.gfd1 �aS 23J3ad �aS
24.c!bd6 c!bf8 25.e4 c!bc7 26.id2 1-0
24 ... c4!
Attacking the bishop which must move, bur
then after. . .
25.ic2
. . . the queen is no longer defended, so . . .
25 ... c!bf4!
.. .is then possible using a pin to fork. If
then . . .
26.exf4 �xe2 27.ge1
... Black has, at the very minimum, . . .
27. . .�xe1 t 28.c!bxe1 d4 0-1
. . . with an exchange to the good plus the
initiative .
•
Tactics for Tyros
2- 1 3
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•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
2- 13 G. Kourtesis - G. Flear
2- 17 M. Huerga Leache - G. Flear
Athens 1 989
Spanish League 2004
3 1 ..J�xe5!
30 ... tlJxd4! 3 1 .�xd4 d5
The pawn is pinned.
32.fxe5 Wfxfl t 0-1
The pin along the e-file is very strong.
32 ..ifl
If 32 . .id3 ? chen 32 . . . c5.
2- 14 G. Flear - N. McDonald
Souchend 2007
White has a fork with . . .
62.tLle5t! �g7 63.tLl d3
32 ... dxe4
Black wins a pawn as White cannot recapture
under reasonable circumstances.
33.� e2
33.�dxe4 Ei:xe4 34.Ei:xe4 allows 34 . . . -ixc l .
. . . and Black loses a piece. I was chen able to
ultimately convert my advantage . . .
33 ... e3!
63 .. J��d1 64.tlJxc5 �d2 65.�a1 e2 66.�el
�g6 67.a5 d3 6S.tlJxd3 �a2 69.�g1 �a4t
70.�e3 �haS 71.tlJf4t! �f5 72.tLlxe2 �a3t
73.�f2 �a2 74.g6 �aS 75.�e3 �eSt 76.�f3
�aS 77.g7 �gS 7S.tlJf4 �e5 79.tLlh5 �f5
SO.�g2 �e6 S l .�f4 �f7 S2.�g5 1-0
34.f3 c5 35.�c4 .if8 36.�g3 f5 37.c3 .id6
3S.�h2 ia6 39.cxb4 cxb4 40.�c2 .ixf1
41 .�xfl g5 42.�c4 .ib8 43.h4 e2 44.�e1
gxh4 0-1
The advantage rapidly becomes decisive.
2- 1 S G. Flear - J. Ivanov
San Sebastian 2006
2- 1 5 D. Van Heirzeele - G. Flear
Montpellier 2008
2S ... tLlxb2!
The knight threatens three things at once,
and consequently Black drops a pawn.
A pretty fork which destroys White's king
defences.
29 ....ic6 30.t!Jxf5 �f7 3 1 .f4 �f6 32.t!J e3
�e6 33. �f2 ib5
29.�xb2
White is now ready for a general advance on
the kingside.
Or 29.Ei:xd7 lt:lxc4.
29 ... �xd1
The knight is of course pinned.
30 ..ixh6 .ixc3t 0-1
2- 16 A. Mirzoev - G. Flear
Elgoibar 2004
39.�g4!
A pin that wins on che spot! If 39 . . . lt:lxg4
simply 40 .Wxg5 t .
1-0
•
27.�f7t! �gS 2S.�xeSt .ixeS 29.t!Jd6
34.f5t �d6 35.�f3 .id3 36.�f4 a5 37.g4
.ib 1 3S.a3 .id3 39.g5 b6 40.h4 ie4 41 .h5
h6 42.g6
The threat of lt:lg4 followed by f5-f6 is very
strong.
1-0
1 y ros
Tactics for 'T:
2-2 1
2-1 9
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1
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
2- 19 L. Goldgewicht - G. Flear
2-2 1 G. Flear - P. Walden
French League 1 999
Exeter 1 983
34 ... �h3t!
34.. Jhe6!
The rook is untouchable due to mate on b2.
White's rook is overloaded.
35.�£2
35.�xf6t
3 5 .�xe6? �xb2#.
35 ... �xf6 36J�d1 �e5
Otherwise 3 5 .l"lxh3 lLlxe2t 36.�f3 tLl xc l .
35 ... ttlxe2 36.�xe2 �xg4t 0-1
The rook ending is advantageous to Black.
37.bxa3 hxa3 38J'!d3 �a6 39.�c2 d4
40.�d2 h5 4I .h4 �f4 42.�xd4t �xf3
43.�e1 �g3 44.�e4 �h3 45.�£2 �c6
46.�e3t �xh4 47.�xa3 �c2t 48.�g1 g5
49.�a4t g4 50.�a5 g3 5 1 .a4 �a2 0-1
2-20 G. Flear - E. Tangborn
2-22 G. Flear - M. Gurevich
Tel Aviv 1 989
24 ... ttle3!
A discovered attack with three threats: The
queen, the rook and mate on g2 .
0-1
Luxembourg 1 9 88
2-23 G. Flear - S. Buckley
British League 20 1 0
43.�xd6! �xd6
Or 43 . . . �e7 44.l"lg6t �h4 4 5 . tLl xf5 t ttJ xf5
46.�xg4#.
44.�xd6 �xd6 45.ttl ce4t 1-0
34.tLl de7t!
In the game, 34.�d4? tLl g6 3 5 . f4 �c5 was
far less convincing.
34... �h8 35.�d4
Attacking both knights .
•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
2-24 A. Stubbe - G. Flear
2-26 G. Flear - S. Walker
Narbonne-plage 20 1 0
Hastings 1 986
20Jhh7t!
22 ... lLl d3
Simplest.
Exposing the king to a fatal double check.
23.�£3 �xe4! 24.�xe4 lLJxf2t 2S.'iflg1 lLlxe4
0-1
20 ... i>xh7 2 1 .lLlf6t
A double check always requires a king
move in reply.
2-25 G. Flear - H. Kunas
2 L .. i>h8 22.�g5!
Montpellier 1 98 5
Mate is imminent.
22 ...�xf6
There is no defence with 22 . . . gxf6
23.�h6t i'g8 24.'Mrh7#, nor by 22 . . .Ehg4t
23 .'Mrxg4 gxf6 24.Wh5 t �g8 2 5 .Wh7#.
35.hg6!
The h-pawn is, in effect, pinned!
35 .. .l�!c7
Not 35 . . . hxg6?
37.'Mrh7#.
due
to
36.'Mrh3t
i'g8
23.exf6 1-0
And again!
36.l3xc7 �xc7 37.i.e4
2-27 G. Flear - K. Arkell
Now, with a damaged kingside, Black cannot
resist indefinitely.
Hastings 1 986
37 ... b6 38.i.d5 �d8 39.h4 ges 40.�£5 �e7
4 l .b5 �g7 42.<�h2!
19.lLlh5!
A golden rule when the opponent can only
wait is to . . . take your time!
19 ... lLlxd5
42 ...�e7 43.i>h3 �g7 44.g3 �e7 45.a3
�g7 46.lLl d4 �e7 47.lLl e6 gbs 48.g4 ggs
49.g5 fxg5 50.hxg5 gg6 5 l .�e4 1-0
The check on d4 next move is devastating.
A double pin!
If 1 9 . . . lt:lxh5 then 20.1Mfxe7.
20.�xe7 lLlxe7 2 l .lLJf6t i>g7 22.lLld7
Fork!
22 ... gxb5 23.axb5 gds 24.bxa6 gxd7
25J'�h3 lLlc6 26.gb3 i>f6 27.gb6 lLl d4
28.gd3 1-0
The a-pawn will decide matters .
•
Tactics for Tyros
2-29
2-28
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Glenn Flear
2-28 R. Vaganian - G. Flear
London 1 986
20 ... b5!
Suddenly, it becomes evident that the white
rooks are badly placed. The rook on c2, for
instance, can neither move nor be defended, so
White is faced with a loss of material!
Following 22.e5!? �xe5! 23.dxe5 bxc3
24.:gxc3 lt::l xe5 2 5 .�e2 :gxc3 26.:gxc3 lt::l c4
Black has a clear extra pawn, bur with White
having two bishops for two knights he would
have practical chances to hold the game.
:gxcl t
There are significant problems in trying to
press home the advantage. This is due to the
fact that White has a couple of pawns, the
centre and a bishop pair, which represent
partial compensation for the piece.
26 ...ia7 27.ie3 �c7 28 ..ic4 lLl b6 29.ib3
�bd5 30.i>e2 �xe3 3 l .fxe3 � e6 32.h4
g6 33.'it>d3 �g7 34.a5 �f5 35.i.c4 i.b8!
36.h5 i.e? 37.hxg6 hxg6 38.i.xa6 i.xa5
39.d5 i.b6 40.d6t i>f8 4l .e4 �d4 42.i>c4
�f3 43.i>xb4 .id4 44.e6 f:xe6 45.b3 �xg5
46.i>b5 �xe4 47.i>c6 .ie5 48.ic4 hd6
49.J.d3 �c5 50.hg6 i>e7
Black only has one pawn remaining, but it's
sufficient.
5 l .b4 � d7 52.i>b5 ig3 53�e4 .ifl
54.�c6 � b6 55.b5 id4 56 ..ic2 e5 57.ib l
i>f6 58. i>d6
White can only temporize while Black
gradually makes progress.
58 ... 'it>g5 59.i>e6 i>f4 60.i.c2 e4 6l .i.dl
ic5 0-1
Evidently, in order to convert this advantage
it is necessary to know the winning technique
in the pawnless endgame of Bishop and Knight
against bare king. In fact I insist that my
students learn it because it is an ideal exercise
•
in handling the coordination of one's forces in
general, as well as its evident practical value.
So I suggest that you make an effort to do the
same.
This result is in fact my best ever performance
(so far!) as my opponent was rated fourth in
the world at the time.
2-29 G. Flear - K.H. Podzielny
2 1 .e4 b4 22.<!Dxd5t
22 ... exd5 23Jhc7 :gxc7 24.e5
25.ixcl ib8 26.hd5
Tactimania
Le Touquet 1 987
2 1 .lLlxc5!
Exploiting an apparent vulnerability along
the a l -h8 diagonal. For the record, note that
2 l .�xh5 �xh5 22.lt::l xd6! �xd6 23.:gxe5 �xe5
24.�c3 is similar.
2 l ..Ji�g8
If 2 l . . . dxc5, then White continues with
22 .�xh5 :gf5 (if 22 . . . �xh5 then 23.:gxe5 �xe5
24.�c3) 23 .�g4 :gg5 24.�xf4 :gxg4 2 5 .�xe5t
and thus obtains two extra pawns.
22.if3 ig6 23.Lh5 ixh5 24.ixf4
Here again White picks off a couple of pawns
and even has the safer king.
24 .. J:!af8 25.ixe5t dxe5 26.Wfc3 i.f3 27.g3
gf5 28.�d3 ixd5 29.!he5 gxe5 30.�xe5
Wff6 3 U :!dl ixa2 32.gd6! �g7
32 . . . �xd6 33.lt::l f7#.
33.gd7 1-0
Tactics for Tyros
2- 32
2-30
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Glenn Flear
2-30 G. Flear - M. Pein
Metz 1 984
27 .. JWa6!
In the game, my opponent blundered with
27 . . . fxg3 ? 28.li:Jxb6 gxh2t 29.�xh2 axb6
30 .Wfc l b5 3 l .a4 which enabled me to win a
few moves later.
28.c!Llxc5 Wfb6
White's attack is stopped in its tracks by the
pin, and so Black has a winning position.
Tactimania
pin 32.f4 E!:d5 33.c4!) 32.c3 fxe4 33.cxd4 exf3 !
34.E!:xe5 dxe5 3 5 .dxe5 E!:xe5 and Black has an
extra pawn, but this may not be enough to
win.
3 1 ... dxc3 32.�c2 fxe4 33.�xe4 �xe4 34.fxe4
�xe4 35.�xc3 c5 36.�d3 �e6
Or 36 . . . E!:b4.
37.�g2 �f7 38.b4 �e7 39.a5 bxa5 40.bxa5
�e2t 4I .�f3 �a2 42.�e3t �d7 43.�e4
�xa5 44.�f5 c4t 45.�g6 �g5t 46.�f7 d5
47.�e7t �d6 48.�e8 d4 49.�d8t �c5 0-1
29.�h1
Just as bad is 29 .Wfxg6t Wxg6 30.E!:xg6t
�xg6.
2-33 M. Hofmann - G. Flear
Balatonbereny 1 983
29 ... fxg3-+
14 c!Llxe3!
..•
2-3 1 G. Flear - S. Smetankin
Hastings 200 1 /2
A mini-combination which wins a pawn.
1 5.Wfxe3 exd4
Forking!
22.Wfe1 !
16.Wfd2 dxc3 17.ixc3
Th e p i n has a paralysing effect. After 22.We2
Black can free himself with 22 . . . ic4.
Black now has to be careful about possible
counterplay.
22 .. J:�a7
17 ...Wfe7 18.c!Lld4 c!Llxd4 19.i.xd4 b6 20.�fel
ixd4t 2 1 .Wfxd4t Wfg7 22.Wfd2!
Alternatives are no better: 22 . . . b4 23.tt::l a4
and tt::l c5, 22 . . . if7? 23.E!:xe8 or finally 22 . . . Wd7
23.tt::l e5 Wd6 24.tt::l d3 and White steps up the
pressure.
23J:�e5 �ae7 24.c!Lle4 Wfc7 25.ltlc5 Wfc8
26.c!Ll h4!
If 22 .Wfxg7t Wxg7 23 .Ei:e7t, Black has
23 ... E!:f7.
22 �fe8 23.b4 axb4 24.axb4 �xe1 t 25.�xe1
�e8 26.�d1 ie6 27.�cl Wff6
..•
Eventually I won due to the extra pawn.
Black soon loses material.
2-34 Y. Collin - G. Flear
1-0
Metz 1 984
2-32 M. Devereaux - G. Flear
British League 2003
29 ... f5! 30.f3 �e5!
The impatient 30 . . . d5? is premature because
of 3 l .e5.
3 l .c3!?
Instead, 3 l .�g2? loses a pawn without a
fight after 3 1 . . . d 5 .
On the other hand, 3 l .Ei:d 1 ! is more robust:
3 l . . .c5 (after 3 l . . .fxe4 White is saved by the
•
38 ... c5!
Enabling Black to take possession of the d4square.
39.�b3?
The best chance was 39 .�g3! although after
39 . . . cxd4 40.Wfc8 tt::l d8! White would still have
great difficulties.
Otherwise, 39.dxc5 d4 and 39.tt::l xc5 ixc5
40.dxc5 d4 clearly favour Black.
39 ... cxd4 0-1
Tactics for Tyros
2-35
2-38
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Glenn Flear
2-35 G. Flear - G. Hjorth
Heraklion 1 984
Tactimania
32 .B:xa3 33.'1Wd4 Wl'xd4t 34.'it>xd4 'it>g7
•.•
Whereupon the endgame with a couple of
passed pawns should be winning for Black.
28.tLlcxd6!
Destroying Black's defences.
2-38 G. Flear - E. Shvidler
Tel Aviv 1 989
28 ... tlJxd6 29.i.xc5
Both a pin and a fork!
29 ...hg4 30J�h2
32 .. J3a7!
A discovered attack which wins on the spot.
Here 30.fxg4 tt:l xe4 3 1 .'1Wxb4 ctJxcS is
less clear, although after 32.d6! (32.'\WxcS ?
.B:c8) 32 . . . .B:c8 33. @ b 1 White i s still much
33.Wfxc6
better.
33 .. J'hal t
30 ... tLlxb5 3 l .axb5 !:U'7 32.Wfxb4 .B:c7
33 . .B:xa8 Wl'xa8 34.'it>b 1 i.cS 35.d6 .B:d7
36.i.c4t 'it>h7 37 . .B:d2 i.f6 38J3g2 i.g5
39.Wfc3 .B:g7 40 ..id5 Wl'a4 41 .'1Wb3 1-0
Intermediate moves, such as this one, are
sometimes referred to by the German word
Zwischenzug.
2-36 G. Flear - J. Norgaard
2-39 G. Flear - G. Rechlis
Copenhagen 1 983
Tel Aviv 1 989
2 1 .tLlxf7! 'it>xf7 22.1:!d6 tiJ dS 23Jlel 'it>g8
24 . .B:exe6 tLlxe6 25.Wfxe6t
With an extra pawn and a superior position.
1-0
2-37 G. Flear - R. Polaczek
Brussels 1 987
Or 33 . .B:xa7 '1Wxe8.
34.'it>h2 .B:xc6 0-1
23 . .!lJxg6t!
A strong pin.
The game continuation, 23.ltJxc8 '1Wxc8
24.i.e3 e4 2 5 .i.xc5 ltJ xcS 26 . .B:ac l , would
only have been slightly better for White if my
opponent had then continued with 26 . . . exf3!
27.b4 fxg2.
23 ... 'it>g8 24.'1Wc4t .B:f7 25.tLlgxe5
29 ... .B:h4!
A counter-attack against c4.
30. 'it>d2!?
Or 30.fxg6 .B:xc4 3 1 .gxh7t @ xh7, and,
with the queen pinned, White can't do any
damage.
30 ... .B:xh2t 3 I .i>d3 .B:a2!
In the game, Black lost the thread: 3 1 ... '1Wb6?
32..B:g 1 .B:h3 3 3 . @ e4 '1Wb8? (33 . . . .B:h4t 34. <tt> f3
.B:h3t=) 34.'1Wf6! '1Wb3 3 5 .'1We6t @ f8 36.'1Wc8t
<tt> e7 37.f6t! @ xf6 3 8 .'1Wf8#.
32.'it>e4
Hopeless is 32.fxg6 .B:xa3 33.gxh7t <tt> x h7
due to the fatal pin on White's queen .
•
More pins!
25 ...Wfe8 26.tLlxf7 '1Wxf7 27.WI'xf7t 'it>xf7
28.i.e3
White has a winning advantage.
•
Glenn Flear
2-40 J. Emms - G. Flear
Southend 2009
1 2.<�hg5!
A sacrifice that enables White to maintain
strong pressure along the h4-d8 diagonal.
12 ... hxg5
1 5.ttlf5t
l3.i.xg5
�g7
14.�6 ttl b8
Instead 1 5 .�xe6?! is less convincing, for
example 1 5 . . . �xe3 I 6.%Vxe3 fxe6 1 7.�h6t
@ f7 and Black escapes.
1 5 ...i.xf5 16.�xf5 ttl bd7 17.h4!
Black's pieces are paralysed by the pin.
Tactimania
Material is only equal, but White's pawn
structure is so superior it's almost as if he is
a pawn up. Note in particular the sorry pawn
on h5.
17 ... E!e8 18.0-0-0 ig7 19.E!hfl !f6 20.ig3
ig5t 2 l .�b1 f6 22.lbf5 ttlx£5 23.ixf5t
�d8 24.h4 i.e3 25.i.e6 E!h£8 26.b4 ic8
27.E!d3 ih6 28.E!f5 ig7 29.E!xh5 h6 30.E!f5
�e7 3 l .hc8 E!xc8 32.Lc7!
A nifty fork!
32 ... �d7
32 . . . :gxc7 33 .d6t .
17 .. J�g8 18J�h3 �e7 19J�f3 �h8 20.�e2
33.d6 E!ce8 34.�c2 E!e4 35.�b3 gf7 36.g3
E!£8 37.a4 E!e2 38.a5 1-0
Alternatively 20.%Vxf6t tt:Jxf6 2 l .�xf6t %Vxf6
22.:gxf6 :gxg2 23.'it>e2 with a clear advantage.
2-42 G. Flear - D. Wheeler
20 .. J:!g6 2 l .h5 gxg5 22.�xg5 �h7 23.E!g3
ggs 24.�f5t �h8 25.E!xg8t �xg8 26.h6
�h8 27.E!h1 c6
If 27 . . . tLl c 5 , White has 28 .:gh3 lLlxb3
29 .%Vg5 .
28.E!h3 !b6
British League 2008
29.ie3!
The most precise.
29 ... ttl dc8 30.ttlxd7 ttlxd7 3 l .!f5
White nets at least a piece.
No better is 28 . . . d5 29.:gg3 .
29.E!g3 ids 30.E!g7
The continuing pressure is j ust too strong.
3 l ...E!d8
If 3 l . . . tt:J cb6, simply 32 .�xb6.
32.i.g5t �d6 33.Lds 1-0
30 ... d5 3 l .exd5 lb c5 32.dxc6 ttlxb3 33.axb3
bxc6 34.g4 e4 35.d4 e3 36.fxe3 �d6 37.g5
�h2t 38.�d3
2-43 G. Flear - R. Calvin
Lanes 2009
Even better is 38 .%Vf2 ! .
38 ...�h1
2 l .ixf6!
If 3 8 . . . 'Wxb2 then 39. 'W fl ! should see White
home.
White offers his queen in order to set in
motion an attack against Black's king.
39.�c2 �e4t 40.�xe4 ttlxe4 4l .E!xf7 ixg5
42.c.t>d3 1-0
2 l . .. gxf5
2 l . . . lLl xf6 1oses to 22.%Vxf6.
22.gxf5t
2-41 G. Flear - S. Fruteau
Hastings 2007/8
14.�xh5!
•
A discovered check.
22 ... �h7 23.E!g7t �h8 24.ttlxf7t E!xf7
25.gxf7t
A further discovered check!
A blow that damages Black's structure. White
regains the queen with the following fork.
25 ... �g8 26.E!g7t �£8 27 .E!dg1
14 ... gxh5 1 5.ttlf6t �d8 16.ttlxd7 �xd7
17.ixf4
27... ttlxf6 28.E!xc7 1-0
Also good is 27.�h 5 .
With a winning position .
�
Tactics for Tyros
2-44
2-47
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2-46
•
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Glenn Flear
2-44 G. Flear - J. Teeuwen
Tactimania
ltlxd6 29.gxd6 ltlc3 30.ic2 Wfe7 3 1 .gd3
b4!
Guernsey 1 989
Better than capturing the e-pawn.
17.ltlg6!
White has a prosaic alternative which also
wins: 1 7.'1Wc2 tt:lxe5 1 8 .dxe5 a5 ( 1 8 . . . \Wxe5
l 9 .�b4) l 9 .'1Wxe4 tt:l f6 20.\Wd4.
32.Wff4 .ieS 33.Wfd2 Wfxh4 34.ltl cS if4
3S.Wfe1 WigS 36.ib3 WfxcS 0-1
2-47 N. Dobrev - G. Flear
Marseille 2004
17 ... ltlxc7
Otherwise 1 7 . . . \WfG l 8 .'1Wg3 would allow
White to win the exchange, as the f-pawn is
pinned.
29 .. J�2f6!
After l 9 . . . tt:l a6 20.tt:lxc8 :!"i:axc8 2 l .�d5
Black loses a pawn.
Correctly avoiding any simplification that
would j ust help White to unpin. After this
quiet retreat the pressure along the c l -h6
diagonal is j ust too strong.
20.ltlxc8 gaxc8 2 1 ..idS
30.tlJc4
1 8.ltlxe7t 'it>h7 19.gacl ltle6
A pawn is lost and this is only the beginning,
Black is already on the slippery slope to defeat.
as
2 1 ...ltlf6 22.ixb7 gb8 23.ic6 gfd8 24.ib4
ltl dS 2S.ixdS gxdS 26.gc6 gbd8 27.gecl
g8d7 28. <i>fl tlJd8 29.g6cS ltle6 30.gxdS
gxdS 3 1 .gc6 hS 32 ..icS a6 33.b4 1-0
2-4S G. Flear - C. Vernay
Guingamp 2008
If instead 30 J!:de2 :!"i:e8 3 l .ig2 �g4, White
loses too much material.
Otherwise if 30.g4 :!"i:e6 3 l .g5 :!"i:xe4 32.gxh6
:!"i:fe8 (another pin!) 33 .:!"i:d3 :!"i:xh4 34.:!"i:fl �e6
White will lose a second pawn.
30 ....ie6 3 1 .ltle3 .id7 32.ltlc4 gn 33.gxfl
gxn t 34.'it>c2 ixd2 35.'it>xd2 gg1 36.tlJd6
gxg3 37.ltlxb7 gg4 38.'it>e3 gxh4 39.a4
'it>g7 40.b4 'it>f6 41.ltlaS gh3t 0-1
2-48 G. Flear - M. Bissieres
2 1 ...ltledS!
In the game, my opponent played the
inferior 2 l .. Jk8 ? ? , and then after 22.:!"i:ac l �b8
23 .'1We2 '1Wc7 24.g3 I obtained some advantage
due to the bishop pair.
22.gacl ltlxc3 23.gxd8 gxd8 24.ixc3 gc8
The pin should then be decisive.
2-46 D. Tan - G. Flear
British League 2004
Avignon 2005
14.ltlc6!
The possibility of a check on d5 enables
White to net an important central pawn.
14 ...Lc6 1 S.gxc6 'it>h7
If 1 5 . . . :!"i:xc6, then 1 6.ixd5t; whilst following
l 5 . . . tt:l f8 1 6.:!"i:xf6 gxf6 1 7.\Wc l �g7 1 8 .\WcG,
White also picks off a pawn.
16.ixdS ltlf8 17.Wfb3
23 ... lLl dS!
Using a pin along the e-file in order to hunt
down the b-pawn.
24.gdl?! ltlxb4?!
Even stronger here is 24 . . . tt:l e 5 ! 2 5 .\We2
tt:l c3 .
2S.ib 1 Wfa7 26.h4 hS 27.if4 ltla2 28.ixd6
•
Rather than l 7.:!"i:xf6 '1Wxd 5 , which would
give Black some hope.
17 ... gxc6 1 8.Lc6 gc8 19.Wffi WigS 20.f4
Wfg6 2 1 .Wfxg6t 'it>xg6 22.gc1 gd8 23.e3
ltle6 24.b4 aS 2S.bxa5 bxaS 26.ia4 gd6
27.ib3 1-0
�
Tactics for Tyros
2-5 1
2-49
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Glenn Flear
2-49 G. Flear - P. Rooney
Leicester 1 98 8
Tactimania
36 ...Wfg5 37.i.d2 Wff6 38.E!:xa6 E!:d8 39.1g5!
1-0
2-5 1 L. Ravi - G. Flear
24.e4!
Although the alternative l i n e 24.CLJxe6 l!ffxe6
2 5 J'hf5 E!:xf5 26.E!:xf5 l!ff g6 wins a pawn, the
presence of opposite-coloured bishops would
give Black drawing chances.
Marseille 2006
27... c!Llxfl!!
A surprise!
24 ... dxe4 25.d5! e3
28.i>xfl Lc5 29.E!:e4
Mter 25 . . . �xd5 26.E!:d 1 the pin along the
d-file would give Black a hard time.
Mter 29.dxc5 , the point behind Black's 27th
move becomes clear: 29 . . . 1!ffx f3t! 30.�xf3
CLJ d4 t with a fork, but this isn't the end of the
story, by any means. Going further, the best
continuation 3 1 . �f4! CLJ xb3 32.E!:ad 1 CLJ xd2
33.E!:xd2 �e6 34.�f5 E!:ae8 would then leave
Black with an extra pawn and decent winning
chances in the double-rook endgame.
26.dxe6!
A strong fork.
26 ... exflt 27J�xfl Wfd4 28.exf7 Wfxe5
29.E!:e2 Wfd4t 30.i>h2 Wff6 3 1 .Wfxf5 Wfxf5
32.Lf5 E!:xf7 33.E!:e8t E!:£8 34.E!:xf8t ix£8
35.i.d7 a6 36.i.c8 1-0
29 ... ib6 30.i.e3 ltl c7 3 1 .g4 Wfd5
2-50 G. Flear - J. Gallagher
Hastings 1 989
28.E!:f5!! E!:xf5
Mter 28 . . . CLJ e7 29 .�xg4 lLl xf5 30.�xf5 E!:xf5
3 l .exf5 , White emerges with an extra pawn as
3 l . . .Wixf5 is well met by 32.CLJxd6.
The complications after 3 l . . .�xg4 32.E!:e5
seem less clear.
32.Wfc2 Wfd8 33.h5 ltl d5 34.g5 c!Llxe3
35.i>xe3 hxg5 36.E!:g1 E!:e8 37.E!:xg5 .ixd4t!
38.i>e2 if6 39.E!:g1 .if5 0-1
2-52 G. Flear - T. Rendle
British League 2009
29.Lg4
A pin and a fork all in one!
29 ... ltlhf4t
The resource 29 . . . �xd 5 ! ? is interesting, with
the idea of 30.cxd 5 ? ! l!fixb 5 3 l .�xf5 l!fixd3!
32.1!fixd3 CLJ hf4t 33.gxf4 lt:l xf4t 34.�f3 CLJ xd3.
White should instead reply with 30.exd5 !
lLlhf4t 3 U �rh 1 ! winning material in all lines.
30.lLlxf4 lLlxf4t 3 1 .i>h 1 !
But not 3 1 .gxf4, a s Black would then wriggle
out with 3 l . . .E!:g5 ! .
3 1 . .. c!Llxd5 32.exd5 E!: fl 33.Wfxfl Wfxg4
34.c!Llxd6 E!:£8 35.Wfg2 ia6
White has a strong initiative for the piece.
16 ic8 17.Wfb3 E!:d6 18.E!:fcl Wf£8
.•.
Mter 1 8 . . . We8, I like the pin 1 9 .�b 5 !
(plausible is the alternative 1 9 .�xe4! ?
fxe4 20.E!: l c6; however I'm less keen o n
1 9 .Wc2? because o f 1 9 . . . CLJ xe5 20.E!:xc8 E!:xc8
2 l .Wfxc8 E!:d8) 1 9 . . . Wd8 20 . CLJ c6 (simpler
than 20.l!fic2 CLJ xe5 2 l .dxe5 �d7) 20 . . . 1!fif8
2 l . CLJ xa7 etc.
19.Wfc2 c!Llxe5 20.dxe5 E!:d8 2 1 .Wfc6 ltl c5
A last throw of the dice, but White isn't
obliged to capture the bishop immediately.
If 2 l . . .E!:b8, then 22.e6 with the threat of
e6-e7.
36.h3!
22.Wfxa8 i.a6 23.Wfxa7 hd3 24.Wfxb6 c!Lle4
25.E!:c8 E!:e8 26.Wfc6 1-0
Rather than 36.E!:xa6? l!fid 1 t 37.1!fig 1 l!fif3t
38 .Wig2 l!fid 1 t .
•
1 5.ltlxd5! cxd5 16.E!:c7
In this chapter, I will be asking you to focus on ways to destabilize the opponent's
defences in order to make significant progress. This will generally involve using tactics
to disorganize the opponent, such as by overloading or deflecting a piece, or perhaps
by 'cutting the communication' between defenders .
Here are some explanations for the various terms that appear in this chapter.
•
Deviation or deflection: When a defensive piece is obliged to move
away from an important preventative role.
•
The decoy: A piece or a pawn that is used, often as a distant sacrifice, to
deviate a defensive piece from a key task.
•
Cutting the communication: A move that interposes and,
by consequence, interferes with the coordination of the enemy's pieces.
•
Overloaded: When a piece has too many simultaneous tasks to
accomplish.
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
Here are some examples:
B. Placines - G. Flear
Le Touquet 1 98 8
8
7
Black finished o ff the opponent with .
6
.
5
4
3
. . . loses to . .
.
2
•
.
25 .. J�dlt
... a deviation, as . . .
26Jhdl
26 . 'Wxc3
.
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
.
h
G. Flear - S. Rouchouse
French League 2004
8
In this position White can take the sting
out of Black's counterattack with . . .
7
6
27J��d5!
5
This move (proposed by Alexei Shirov) cuts
the communication between the black rooks
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
after which White should be able to cash in
the material advantage without too much
trouble.
I didn't find this decisive move.
This chapter isn't particularly long, but the exercises can be quite tricky. In several cases the player
concerned did not find the decisive move.
C:an
I.IDU
da
better?
•
Exercises
3-4
3- 1
8
7
6
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
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c
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•
f
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3-5
3-2
8
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a
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3-6
3-3
0
•
8
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2
2
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c
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e
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0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
3- 1 G. Flear - E. Prie
3-4 V. Ayral - G. Flear
St Affrique 2007
St Chely d'Aubrac 200 1
45.c8=Wf!
18 ... �d1 t!
The pawn is used to 'chase away' the black
queen.
19.i.fl
45 ...Wfxc8 46.Wfxe7t
The more precise 46.e6t actually leads to a
forced mate.
46 ... �g8 47.e6 Wff8 48.Wfd7
The e-pawn will soon be able to promote.
1-0
An incisive deviation!
If 1 9 .!hd 1 then 1 9 . . . Wfxc4.
19 .. .'�xc4 20.�xc4 �xa1
Black has won material and the attack
continues unabated.
2 1 .�xb4 ih3 22.�d2 �d8 . . . 0-1
3-5 J. Benito lmaz G. Flear
-
3-2 G. Flear - A. Do mont
Basque League 2002
Geneva 1 986
29 ... �elt!
This should be becoming familiar by now!
22.ia4!
Black's queen is deflected from its defence of
the f6-square.
30J3xe1 Wfxb6 0-1
3-6 G. Flear - G. Wall
22 ...Wfxa4
Torquay 2002
Instead 22 . . . Wfb6 allows 23 .�xd7.
23.if6 1-0
33.� b 1!
Mate follows.
3-3 G. Miralles - G. Flear
Clichy 1 986
37.�e8t!
The rook is deviated from its defence of the
b7-square.
Then, once the rook has moved . . .
37 .. Jhe8 38Jhb7
. . . Black loses his queen. White is then able to
take advantage of Black's loose defences.
38 .. J3e7 39.:!hc7 :!hc7 40.Wfe6
Threatening a fork on e 5 .
40... �h7 41 .dxe5 �e4 42.Wff6 �g7 43.e6
Black has managed to defend the first wave,
but can't do very much while White destroys
his kingside.
43 ... c5 44.h4 �g8 45.�fl �h8 46.h5! gxh5
47.g6 1-0
Mate is inevitable .
•
The queen is attacked and is thus deviated,
either from the defence of g7 or the back
rank.
33 ...Wfxb 1
If 33 . . . \Wf6, then 34J�b8t !i:f8 3 5 .!i:xg7t
and mates.
34.�xg7t �xg7 35.Wfxg7#
Deviate to Dominate
3-9
3-7
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
•
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•
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3- 1 0
3-8
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0
•
•
Glenn Flear
3-7 N. Curto - G. Flear
3-9 I. Radziewicz - C. Flear
Marseille 2005
Le Havre 2000
19 ... llJxb5!
The bishop is lured away from the kingside.
20.Lb5 llJ h4
The threats against g2 and f3 create problems
for the defence.
2 l .ifl
Mter 2 1 .J.g3 !!xd2 22.!!xd2 cxb5 23 .J.xh4
\Wh6 the losses are too heavy.
2 l . .. llJf3t 22.'i? h 1 llJxd2 23.l:hd2
Black has a clear advantage, but has to stay
vigilant. As the vulnerability of his king is a
concern, it's a prudent choice to aim for a more
comfortable life by giving back some material
to eliminate White's main trump, the strong
bishop on d6.
23 .. J�e6 24J�ed1
Or if 24.J.c4, then 24 . . . !!exd6! 2 5 . cxd6
!!xd6 26.J.xf7 \Wf6 27.l'!xd6 '.Wxd6 etc.
24 ... e3 25.fxe3 �he3 26.a4 a5 27.id3 �e6
28J�ifl
Hopeless is 28 .ig3 !!dxd3 29.!!xd3 !!xd3
30.!!xd3 '.We2.
28 .. J�e1 29J�df2 i3xfl t 30 ..ixfl f5 3 l .i3e2
i3xd6! 32.cxd6 �xd6 33.ge8t �c7 0-1
3-8 G. Flear B. Jacobs
-
Hastings 1 984
43.g4!
A small move, but one that causes serious
damage!
43 ...\Wd3
If 43 . . . �xg4, simply 44.\Wg2#; whereas after
43 . . . \Wxg4, White has 44.\Wc3t �g2 45 .\Wc2t
�h3 46.�xg6.
44.'1Wf6t
The knight is lost.
44 ... �xg4 45.�xg6 �h3t 46.ih4t!?
Spectacular, but not really necessary.
46 ... �6
46 . . . �xh4 47.Vfff g 5#.
47.�d3t <;t>g2 48.�xh3t �xh3 49.i.f6 dS
SO.a4 c4 S l .aS eS 52.Le5 d4 53.ixd4 c3
54.Lc3 1-0
•
Tactimania
22 ... llJ e5!
The most efficient.
23.i3xe5
The rook is deflected from the g3-square,
and so . . .
23 .. .ltJg3! 24.ie4?
The best defence was 24.fxg3 '.Wxg3t 2 5 . � fl
!!xe5 26.J.f2, when Black has a significant, if
not winning advantage following 26 ... \Wf4
27.!!d 1 !!ae8 .
24 ... tD e2#
3- 10 G. Flear - M. Yeo
British League 2005
1 5.g8=�!
I like this move, which deviates by promotion,
thus enabling White to gain valuable time to
get organized.
It's rare that one gets to promote a pawn as
early as the fifteenth move!
1 5 ... i3xg8
The intermediate move 1 5 . . . J.xd2t ! ? is
possible: 1 6.�xd2! (rather than 1 6.� fl
!!xg8 1 7 .ixd2 tt:l c2 1 8 .J.xc2 !!xd2 1 9 .if5 t
�b8 20.g4 ig6 2 I .lt::l f3 !!xb2 with enough
compensation) 1 6 . . . !!xg8 1 7.g4 !!ge8 1 8 .id5 !
i f7 ! 1 9 .J.xd4 J.xd5 20.cxd5 l'!xd5 2 I .!!fl !
tt:l xd4 22. �cl when White is limited to a
small advantage.
16.g4 Ld2t 17.bd2! i3ge8 1 8.0-0-0 i3xe4
19.gxh5 llJ f5 20.b3 tD cd4
Black has some activity, but White is
nevertheless able to keep some advantage.
2 l .i3h2 llJg3 22.i3f2 �UB
A plausible improvement is 22 . . . tt:lxh5, but
White is still better after 23.f5 .
23.h6! i3f5 24.i3g2 llJ de2t 2S.llJxe2 llJxe2t
26.�b2 i3fB 27.gg7 i3d8 28J�xh7 llJxf4
29.Lf4! i3xd1 30.gxc7t �d8 3 l .h7 i3e8
32.i3xb7 1-0
Deviate to Dominate
3-1 1
3- 1 3
••
�.i
8
7
7
6
6
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
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g
h
0
a
b
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a
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c
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e
f
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3-1 4
3- 1 2
8
8
7
7
6
•
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
3- 1 1 F. Libiszewski - C. Flear
3- 13 G. Flear - S. Williams
Montpellier 2004
Southend 2009
40 .. J�e5!
14 . .![}xf5!
A modest-looking move, but one that cuts
the communication between the queen and
knight. Black now takes over. . .
The queen is overloaded as it can't effectively
defend both of b7 and f5 at the same time.
4 Uhb6
After 4 1 . lU e4 �xe4 42.fxe4 �xe4, Black
wins a pawn as 43J:hb6 loses to 43 . . . �e3t .
The resource 1 6 . . . �xf2t is surprising, but
even so after 1 7. <i>xf2 �xd 5 t 1 8 . <i> g3 �xa8
1 9.�afl White's advantage is clear.
41 ...\Wx£3! 42Jhb7 '1We3t
17.'1Wxa7
There aren't any good moves left to play, e.g.
43.<i>fl l"i:f5 t or 43 .�f2 �xc l t.
Black doesn't have enough compensation
and White was able to win soon enough.
14 ...\WxfS 1 5.\Wxb7 0-0 16.�xa8 ltla6
43.�h1 �e1 t 44Jhe1 �xe1#
3- 14 G. Flear - J. Payre
Narbonne-plage 2000
3- 1 2 S. Buscara - G. Flear
Cap d'Agde (rapid) 20 1 0
2 1 .�xh5!
26 ...�e2!
The communication is cut between the
queen and the rook on d l .
27.�xe2 ltlf3t! 28.gxf3 �xd1 t 29.�g2 \Wxcl
0-1
From White's point of view, heavy material
losses are unavoidable.
A pretty deflection of the rook.
2 1 Jhh5 22.ltlxc6
.•
The threat to capture on d7 proves to be
rather strong.
22 E!c7
..•
Neither 22 . . . dxc6 23 .�d7t <i>f8 24.�xc8t
nor 22 . . .l"i:xc6 23 .�xd7t <i>f8 24.�xc6 are
playable.
23 . .![}as
The knight on a6 can't move without Black
dropping his rook.
23 ... E!h1 24.E!d1 "Wd8 25.'1Wxa6 '1Wa8 26.\Wd6
"Wd8!
If 26 . . . \Wb8, then strongest is 27. lU c6!
27.e4! fxe4 28.�e2 E!xd1 t 29.hd1 E!c8
30.ia4 '1We7 3 1 .'1We5 �f7 32.<!i]b7 �g8
33.ltld6 1-0
With a winning game for White .
•
Deviate to Dominate
3- 1 6
3- 1 s
0
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
5 I . .. ci>e7
3- 1 5 C. Flear - I. Madl
Oakham 1 988
19 ..ih3!
An astonishing deviation.
White also has an advantage after the
principal alternative 1 9 .axb4! ? , for example
1 9 . . . fxe5 20.!l:fc 1 !l:ad8 2 1 .'1Wb2.
19 ...\Wxe5!
1 9 . . . .id5 is strongly met by 20.e4! and
alternatively 1 9 . . . .ixh3 20. ttJ d6t is catastrophic
for Black.
20.tLlxe5 .ixb3 2 1 .l:!xb3 fxe5 22.axb4 l:!ad8
23.l:!b2
Despite the presence of opposite-coloured
bishops Black has a number of problems to
solve.
23 l:!f6 24.E&a1 E&b6 25.ifl a6 26.bxa6
bxa6 27.l:!xa6 E&xb4 28.l:!xb4 .ixb4 29 ..ic4t
ci>f8 30.l:!a7 i.e? 3 I .ci>g2 l:!d2 32.ci>f3 if6
33.E&a2!? E&xa2 34.ixa2 g6 35. c±>e4 ig7
36.f4 exf4 37.gxf4 ib2 38.ci>f3 .icl 39.e4
.id2 40.h3 ici 4 1 . c±>g4 id2 42.ic4 ie3
43.h4 id2 44.h5 gxh5t?
.•.
Interesting is 5 1 . . . h3!? (which liberates the
h4-square for the bishop) 52 . .ixh3 @e?, but
White can still win: 53 . .ifl ! h6 (or 53 . . . @ f7
54.ic4t @g? 5 5 [email protected] @ f7 [email protected] @g?
57.ci>e6 h6 5 8 . f6t etc) 54.ic4 ih4 5 5 [email protected]
ig5 [email protected], with Zugzwang. Black can no
longer stop the f5-f6 advance, and the further
56 . . . @f8 57.f6 will ultimately win for White
(analysis largely by Michael Massoni) .
52. @d5 h6 53.ih3
It's already Zugzwang but, as mentioned in
the previous note, even having access to the
h4-square would be insufficient for Black. In
fact to draw against this structure, with Black's
king on e7, the bishop should be either on g7
or h8, hitting e5 whilst restraining the f5-f6
advance.
53 ... h5 54.c±>c6 id2
Or 54 . . . @f7 5 5 [email protected] .ie7 56 . .ig2 ig5
57.id5 t @g? 5 8 [email protected] and so on.
A serious error as it was better to avoid giving
White connected passed pawns so readily.
Instead, correct is 44 . . . @g7!, as for example
45 [email protected] could then have been met by
45 . . . h6t [email protected] g5! when Black would be able
to maintain a fortress on the dark squares.
55.f6t ci>f7 56.ci>d7 ib4 57.ifl ia3
58.ic4t ci>g6 59.ie6 h3 60.ixh3 ci>f7
6I .ie6t ci>f8 62.id5 ib2 63.ci>e6 h4
64.ci>f5 h3 65.e6 ia3 66.c±>g4 h2 67.ci>g3
id6t 68. ci>g2 c±>e8 69. ci>h1 ci>f8 70 ..ic6
ia3 ?I .ci>xhz ib4 n.c±>g3 ia3 73.c±>g4
.ib4 74.ci>f5 ia3 75.ia4 ib4 76.c±>e4
ia3 77.ci>d5 ib4 78.ci>c6 ic3 79.e7t ci>f7
80.ci>d5 1-0
45.ci>f5 h4 46.ifl c±>e7 47.e5 .icl 48.c±>e4
id2 49.f5 ig5 50.ih3 ci>f7 5 I .ig4
3- 16 M. Kirszenberg - C. Flear
Tunisia 20 1 0
I n the game, Black missed a win with . . .
33 f5!!
•..
... when the queen can no longer defend both
the rook and the f3-square at the same time.
34.\Wd4
Alternatives are no better, e.g. 34.exf6t lt:Jxf6
3 5 .\Wc4 \Wf3 or 34.\We2 '.Wxb4.
34 .. .'1Wf3 35.e6t c±>gs
•
•
. . . and Black has a mating net.
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Deviate to Dominate
3- 20
3- 1 7
0
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
g h
A piece down, White needs to find an
equalizing idea
a
b
c
d
e
f
•
a
b
c
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e
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h
a
b
c
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3-2 1
3- 1 8
8
8
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3
0
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a
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•
3- 1 9
8
7
6
5
4
3
0
•
Glenn Flear
3-17 G. Flear - J. Shulz
Le Touquet 1 989
Tactimania
1 5.gxc8 '&xeS 16 .ixa5 .ib4 17 ..ixb4 ltJxb4
18 ..ib 1 Y;Vc4 19.Y;Vf3! b5
•
If l 9 . . . ttJ xa2 20.'Wxb7 tt:l b4, there is 2 l . f5 ! ? .
29 ..ixe7t!
20.a3 lLl d5
White saves himself with this resource.
Now, White should have continued with . . .
29 .. .'j;lcs
2 l .f5!
Otherwise, if 29 . . . .ixe7?, Black loses control
of the d4-square, and so White continues with
30.Ei:d4.
. . .when Black would have
compensation for the pawn.
30 ..ixf6 �dl t 3 l .<i>g2 .ixe4t 32 ..ixe4
�xg4t 33.<i>fl �d1 t 34.<i>g2 �g4t 35.<i>fl
�d1 t 36.<i>g2 '!Wg4t 37.<i>fl V2-1/z
3- 18 J.P. Boudre - G. Flear
Marseille 2006
25.e6!
A pretry move that is based on deviation,
whilst also invoking the theme of cutting the
communication.
25 ... fxe6
Here, 25 . . . f6 allows 26.'Wxh4.
Otherwise, even if 25 . . . f5 avoids losing a
piece, after 26.Ei:xf5 .if6 27.ixf6 Ei:xf6 28.Ei:xf6
gxf6 29 .Ei:e l White's position would still be a
winning one.
26J�xf8t gxfS 27.gxf8t Y;VxfS
. . . now the queen is deflected . . .
28.'1Wxh4 1-0
3- 19 M. Becker - G. Flear
Marseille 2006
14.ltJxd5!
A shock for me at the time! It turns out that
the black queen is overloaded as she has to
defend a5, c8 and f6 all at once!
14 ... ltJxd5
White also emerges with an extra pawn after
both l 4 . . . Ei:xc l 1 5 .ltJxf6t 'Wxf6 l 6.Ei:xc l and
1 4 . . . exd5 1 5 .Ei:xc8 Vlfxc8 1 6 . .ixa 5 .
•
had
no
3-20 G. Flear - A. Pfeifer
St Affrique 2005
37 ... b4!
Deviating the queen from the f3-square.
The unfortunate (for my opponent!) game
continuation 37 . . . Ei:xh2? 3 8 . Ei:xh2 Y;Vxh2
39 .Y;Ve5 '&h 1 t, only led to a draw.
Finally, the other plausible try, 37 . . . Ei:xd2
3 8 .Vlfxd2 'Wf3t 39.<i>gl 'Wd3 40.'Wa5, would
probably enable White to escape with a
perpetual check.
38.axb4 cxb4 39.Y;Vd4 '1Wf3t
It's mate next move.
3-2 1 A. Vaisser - G. Flear
French League 2004
3 1 gxg2t!
..•
Deflecting the knight.
I missed this idea at the time, and following
3 l . . . .ixf4? 32 . .ixf4 t <i>b7 33 .Ei:xf6 El:xg2t
34. @a3 (here this square is available!) 34 . . . '&d7
3 5 .'&c5 Ei:e2 36 . .ie5 White had a dominating
game.
[email protected] 1
After 3 2 . tt:l xg2 'Wxe6 33 .'&xa6 'Wd7 the
h-pawn would be decisive; whereas after
[email protected] then 32 . . . h3! and Black wins.
32 lLlxd4! 33Jhd6 '!Wf5t 34.<i>a1 lLl c2t
[email protected] Y;Vest 36.Y;Vc3 � e3t
.••
Black is winning .
Deviate to Dominate
3-23
3-22
0
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
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0
a
b
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a
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3-24
).
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
3-24 G. Flear - J. Aagaard
3-22 G. Flear - A. Ruiz Gomez
Basque League 2008
Great Yarmouth 2007
41 .ie7!
27.�d6!
This nice move (suggested by Sebastien
Maze) cuts the communication berween the
black queen and rook.
Following 4 1.\We6? d3 42.1::\ d 8 c4 43.\t>b l
c3 44.bxc3 Wxc3 4 5 .Vffx f7 'Wc2t, the game
instead ended with perpetual check.
With the appearance on the board of a fork
(c6 and h6) , the knight on e8 is invited to
move away from the defence of the g7 -square.
In the actual game, after the continuation
27.if4 f6 28 .ih5 tt:l f8 29.ixe8 ixe8 30.El.d6
tt:l e6 White no longer had any advantage.
41 ...Wd7!
27 ... l£lxd6 28 ..ixd6
Best. Mate is close after 4 l . . .ixe7 42.'Wxf7.
Nor is 4 1 . . . 1::\ xe? 42.1::\ xf8 any better, due to the
threat ofWg8t .
28 ...\W£6 29.ie5 \Wfl
3 1 .�g3
With a winning attack.
42Jhf8!
If 42.Vffx f7?, Black escapes with 42 . . . Vffxa4t
drawing.
42 ... �xf8 43.ixf8 d3!
Black succeeds in continuing the struggle.
44.'?Nb3! d2 45.\Wdl '?Ne8! 46.'?Nxd2 \Wx£8
47.'?Nd3 '?Nf6 48.'?Ne4
White will have reasonable winning chances
in the endgame.
3-23 G. Flear - R. Franca
Narbonne-plage 2008
36.if5!
The communication berween the rook and
queen is cut.
Otherwise, White could instead continue
with 36.'Wd4 'it>g7 (36 . . . tt:l h 5 3 7 . lLl f5!) 37.1::\ c 6
which is also promising.
36 ...�xf5 37.�xf5 ixf5 38.We5
A pin that enables White to regain the piece
in all variations.
38 ... '?Nh4
Here 38 . . . 'it>h7! is the most robust, but
the pseudo-endgame after 39.Vffx f5 t 'Wxf5
40. tt:lxf5 1::\ e 8 4 1 .1::\ c? 'it>g6 42. tt:l e7t 'it>g7
43.1::\ a? will be difficult to defend.
39.\WxfS �g7 40.�fl '1Wh6 41 .�c6 �e8
42.�xf6! 1-0
Everything
4 3 . tt:l h 5 t .
•
Hitting both the queen and mate on g7.
collapses
after
42 . . . 'Wxf6
30.ixg7t
�g8
Getting a strong attack going is one of the most common ways to overpower an opponent. So in
this chapter I will be asking you to solve exercises in diverse positions where an attacking attitude
will be required!
An attack can be a 'one-mover' , but can also be considered as 'a combination of serious threats
in a limited area' . The latter usually results from a concentration of forces and, more often than
not, concerns the neighbourhood of a potentially vulnerable king.
Sometimes an attack leads directly to mate, but often (if the defender puts up resistance) the
attacking side will have to settle for lesser gains such as a material plus, a favourable endgame, or
perhaps j ust a strategic advantage.
One shouldn't get too frustrated if the payment for one's attacking imagination is not always as
high as one would like. In one's real games this is often the case!
The term initiative means having pieces that are more active and dynamic than the opponent's.
It's almost like having an embryonic attack. It's widely used in chess literature in those cases where
there is nothing concrete as yet, but nevertheless one side seems to be running the show!
The typical consequence of the initiative is that one player will be creating threats, and his
opponent will be principally preoccupied with meeting them.
Naturally it will be necessary to use various tactical themes already met in the preceding chapters.
However, in order to apply these to generate attacking chances, it might be wise to ask yourself
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
certain poignant questions:
Does my opponent have any weaknesses that could perhaps be exploited tactically?
Although my pieces are well enough placed, how can I use them to cause direct problems for
my opponent?
Is there a way to unleash the pent-up potential in my position?
Here are some examples to give an idea of the type of exercises you will come across in this chapter.
Note that the first move isn't always spectacular, but sometimes just a handy preparatory move.
J.P. Boudre - G. Flear
8
French League 2005
7
At this point in the game, my opponent
was able to start an attack against my poorly
defended king.
6
5
4
38.g l c6! '?:Y£8 39.gxh6! �xf2t
If 39 . . . gxh 6 simply 40.'i'h7#.
40.hf2 galt 4 I . c;f] h2 1-0
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
A. Greet - G. Flear
Southend 2007
8
Mter the following move Black is well-placed
in the fight for the initiative.
7
1 8 d3!
•••
The point is to liberate the d4-square for
the knight.
6
5
1 9.gxd3!?
4
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Mter 1 9. cxd3 ClJ d4 20.\We3 �xg4, Black
has an extra pawn and well-installed minor
pieces.
Alternatively, the complications arising
from 1 9.\Wf3 dxc2 20 . .txd6 c l =Wf 2 l .!xf8
Wfxd l 22.l'hd l l'l:xf8 23.gxf5 ClJ d4 24.Wfh3
h5 yield an edge for Black, due mainly to the
fine centralized knight.
1 9 .bd3 20.'i'xd3 c!lJ d4 2 1 .'i'h3 h6
22.c!lJe4 �c6 23.�xh6 gae8 24 ..ixg7 c;f]xg7
25.g5 ghs 26.�d3 �xb3 27.axb3 gh4
•••
Black then has a material advantage, plus
the initiative .
•
On the Attack!
G. Flear A Stefanova
-
.
Tunis 1 999
33.g5t!
Perhaps not the only move that offers
White an advantage, but certainly the most
efficient.
As for the alternatives, 33 .Wfxa6 for example,
isn't bad either, but the game continuation,
33 .Wfe4?! e5 34.g5t cj;>h7, was less precise
and Black was able to hold out.
8
7
6
5
4
3J .. ,cj{xg5
3
2
0
1
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
If33 . . . cj;>h5, White has mate in three starting
with 34.Wff3t; whereas after 33 . . . cj;>h7 then
34.Ehg7t! cj{xg7 3 5 .'Mfd7t cj{g8 36.1Mfxc8t
cj{g7 37.'Mfb7t cj{fg 3 8 .'Mfxa6 is convincing.
34.W/e4!
Suddenly, Black's king is denied any shelter
and mate is close.
34 ...�c4 35.�e5t i>h6 36.�xg7t i>h5
37.f4
With the decisive threat of 3 8 .'1Mfh7t!.
S. Hirsch - Flear, G
Dortmund 1 98 5
19J3e8!
8
An unpleasant surprise for me!
The annoying threat against the f7-square
forces Black to give up a pawn.
7
6
1 9 ... c4
5
If 1 9 . . . ctJ f6 20.�xf8t .ixf8 2 I .ixc5 �xeS
22.dxc5 , Black cannot retake on cS and
1 9 . . . �xe8 ? is even worse, e.g. 20.Wfxf7t cj;>h8
2 1 .'1Mfxe8t tt:'l f8 2 2 . tt:'l f7t cj;>h7 23.tt:'lxd6.
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
20.�£3 �f6 2 l .bd6 Wfxd6 22Jhffi t cj{xffi
23.'!Wxb7 �e7 24.'!Wa8t � e8 25.W/d5
White's
decisive.
advantage
is verging on
the
•
Exercises
4- 1
4-4
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
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•
4- 6
4-3
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•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
4- 1 D. Velimirovic - G. Flear
4-4 C. Flear - B. Pilotelle
Szirak 1 987
Montpellier 1 99 1
1 8.'?9g4!
8.�g5! '?Ne8
The queen is activated in order to bolster the
arrack.
The lesser evil would be 8 . . . e6 9.ixe6 '1We7
when Black only loses a pawn.
18 ... .if6 19.'?9xe6 .ixh4 20Jhe4 ci>ds
2 1 .�xf4 .ic8 22.'?9f7 .ig5
9.lDb5
Black survives the first wave, but his king's
position remains a concern.
9 ... �b8 1 0.�xc7 fMds
1 2.<�� ge6
23.�fl bel 24.�xcl �e4 25.�f2 !d7
26.!c2 '?Ng4 27.!d3 '?Ng5 28.�a1 �e8 29.h4
'?Nd5 30.�c2
1-0
Brutal!
Very brutal!
4-5 P. Goerens - G. Flear
With a persistent advantage to White.
4-2 G. Flear - P. Large
Surrey 1 984
1 1 ..ixf7t ci>hs
Luxembourg 1 988
25 ...ixc5! 26.gxh4
26.fMxc5 loses to 26 . . . �xe5! 27.fxe5 �f2t.
22.�xe4!
26 ...�h6 27.�xg7t
The attack is too strong.
22 ... '?9xe4 23.�h8t ci>e7 24.'?9xe4t
If 27.fMxc5 , again 27 . . . �xe5.
27 �xg7 28.J.xg7 '?Nxf4t 0-1
..•
Mare follows shortly.
1-0
4-6 G. Flear - 0. Hadamard
St Affrique 2009
4-3 G. Flear - D. Norwood
Chichester 1 984
16.�xg5!
Black's defences on the kingside are badly
damaged.
16 ... b5
If 1 6 . . . hxg5 1 7.'1Wxg5 tLle8, White has 1 8 .f6,
or even 1 8 .ixg7 tLlxg7 1 9 .1ltfxe7 f6 20.e5!
when the queen escapes unscathed.
17.�f3 b4 1 8.ixf6 !xf6 19.'?9xh6! ig7
20.fMh5 f6
Black is mated after 20 . . . bxc3 2 1 . tLl g5 B:fe8
22.f6 ! .
2 1 .�e2 d5 22.e5 fxe5 23.�g5 �f6 24.'?9h7t
ci>£8 25.�e6t he6 26.fxe6 �g8 27.g5 �f4
28.�xf4 exf4 29.fMf5t 1-0
•
26.fthg5! fxe3
If 26 . . . ixe2, White mates in two with
27.fMh7t ci>f8 28 .fMf7#.
Otherwise, following 26 . . . hxg5 27.ixh5
�e4 28 .if3 �e6 29 .'1Wf5 Black's kingside
collapses.
27.'?9h7t 1-0
With a rapid mate.
On the Arrack!
4-7
4- 1 0
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
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g
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4-8
0
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e
f
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a
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e
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g
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a
b
c
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4-11
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
0
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b
c
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h
4-9
•
••
0
4- 1 2
8
8
7
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6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
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f
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h
•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
4- 10 J. Nogueiras - G. Flear
4-7 G. Attiel - G. Flear
Narbonne-plage 2005
Szirak 1 986
24 ... ttl h4t!
My opponent found a nice mating net . . .
In the game, 24 . . . �f6?! would have been
less clear after the logical continuation 2 5 . tt:l f3
�e4 26.l:'�h 1 ! .
35.�c8t! �h7 36.�a1 ! g6 37.�aa8 gxf5
38.�h8t c;!;>g? 39.�ag8t c;!{f6 40.�xh6t �e7
41 .�f2 1-0
25.�h 1
The threat of i.h4t leaves Black with no
reason to play on.
If 2 5 . gxh4, Black has a straight mate by
25 . . . �h2t 26.�f3 �h 1 #.
2S ...�h6!
4- 1 1 G. Flear - M. Condie
The attack is winning.
Bath 1 987
0-1
1 5.ttlf6t! �h8
4-8 G. Flear - K. Arkell
Hastings 1 988/9
24.i.xe5!
White sacrifices a piece to demolish Black's
defensive wall.
24... dxe5 2S.Wfxe5 i.g4 26JU6 Yfh5 27.Yfxc7
�g7 28.�e5
White's major pieces dominate.
28 ... �g5 29J:!:e7 �g7 30.h3 �c8
30 . . . �e2 is refuted by 3 l .g4 etc.
3 1 .Wfb7 �xc4 32.hxg4 1-0
If 1 S . . . gxf6, White has a very strong attack
following 1 6.'l¥fxh6 tt:l d7 (or 1 6 . . .'\¥ff8 1 7.�xd8
�xd8 1 8 .exf6 �f8 1 9.�g5t �h8 20.i.d3)
1 7.�xd7! �xd7 1 8 .exf6 �f8 1 9 .�g5 t �h7
20.�h5t �g8 2 1 .tt:lg5 etc.
16.�xd8t Wfxd8 17.ttlg5!
Both knights are untouchable, e.g.
17 ... hxg5 1 8 .'l¥fh3# or 17 ... gxf6 1 8 . tt:\ xf7t
i>g7 1 9 .tt:lxd8.
17 ...YHe7 18.Wfd3 g6 1 9.he6! ie8
Mate is close after 1 9 . . . fxe6 20 .'l¥fxg6.
20.Wfh3 c;!;>g7 2 1 .ttlxe8t Wfxe8 22.ttlxf7
White has won two pawns.
4-9 E. Mouret - G. Flear
Toulon 1 986
20 ...Yfg4!
22 ... h5 23.ih3 ttl c6 24.'\¥!e3 �£8 25.�dl
'\¥!e7 26.'\¥fh6t �e8 27.'Wxg6 1-0
4- 12 S. Miischenich - G. Flear
Nottingham 1 987
The exchange of queens removes White's
best defensive piece.
2 1 .Wff5t
30 ... e4!
Mter 2 1 .�xg4t hxg4 22.ig5 g3! the attack
would be too strong.
The invasion (via f2) will ensure the win of
at least the exchange.
2 1 . ..Wfxf5 22.exf5 �g8 23.g3 ttle4
3 1 .lbxg5 �flt 32.�el �flt 33.�d2
With threats against the f2 and g3-squares.
24.�xe4 i.xe4 25.ixf7 �f8 26.i.e6t �xe6
27.fxe6 �xfl 28.e7 �d7 29.�e1 �c2t
30.�fl ig2#
If 33 .i>e2? simply 33 . . . �8f2#.
33 ... �d8t 34.�c2 �dxdl 35Jhe4 �del
36.�h4 �e7 37.tlJe4 gg1 38.g3 �g2t
39.�h3 bS 40.�g4 �f7
With the intention of continuing with
. . . �fl -b l -b2 etc.
41 .c4 gat 42.ttl c3 �gxg3 43Jhg3 �xg3
44.cxb5 axbS 4S.h4 �h3 0-1
•
On rhe Arrack!
4- 1 3
4-1 6
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
4- 1 4
•
4- 1 7
8
7
7
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6
5
5
4
4
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3
2
0
a
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c
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h
4- 1 5
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
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h
a
b
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d
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h
4-1 8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
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4
3
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
•
Glenn Flear
4- 1 3 G. Flear - D. Velimirovic
Zenica 1 987
12 ... ltlxfl!
White's king becomes vulnerable.
Tactimania
25.a3!
The queen can no longer defend the e7square.
25 ... �xe1 t 26.�xe1 gd8 27.i.e5 lLl d7?
28 ..id6 1-0
13.�xfl?
With hindsight, it seems that 1 3 .El:xf2!
would have been better: 1 3 . . . "1Wxg3 1 4.if4
"1Wh4 1 5 . ltl b 5 a6 1 6. ltl xd6 id4 1 7 ."1Wd2 with
complications.
13 ...i.d4t 14.�f3 h5!
Threatening . . . ig4 t .
1 5.ltlf5 gxf5 16.exf5 ltl d7 17.�e1 ltle5t
18.�e2 �xelt 19J�xe1 ltlxd3 20.�xd3
i.xf5t 2 l .�c4 i.e5
4- 16 D. Sellos - G. Flear
Lille 1 98 5
26 ... �ac8!
Black can give up the bishop as his attack will
offer him more than enough compensation.
27.'1Wxb7 �c2
Defending the f2-square costs White his
queen.
22J:!fl .ig6 23 ..if4 ixf4 24J:!xf4 a6 25.ltle4
ixe4 26Jhe4 �fe8 27J::&h4 �e3 28J�a3
�xa3 29.bxa3 ge8 30.gxh5 ge4t 3 l .�b3
�e3t 32.�c4 �g7 33.�g5t �f6 0-1
28.�xg7t �xg7 29.i.xe5t �f7 30.i.g3 Wfh7
3 1 .e4 ge8?! 32.e5?! �e6 33.b5 �ec8 34.a4
�b2 35.�ecl �cc2 36.gxc2 �xc2 37.a5
�c7 38.h3 �c3 39.�b1 �xa5 40.hxg4 �c7
4I .i.h3
4- 14 M. Hebden - G. Flear
The alternative, 4 1 .El:a l El:c l 42.El:a6t �e7
43 .if4 El:d 1 , is not playable either.
London 1 984
4l ...�clt 42.�xcl �xclt 43.�h2 �d2 0-1
White is a clear pawn down.
19.�xc5!
A nice exchange sacrifice in order to take
possession of the dark-squares.
19 ...�xc5 20.gc1 �b6 2 l .�f4
Threatening "1Wf6.
2 l ...f5 22.exf6 0-0 23.�d6 �d4 24.�xe6t
�h8
If 24 . . . El:f7 then 2 5 .'1Wxc6.
25.�e7 �a7 26Jhc6 1-0
4- 17 J.L. Teychene - G. Flear
Bagneux 1 98 5
3 1 ...ltlxg4!
White's pieces are unable to parry the
gathering storm on the h-file.
32.hxg4 hg4 33.f3 �h5!
The only winning move.
34.fxg4 '�Wh i t 35.�fl gh2t 36.�e1 �xc2
0-1
4- 1 5 G. Flear - G. Grimberg
4- 1 8 G. Flear - J. Ady
Meudon 1 984
Telford 1 983
24.ltlxf7!
•
A temporary sacrifice that demolishes Black's
defences.
23 ...hl3!
24....ixf7
24.gxh3 �ffit 25 ..if5
Otherwise, 24 . . . �xf7 is hardly better, e.g.
2 5 ."1Wh5t �g8 26.El:xe6 ltl xe6 27."1Wh7t �f8
28 .'1Wf5 t �g7 29.1e5t �g8 30."1Wxe6t �f8
3 l .a3! 'lWe i t 32.�a2 '1Wxf2 33 .1f5 and the
attack is too strong .
Or 2 5 .El:f3 1g3t 26.�e2 "1Wxg2t 27.�d 1
'1Wxf3 t .
Black's pieces are j ust too hot to handle.
25 ... gxf5t 26.�f3 1g3t 0-1
On the Attack!
4-22
4- 1 9
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
•
a
b
c
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0
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4-23
4-20
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
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4
3
3
0
a
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d
e
f
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•
4-24
4-2 1
8
7
7
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6
5
5
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3
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
•
Glenn Flear
4- 19 G. Flear - R. Douven
Charlton 1 983
24 ...�xg4! 2S.fxg4 �xg4t 26.'if;lh1 llJ g3t!
Did you find this decisive second piece
sacrifice?
Tactimania
19.gxd8t gxd8 20.�xc6 bxc6 2 l .llJxeS �xeS
22.fxeS 'if;lb? 23.�xh6 llJe6 24.gd2 ghs
2S.�e3 'if;lc? 26.h4 a6 27.gf2 gh7 2S.'if;lc2
llJ£8 29.�cS llJ d7 30.�d6t 'if;lb6 3 l .b4 aS
32.bxaSt 'if;lxaS 33.'if;lc3 'if;lb6 34.'if;lc4 'if;las
3S.�c7t 'if;la6 1-0
27 .hxg3 fxg3
The pawns j ust keep advancing!
28.�e2 g2t 29.'if;lg1 h2t! 30.'if;lxh2 gh�t
3 l .�xg1 �f4t 32.'if;lh1 �h3t 33.�h2
�xh2#
4-22 M. Basman - G. Flear
Brighton 1 984
27.�xf7t!
Black's king now becomes badly exposed.
4-20 I. Robertson - G. Flear
Edinburgh 1 983
There are two ways to smash Black's defences:
1) 23.llJcS! llJxcS 24Jhe6! ga7 2S.gd6 �e8
26.dxcS
27 ... 'if;lxf7 28.�d7t �e7 29.�f5t 'if;les
30.�g6t 'if;lds 3 l .gdlt �dS 32.�xe4!
Simple and strong, but not the tempting
32 .�e6? Ei:d7 33 .Wxb6t @e8 as Black would
then stand well!
32 ... gd7 33.�h7
The attack continues unabated . . .
With a winning position.
4-23 V. Ravikumar - G . Flear
Hastings 1 984/5
2) The other path is . . .
23.llJxg6! gg7
Or 23 . . . fxg6 24. lt:J f6t lt:Jxf6 2 5 . 1'he6, and
the pressure against f6 and g6 is j ust too
powerful.
24.�eS gxg6 2S.llJf6t llJxf6 26.gxf6 �dS
27.�f5
Black is defenceless.
4-2 1 G. Flear - P. Motwani
Edinburgh 1 983
1 S.liJdSt!
This move destabilizes Black's set-up.
1 S ...�xdS
Alternatively, 1 5 . . . 'if;lb8 doesn't solve Black's
problems: 1 6. lt:J xe7 gxe7 1 7 .lt:Jxe5 and then
the pin along the d-file enables White to win
a pawn.
If 1 5 . . . cxd 5 , White is the one winning
material after 1 6.cxd5 t 'if;lb8 1 7.dxe6 fxe6
1 8 .�b5 .
16.cxdS 'if;lbs 17.dxc6 llJxc6 18.�bS llJf8
Maybe 1 8 . . . @c7 would have been more
resistant .
•
27 ... llJf4t!
Winning by force.
28.gxf4 �g4t 29.gg3 �d1 30.gh3
In order to avoid mate on h 1 .
30 ...�g1 t 3 l .'if;lf3 �g4t 32.'if;le3 �xh3t
0-1
4-24 G. Andruet - G. Flear
Toulon 1 984
16 ... llJxf2! 17.�xf2 �g4
The attack is so strong that White loses his
queen .
18.�g1 �g3t 19.'if;ld2 gflt 20.�xf2 �xf2
2 l .llJxe4 gf8 22.llJc3 �e7 23.'if;ld3 �xh4
24.e4 �d7 2S.eS �xeS 0-1
On the Attack!
4-28
4-25
•
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€===
"J•
Glenn Flear
4-25 Z. Azmaiparashvili - G. Flear
Tactimania
Instead, 37.�f4 wouldn't be clear after
37 . . . lL'l b6!.
played in the game and White went on to lose)
38 . . . Wfe4t (if 38 . . . E?.e5, then 39.lL'lxd6! 'Wd5 t
40.'1Wf3 t 'Wxf3 t 4 I . i>xf3 and White should
win) 39.i>h2 E?.e5 40.'Wg5t i>e6 4 l .E?.xf7!
i>xf7 (or 4 l . . .i>d5 42.'1Wxg6+-) 42.lL'lxd6t
and wins.
37 ... gxh6 38.Wff5
36 ... �h4t 37.i>h3!
The threat to give a deadly check on e5 or f6
leaves Black with no choice.
Now the only way to avoid getting mated
is . . .
38 ... Wfg7 39Jhg7 i>xg7
37 ...Wfg4t 38.Wfxg4 hxg4t 39.i>xh4
St Vincent 2003
37.J.h6!
White has some technical problems, but my
opponent was able to overcome them.
40.Wfd7t i>ffi 4I .Wff5t i>g7 42.Wfe5t i>ffi
43.Wfhst i>e7 44.Wfxh7t i>ds 45.Wfb7 �a7
46.Wfxd5t i>e7 47.Wfa2 lL'l d6 48.c4 i>ds
If 48 . . . lL'lxc4, White has
50.'1Wc5t i>f6 5 I .'Wxa7 etc.
49 .Wfxc4
a2
49.c5 lL'l b5 50.i>g2 tLl c3 5 I .Wfg8t i>c7
52.Wff7t i>bs 53.Wfest i>b7 54.Wfd7t i>bs
55.Wfd8t i>h7 56.Wfb6t mas 57.c6 1-0
4-26 G. Flear - S. Ansell
British League 2003
. . . which is of course hopeless for Black.
4-28 P. Dittmar - C. Flear
St Vincent 2002
27.�dxg7t!
The game continued 27.E?.gxg7t? i>f8
28.:Bgf7t i>g8 29.E?.g7t i>f8 30.E?.gf7t i>g8
3 1 .:Bg7t with only a draw.
27 ... i>ffi 28J!g8t @f7 29J!6g7t i>e6
30Jie8t i>d6
Or 30 . . . i>f5 3 I .E?.g5t i>f4 32.E?.f8#.
3 I .i.c7t i>d5 32.tLlc3t
The game is clearly winning for White.
24.hd5!
Black's defences are shattered.
4-29 G. Flear - B. Jacobs
24 ... exd5 25.�xf5 Wfh6 26.�xe5! �xe5
27.tLlf5 Wff6 28.Wfxg7t Wfxg7 29.�xg7 �be8
If 29 . . . E?.xf5 , there is 30.E?.g6t and mates.
30.�c7 tLl d3 3 l .�xb7 �ffi 32.tLle7
Black loses at least another pawn.
1-0
4-27 C. Flear - U. Heymann
Battle 200 1
•
Torquay 1 982
25.�cd5t!
A sacrifice that destabilizes Black's fortress.
25 ... cxd5 26.tLlxd5t i>d8
If 26 . . . i>e8, then 27.:Bxf8t when there isn't
a good way to reply, for example 27 . . . lLl exf8
2 8 . lL'l c7t is winning for White.
27.Lg6 hxg6 28J�e5
36.tLlf5!
White's superioriry is clear despite being the
exchange down.
Clearest.
Also possible is 36.'1Wxh 5 t ! ? (not the
most precise, but still good enough to win)
36 . . . i>g7 37. lLl f5 t i>f6 3 8 . h4! (38 . tL'l d4?? was
28 ... i>c8 29.tLl e7t i>c7 30.tLld5t i>cS
3 l .�exe6 �xe6 32Jhe6 �b8 33.�xg6 i>d7
34J�g7t i>ds 35.a4 �e8 36.c!Llf6 :Bhs 37.e5
a5 38.b5 i>cs 39.tLld7 1-0
On the Attack!
4- 33
4-30
••
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Glenn Flear
Tactimania
4-30 M. Kaposztas - G. Flear
4-32 A. Casa - G. Flear
Budapest 1 984
Manchester 1 982
24 ... ltlxe3!
29 ...i.f4!
Offering a piece for three pawns plus the
initiative.
2S.fxe3 V9xe3t 26.ltlf2 :!'!xd1 t 27.V9xd1 V9xd4
28.V9c2 V9xb4 29.V9xc6! V9xd2 30.V9xf6 hS
Black has decent winning chances, especially
as White's knight is dominated.
3 I .g4 b4 32.gxh5 gxhS 33.Wh4 <itf8
34.V9xhS b3 3S.V9hst 'ite7 36.Wh4t f6
37.V9h7t <itd6 38.V9b7?
White could perhaps have drawn with
3 8 .iWd3 .
38 ... b2 39.V9b6t 'ite7 40.V9c7t 'ite6
4I .V9c6t 'itf5 42.V9d7t 'itg6 43.V9e8t 'itgS
44.V9gst 'itf4 4S.V9bst <itf5 46.Wcst 'ites
47.V9c7t 'itd4 48.V9b6t 'itc4 49.V9a6t 'itb3
SO.V9bSt 'itc2 S I .V9a4t <itci 52.V9a3 V9d4
53.'itg2 'itc2 S4.ltlg4 V9d2t ss.<itf3 d4
56.V9a2 V9d3t 57.'itg2 V9b3 0-1
An awkward move to meet.
30.:!'!dd1?
If 30.gxf4? E':xh4 there i s a mating net.
Otherwise 30.E':d3 loses the exchange for
nothing after 30 . . . ie2t .
On the other hand, if30 .id 1 ! ixd2 3 1 .ixf3
E':f5 32.ig4 �d5 or equally with 30.�e 1
�xe 1 t 3 l .�xe 1 ixd2t 32.�xd2 b 5 , White
has some compensation for the exchange and
thus drawing chances, even if Black remains
better.
30 ... c5!
Already decisive.
3 I ..ig6 ixd1 0-1
4-33 G. Flear - N. McSheehy
Charlton 1 983
20.ixa7!
4-3 1 G. Flear - C. Rabineau
St Chely d'Aubrac 200 1
18.d6!
Black's king will lack cover.
20 .. J:!xb5 2 U�acl t <itds 22.:!'!fd1 t ltl ds
23.:!'!xd5t :!'!xdS 24.V9xd5t V9d6 2S.ib6t
'ite7 26Jk7t 1-0
Freeing up the d5-square for the knight.
18 ....ixd6 19.ltld5
4-34 B. Kouady - G. Flear
There are two threats, ltl b6 and ltJxf6t.
19 ... 0-0 20.ltl b6 V9e8 2 I .ltlxa8 V9xa8
22.i.c5
Black doesn't have enough compensation for
the exchange.
22 ... V:!fb8 23.V9dSt ltlf7 24.:!'!fd1 ltle7
2S.V9b7 V9xb7 26.ltlxb7 :!'!c8 27 ..if3 ie6
28.ixd6 ltlxd6 29.ltlxd6 cxd6 30.:!'!xc8t
ltlxc8 3 I .i.g4 i.xg4 32.hxg4 ltl b6 33.:!'!xd6
1-0
Wijk aan Zee 1 988
26.ltl c3!
A patient move that proves to be difficult to
meet.
The game continued with 26.\Wb3t ? ! ib6
27.\Wfl ic7 28 .Wb3t (if 28 .'1Wd7? White is
not actually threatening to capture on c6 due
to the pin along the c-file) 28 . . . i.b6 29 .\Wfl
ic7 30.Wb3t with a draw.
26 ib6 27.V9f7
•..
Now this is strong.
27...ic7 28.V9d7!
White really is threatening 29 .Wxc6 (there is
no longer any pin to worry about) , with mate
to follow on b7, and Black is unable to stop
this .
•
On the Attack!
4-38
4-35
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Glenn Flear
Tactimania
4-38 G. Flear - L. Ftacnik
4-35 R. Tozer - G. Flear
Uppingham 1 988
Belgrade 1 988
29 .. J:�d1 t! 30.i>g2 �d3!
14 c4!
The rook has to leave the sixth rank and then
the king hunt can get under way!
Obtaining access for the knight to the c5square speeds up the attack.
3 1 .E:xa7
1 5.hc4 �d7 16.a4 E:fc8 17.r;i;>b 1 tlJcS
1 8.§'a3 Wlxa4
The knight is lost if 3 1 .1"&c6 ib5 ; j ust as it is
following 3 1 .1"&e6 ic4 32.1"&e 1 !"&xe 1 33.ixe 1
ib3 .
.•.
White is defenceless.
19.b3? ixb5 0-1
3 1 ...�fl t 32.i>g3 .id6t 33.i>h4
Or 3 3 . f4 1"&d3t 34.mh4 1"&h3#.
4-39 M. Pein - G. Flear
33 ...g5t 34.mhs �d3 35J3ast �f8
Barnsdale 1 989
Threatening . . . i.g6 mate!
36.E:xf8t mxf8 37.hd4 i.gGt 3s.i>h6
E:xd4 0-1
4-36 J. Hector - G. Flear
16 ... .!LJ e3t!
This temporary sacrifice exposes
tactical weaknesses in the white camp.
some
Nancy 1 988
17.fxe3 dxe3 18.li)e4 bb2 19J:�xb2 E:xe4!
20.'\¥1£3
A potential defender is removed, thus
speeding up Black's attack.
Following the alternative continuation,
20.ixe4 Wf6t 2 1 .'1Wf3 Wxb2 22.'1Wxe3 ih3t
23.me l !"&e8, material is equal, but not the
security of the respective monarchs!
27.§'xf5 li)c3t! 28.i>a1
2o E:e6 2 1 .mg1 Wlb6 22.E:e2 §'xb3 0-1
26 .. J3xf5!
•..
If 28.bxc3 bxc3 , mate will soon follow.
4-40 J. Pinter - G. Flear
28 ...§'c4 29.bxc3 bxc3 30.E:xd4 §'xd4
3 I .§'e4 §'cs 32.ma2 E:b6 33.§'ast i>h7
34.§'e4t g6 0-1
French League 1 989
22.tiJf6t!
4-37 G. Flear - C. Baker
Leicester 1 98 8
16.ixg6!
The barricades are breached.
16 ... fxg6 17.li)xg6 .ic5
Or 1 7 . . . hxg6 1 8 .§'xg6t mh8 1 9 .E:e3 etc.
1 8.li)xf8 §'xf8 19.E:xe6 ixd4 20Jhd4
White has a material advantage as well as an
attack.
20 ... §'c5 2 1 .E:f4 E:f8 22.§'c3 li) hs 23.E:g4t
r;f;>f7 24.E:e5 §'cS 25.E:xh5 §'xg4 26.E:xh7t
me6 27.E:xb7 §'xg2 28.Wle3t r;f;>£5 29.Wld3t
§'e4 30.§'h3t i>gS 3 1 .E:g7t r;f;>f6 32.§'h6t
1-0
•
Black's king is clearly lacking in support.
22 ... gxf6
Equally hopeless are 22 . . . mh8 23 .'1Wh3 h6
24.ixh6! and 22 . . . m f8 2 3 . lt:l d7t.
23.ih6 1-0
On the Attack!
4-44
4-4 1
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4-42
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Glenn Flear
4-41 J.R. Koch - G. Flear
Paris 1 989
13.fxe5!
Not showing any fear of a discovered, or
even a double, check!
The calm 1 3 [email protected] l is possible, but not
1 3 .cxd4? because then 1 3 . . . ixd4t 1 [email protected] l
bxa4 1 5 .fxe5 ixe5, when Black's pieces would
be well-placed to successfully defend.
Tacrimania
38 ...ixd4t [email protected] '!Wb2t 40.ie2
After 40 .�e2 d 5 , Black has three pawns for
the exchange and the pseudo-endgame will be
highly favourable.
40 ...�f6!
Winning, as White has no counter-threats.
4I .§'xd7 §'xe2t 0-1
4-44 G. Del Rio de Angeles - G. Flear
Spanish League 2008
13 .. .liH3t [email protected] lbxg5 1 5.exf6
Black's king is so fragile, rhe result is no
longer in doubt.
1 5 .. J:�e8
My opponent missed . .
.
27.'1Wxf5!
. . . which wins on the spot:
If 1 5 . . . d5 then l 6.�h 5 .
16J:H5 �xe4 17.�xg5t @ffi 18.lbd2 �xa4
19.§'f3 d6 2o.�hS @gs 2Lb4 1-0
4-42 G. Flear - A. Kosten
Plymouth 1 989
3 1 .e6!
An annoying move, which leaves Black's
pieces awkwardly placed ro restrain the
d-pawn.
27 .. J!xf5 28.�xg7t @ffi 29.�g8t @f7
30.� 1g7#
In the game, I managed ro draw after several
imprecise moves from my opponent: 27.ixf5 ? !
lt:l e7! 28 .ixe6?! (28.if6! E!exf6 29.exf6 �xf6
30J�xg7t! should win) 28 . . . �xe6 29.E!xg7t?
(better was 29 .ixe7 �xa2t 30.�e2 �xe2t
3 l [email protected] Elxe7 32.f5!) 29 . . . E!xg7 30.�e8t
@h7 3 I .Elxg7t @xg7 32.if6t @h7 (there is
no mare!) [email protected] l ic6 34.�xe7t and draws.
3 1 ...fxe6 32.d6 �eb8 33.lbc5 �d8?
A precise defence was required: 33 . . . E!f8 !
34.§'e3! ? (34.d7 E!ad8 3 5 .E!xf8 t lt:lxf8 36.E!fl
§'c4! yields nothing) 34 . . . Elad8 3 5 .Elxf8t
lt:l xf8 36.lt:le4 and Black should hold.
34.d7 lbe5 35.�f4 §'h3 36.�afl
Black suffers with the rook on a8 being our
of play.
36 ... lbg6 37.�4f3 '!Wg4 38.'1Wd6 lb h4
39JHf2 '!Wc4 40.§'xe6t §'xe6 4I .lbxe6 1-0
4-43 U.V. Nielsen - G. Flear
Hastings 1 989/90
37 ... Elxf2t!
A combination that opens up White's king.
[email protected]
3 8 . @ g l �a 1 t [email protected] ixd4t is similar.
•
4-45 J.N. Riff- G. Flear
Chamalieres 2007
25.hl7t!
Devastating!
25 ... @h8
If 25 . . . @xh7, White has 26.�h5t @g8
27.�xf7t @h7 28 .�f5 t @h8 29.E!xc3 E!xf4
30.�xf4 ere.
26J'hd4 ixd4 27.�h5 .ixf2t 28.�h1 hg3
29.ig6t!
An important finesse, as Black could hold
after either 29 .ie4t @g8 30.ixc6 E!c8 or
29.�xc6 "&xc6 30.ie4t �h6.
29 ... �g8 30.�xf7t �ffi 3 1 .�fl if2 32.�f5
.id4 33.id5t .if6 34.�e6! �c7 35J!xf6t!
1-0
On the Attack!
4-48
4-46
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4-47
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Glenn Flear
4-46 S. Navarrete - G. Flear
French League 2009
Tactimania
The best chance was offered
prophylactic 26 . . . �a8 ! .
27.:Sxc4 �g6 28.a4 :Sa8 29.h3 e5 30.�c2
�f5 3 1 .�b3 e4 32.�b4 :SbSt 33.�a3 :Sd8
43 ... a3!
The advanced passed pawn will overload
White's pieces.
44.bxa3 b2 45.tLlc3 W/b3
Simplest here is 45 . . . '1Wd4! 46.'1Wxd4 exd4
47. lt:J ed 1 dxc3 4 8 . lt:J xc3 ixc4 49.a4 ie2! .
46.c!Lled1 ixc4 47.W/b 1 ie2!
Again attacking f3 with this move.
If 33 . . . \t>f4, the move 34.�c3 ! , stopping
. . . �f3, is key. Then after 34 . . . \t>e5 3 5 . b4
the passed pawn couplet will inexorably
advance.
34.a5 :Sd2 35J�c7 f6 36.b4 �f4 37.a6 �f3
38.b5 �xf2 39.a7 :Sd8 40.b6 e3 41 .b7 e2
42.:Se7 1-0
48.Wxb2
4-48 G. Flear - M. Vallet
4 8 . lt:J xe2 '1Wxf3t is also hopeless.
French League 2004
48 ...ixf3t 49.�f2 ixd1
Black wins a piece.
50.Wfxb3 i.xb3 5 1 .a4 �f8 52.�e3 �e7
53.a5 i.c4 54.lt)a2 �d7 55.c!Llb4 ib5
56.c!Llc2 �c7 0-1
4-47 G. Flear - E. Bricard
Canohes (rapid) 2005
16J�d7!
Taking advantage of the temporary pin.
16 ...W/xd7!
If 1 6 . . . '1We8 , White has a decisive attack
with 1 7.ixf6 gxf6 1 8 .'1Wd2! �xh7 ( 1 8 . . . fxe5
1 9 .'1Wxh6) 1 9 . lt:J g4 .
Otherwise, Black doesn't get enough for his
queen following 1 6 . . . lt:J xd7 1 7 .ixe7 lt:Jxe5
1 8 .ixf8 ixf8 l 9 .ie4 etc.
17.c!Llxd7 c!Llxd7 1 8.:Sd1 hxg5 19.:Sxd7 ixg2
20.ie4?!
Better is the tactical move 20.ig6! for
example 20 . . . �g8 2 1 .'1Wd3 �ae8 22.'1Wg3 ic6
(22 . . . ia8 loses to 23 .'1Wc7!) 23 .ixf7t! :!hf7
24.�xf7 �xf7 2 5 .'1Wc7t �f6 26."Wxc6 and,
with Black's structure in tatters, White should
win.
20 ...ixe4 2 1 .Wfxe4 :Sad8 22.:Sxa7
With a clear advantage (queen and greater
activity for rook and bishop) , but Black can
still put up staunch resistance.
22 ... :Sd4 23."1We2 b5!? 24.:Sc7 :Sxc4t 25."Wxc4
bxc4 26.:Sxc5 �h7
•
by the
24.f5!
White aims to create targets in the centre
and on the kingside.
24 ... exf5
Alternatively, after 24 . . . �d7 2 5 . fxe6 fxe6
26.f4 "Wa5 27.�g5 "Wb4 28.b3 White's initiative
starts to become significant.
25.exf5 :Sc5?! 26 ..ixc5 dxc5 27.'1Wh4 W/b7
28 ..ie4 Wfd7 29.hxg6 hxg6 30.fxg6 f5
3 1 .:Scd1 Wfxd1 32.W/xe7 fxe4 33.:Sxd1
:Sxd1 t 34.�h2 1-0
4-49 G. Flear - F. Merle
Perpignan 2004
22.hl5!
Snatching a free pawn as Black daren't
capture the bishop.
22 ... :Sh8
If 22 . . . gxh5 , White mates with 23 ."Wg5t
�h7 24."Wxh5 t lt>g7 2 5 .�e3 .
23.if3 ia8 24.e6 fxe6
Now the simplest is . . .
25.:Sxe6!
. . .for example:
25 ... :Sh6
Or 25 . . . tt:J xd5 26."We4!.
26.:Sde1 c!Llc8 27."Wg5
White is winning.
On the Attack!
4- 50
4- 52
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Glenn Flear
4-50 V. Malakhatko - G. Flear
Marseille 2004
14.lhd6!
Black's king is brought into the range of
White's artillery.
Tactimania
White wins if Black takes the queen
immediately, i.e. 26 . . . exd3 27.l"i:xg7t cj;Jhs
28.l"i:xd7.
27.dxc5 exd3 28.�f6t gxf6 29.gxf6 '1Wd8
30,gxg7t �f8 3 1 .gxg6 '1Wd5t 32.�g1 \Wf)
14 ...ixf3
There is no perpetual check following
32 .. .'\Wxc5t 3 3 .cj;Jh2! '1Wf2t 34.l"i:g2 .
Or 1 4 . . . cj;Jxd6 1 5 .if4t cj;Jd7 1 6.'1Wd3t cj;Jcs
1 7.ixc7 cj;Jxc7 1 8 . lLJ b 5 t etc.
33.ghst �f7 34.gg7t �xf6 35.ic3t �e6
36.ge8t �d5 37.ge5#
1 5.if4!?
4-52 J. De Sousa - G. Flear
Otherwise if 1 5 .ixf3 cj;Jxd6 1 6.if4 t, Black
can repulse the attack with 1 6 . . . e 5 .
French League 2007
1 5 ...ixg2 16.�xg2 g5
Mter 1 6 . . . l"i:d8 1 7 .l"i:ad 1 l"i:xd6 1 8 .ixd6t
cj;lf7 (if 1 8 .. .'�d7 strongest is 1 9 .if8t! cj;Jcs
20.ixg7) 1 9 .ixc7 '1Wc6t 20.e4! '1Wxc7 2 l .exf5 ,
White wins a pawn.
17.hg5 �xd6 1 8.ixf6 i:H8 19.'1Wd3t 'it>c6
20.'1Wf3t �d7 2 1 .�d1 t �c8 22.<�Jb5! 1-0
Black wins, starting with a series of precise
checks . . .
43 .. .l�clt!
But not 43 . . . l"i:g3 t ? 44.<i>h2!.
44.'it>g2 ifl t 45.'it>g3 g 1 c3t 46.�h2 ghst
47.�g1 �g3t 48.�fl
If 48.<i>xfl ? then 48 . . . l"i:f8 .
4-5 1 G. Flear - A. Petrossian
Marseille 2004
48..,gf8 49.'1Wxf8t �xf8 so.cj;lxg3 dxe5
5 1 .d6 ic4 52. �a La2! 0-1
23J1xh7!
4-53 R. Edouard - G. Flear
The rook is taboo: 23 . . . �xh7 24.l"i:h 1 t <i>g8
2 5 .'1Wxg6 fxg5 26.'1Wh7t <i>f7 27. lLJ f5 and the
attack is decisive.
23 ... f5 24.�eh1 ge4!?
42. �xh4 �xg2
25.�cxe4 dxe4 26.�h5
26.lLJ xf5 ! l"i:xf5 27.'1Wxe4 would have been
simpler.
26 ... �xc5
0
.
41 ... �xh4!
White's king comes under the cosh.
Black seeks complications.
•
Geneva (rapid) 2009
There are too many threats, . . . g5t and
.. J'hg 1 being the strongest.
0-1
On the Attack!
4- 54
4- 57
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4- 58
4- 55
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0
I �� :����-- - %�
ri.' %�
" , %9}f%��� ��
�.,,��.��
rg��
m � �!!1
-�- �- - %�-��?m-�" �--�- :
' '
-,
� ���
�. . ..�Y-.'·ij
''%
:
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%
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� �
% '"/
/.
�
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4- 56
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
4-54 G. Flear - S. Lalic
4-57 G. Flear - R. Palliser
Great Yarmouth 2007
British League 2005
33.�xf7!
35Jhf7 t!
This combination works, as White can avoid
the attempted perpetual check.
35 ixf7 36J'{xf7t i>g8 37J�g7t i>f8
38.'?Nh6 '?Nel t 39.i>h2 '?Ng3t 40.i>hl '?Nel t
41 .i.gl l-O
•..
4-55 G. Flear - E. Chaplin
Narbonne-plage 2006
In the game, I played the right idea but
in inferior circumstances: 33 .1xd3? exd3
34.!!xf7 Wfe 1 t 3 5 .i>h2 �xf7 36.W/xh7 (after
36.W/f6t �e8 the black queen stops the check
on e6) 36 . . . :B:g8 37.Wff5 t �e8 38 .Wig6t �d8
39 .1f6t �c8 40 .W/xd3 Wfe6 4 l ."Wd5 lt:'ld8
42.'1Wc5t �d7 43.Wib 5 t �c8 44.'\Wc5t �d7
45 .W/b 5 t �c8 Y2-Y2.
33 i>xf7 34.'?Nf6t �e8 35.Wfe6t tDe7
36.ixd3
..•
19 ... ltlc6!
A powerful move enabling a minor piece to
join in the attack.
Inferior is 1 9 . . . :B:e8t 20. i>d2 g5 2 l .:B:ae 1
and White has control.
The right moment!
36 exd3 37.if6
..•
White wins.
4-58 A. Sydor - G. Flear
20.dxc6 �ae8t 2 1 .ltl e2 ixc6 22.�fl?!
The best defence would have been 22.h3!
'1Wf3 (22 . . . '\Wxe2t ? 23 .'1Wxe2 1xh 1 24.1e3 :B:f3
2 5 .�d2 favours White) 23.:B:fl Wfg2 24.h4
1f3 2 5 . :B: f2 W/g 1 t 26.:B:fl W/g2=.
22 i.f3 23.�f2 �xf4! 24.gxf4 he2 25Jhe2
Wfgl t 26.i>d2 �he2t 27.i>xe2 Wfxal
.••
With a clear advantage to Black.
4-56 G. Flear - L. Van Wely
French League 1 999
25.Wfh5!
The game continued 2 5 .1xc4? :B:xc4 26.'1Wg8
exd5 27.'Wxf7t �c6 28.!!xc4t dxc4 29 ."Wxc4t
�b7 30.'1Wh4 ltl c7 3 l .g3 !!e8 (Black has
consolidated his position) 32.:B:cl Wif5 33 .1d4
Wid3 34."Wf6 '1Wd2 3 5 .!! a 1 :B: e 1 t 36.:B:xe 1
Wfxe l t 37.�g2 '1We4t 3 8 . f3 Wid5 39.h4
"Wxa2t 40.�h3 W/e6t 4 l .g4 lt:'l d 5 ! 42.'1Wg7t
�c6 0- 1 .
The most precise is . . .
25 Wla6
25.Wfd5!
If 2 5 . . . �e7,
27.1xc4.
I continued instead with 2 5 .!!e8 ! ? !!b8
26.1xf8! (26.Wic3 ? wasn't good because of
26 . . .'Wxc3 27.bxc3 f6 28.:B:dd8 �f7! and
Black escapes) 26 . . . ltlxf8 27.:B:dd8 (White's
rooks are dominating) 27 . . . '\WxdS 28 .1'hd8
1g4 29J:hf8t �xf8 30.Wfxg4 :B:d8 3 1 .'1We4 b6
32.Wib7 1 -0.
25 ltlxd8 26.Wfxd8
..•
It's already all over.
•
Metz 1 983
..•
simply
26.W/h4t
�d7
26.i.xc4 �xc4 27.'?Nxf7t i>c8 28.�xc4t
Wfxc4 29.�cl
White should win.
On the Attack!
4-62
4-59
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4-63
4-60
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4-6 1
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•
Glenn Flear
4-59 R. Rey Ardid - G. Fleac
4-62 M. Goodger - G. Flear
Andorra I 98 5
Isle of Man 200 I
23 ... g5!
1 8.'1Wdl !
Th e game finished as a remarkable draw:
I 8 .Ek5t? @xc5 I 9 .�e5t @xc4 20.b3t @d3
2 1 .�e3t @c2 22 .�e2t @ci 23 .�e I t @c2
24.�e2t and V2-V2!
1 8 ... b6 19.'1Wf3! @b7
Or I 9 . . . �b l t ? ? 20.gd l t with check!
20.�d6t @bs 2 1 .�xg6 �e8 22.i.c3 fxg6
23.'1Wf7
With a big advantage to White.
Bringing up the reserves!
24.h3
Or 24.gae i g4 2 5 . tt:l e 5 �h5 and Black wins
a pawn by capturing twice on e5.
24... g4 25.hxg4 �xg4 26.e4
26.fi:fl doesn't hold Black back from playing
26 . . . gxf3!, e.g. 27.gxf3 '1Wh2t 2 8 . @ f2 '1Wxg2t
[email protected] l �xf3 .
26...�xf3 27.'1Wxf3 '1Wh2t [email protected]£1 �f4 0-1
4-60 G. Flear - H. Hamdouchi
4-63 G. Flear - M. Santo-Roman
Montpellier 2000
St Chely d'Aubrac 2002
30.i.xg6!
24 ... �f5!
The game continued with 30.fi:d l @ fs
3 l .e6? (there is still 3 I .ii.xg6! but after
3 1 . . . fxg6, the winning idea would be to
continue with 32.f5 ! ) 3 l . . .ge8 32.f5 ii.g2t
[email protected] �xh2 34. tt:l f3 ixf3t 3 5 [email protected]
�e5 with chances for both sides in the
complications.
The game ended in a draw after 24 . . . fi:xb4?
2 5 .Vfff c6 gb3 26.if4 fi:xb2 27.�e4 gxf4
28.gxf4 �h4t [email protected] �f2t [email protected] �h4t
3 1 . @gl �f2t V2-V2 .
30 fxg6
•..
Or 30 . . . @e7 3 1 .fi:di and White's attack is
the more powerful.
3 l .Wfe6t @f8 32.Wff6t @es 33.'1Wxg6t @e7
34J'� d1 !+4-61 B. Grollemund - G. Flear
St Affrique 200 I
29.id2!
The threat to come to the long diagonal is
particularly strong.
The game continued sadly for my opponent
with 29 .Ji.g5 ? ? tt:l h7 30.ii.xg6 fxg6 3 1 .ii.e7
�g7 32 .�h4 ii.f7 0- 1 .
29 ... tt:lh7
If29 . . . �xb2, White follows up with 30.ii.xg6
fxg6 3 1 .ii.c3 .
30.ii.c3 Wfd1 t 3 1 [email protected] '1Wd6t 32.�g3 Wff8
33.�xg6t! fxg6 34.ia2t
With a mating attack.
•
Tactimania
25.'1Wd1
The lesser evil is 2 5 .g4, but after 25 . . . �h4t
[email protected] ge5 27.Ji.f4 fi:e2 28.fi:fl �xg4
29.Vfff c 6 gfg Black's position is nevertheless
still winning.
25 �xb4 26.�a3 �d4
..•
The queen can no longer cover the h5square.
On the Attack!
4-66
4-64
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4-67
4-65
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(J61'J�!
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
4-64 C. Flear - S. Schlander
4-66 R. Britton - G. Flear
Battle 200 1
Guernsey 1 989
17.g4!
14 ... £5!!
The most incisive.
Otherwise, 1 7 .\W e4 (as played in the game)
wasn't bad: 1 7 . . . f5 (after 1 7 . . . \Wg6 1 8 .\WxgG
fXgG 1 9.i.xg6 White has a clear extra pawn)
1 8 .exf6 lLl xfG l 9 .'.Wxe6t �f7 20.i.c4 (the
most effective would have been the pretty
combination 20. 'Ll e 5 ! '.Wxd I t 2 1 . @h2 with
a strong attack) 20 . . . tLl d 5 2 l .�e 1 i.f6, and
White had an extra pawn, but in a rather
complicated position.
There are two ideas: freeing up Black's pieces
whilst opening up lines on the kingside.
1 5.exf5 .ixf5! 16.gxf5 �d7!
Getting out of the way whereas White's king
will be left in the firing line.
17J�e1 :Sh3 1 8.�fl Wfhs
An extra piece is a minor point when one's
king is chronically unsafe.
19.tDe3 ttld4 20.ttlxd4 exd4 2 I .ttlg2 :Se8
22.£3 :Sg8 0-1
17 ...'.Wxh3 18.Wfe4 f5
If 1 8 . . . g6, White has 1 9 .i.fl winning the
queen.
19.exf6 :Sxf6 20.Wfh7t �f7 2 Li.g6t! :Sxg6
22.tLle5t �e8 23.Wfg8t! i.£8 24.Wff7t �d8
25.�d7#
4-65 G. Flear - P. Morris
Calvi 2007
25 ... cxb3!!
This came as a shock!
26.:Sxc5 bxa2 27.:Sa5
34J'ha5t!
Alternatives are not better as 27. �b2 tLl a4 t
28.�xa2 l2l xc5, 27.Wc2 l2l a4 28.�c4 �b2t
29.�d3 �b l , or even 27.�d2 �d8t 28.�d5
tt:J xd5 29. �e 1 tLl c3! all lose for White.
After 34.i.xf5 ? i.b7 White no longer had
any advantage in the actual game.
27 .. J�c8t 28.�b2 ttlc4t 29.�xa2 tDxa5
30.:Sd5 ttl c6 3 1 .:Sd7 �£8
34 bxa5 35.Wfb8t �a6 36.�xa8t :Sa7
37.Wfcst :Sb7 38.i.xf5!
I don't believe that White could have held
the following endgame.
Oakham 1 988
..•
The initiative will be difficult to resist.
38 ...�a7 39.:Sxb7t �xb7 40.Wfxc5t �b6
Otherwise 40 . . . �b6 is met by 4 l .i.c8 '1Wh7
42.'.Wxa5 t.
41 .'1We7t Wfb7 42.d6! :Sh8 43.d7 a4 44.i.c2!
Stopping any counterplay.
44 ... :Sb8 45.d8=Wf+-
•
4-67 G. Flear - Ni Hua
32.e6 fxe6 33.ttlg5 h6 34.ttlxe6t �f7 35.tlJf4
aS 36.�a3 ttlb4 37.�a4 :Sc4 38.�xa5
:Sxe4 39.g3 g5 40.ttl d3 ttlxd3 4 1 .:Sxd3 :Se2
42.h3 h5 43.�b4 :Sh2 44.g4 hxg4 45.hxg4
:Sg2 46.:Sd4 :Sfl 47.�c5 :Sf4 48.�d5 �f6
49J:!e4 :Sxe4 50.�xe4 �e6 5 1 .�d4 �d6
52.�e4 e6 0-1
On the Attack!
4-7 1
4-68
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4-69
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4-70
•
•
Glenn Flear
4-68 G. Flear - G. Wall
British League 2005
Tactimania
3 1 .�d2 �c4 32.'1Wd3 �d4 33.'1Wxd4 exd4
34.�xc2 '1Wxd5
White's exposed king doesn't give him any
chance of resisting for long.
19.�e1!
19 ltld4
35.�e1 ig5t 36.�d1 '1Wxf5 37.£4 '1Wg4t
38.�cl '1Wxg3 39.�e8t �h7 40.�cc8
If 1 9 . . . a5, White has 20.ctJxe4! fxe4 2 1 .1xe4
and the arrack is decisive.
Going for a final trap before throwing in the
towel.
20.he4! fxe4 2 1 .�xe4 '1Wg7
40 ...ixf4t 41 .�b2 '1Wxg2t 42.�a3 '1Wh3t
43.�a4 '1Wxh5 0-1
White brings the last piece into play.
..•
After 2 1 . . . ctJ f3t, White sidesteps with
[email protected]! when his threats are too strong.
22.ixd4 '1Wg6 23.'1Wxg6t hxg6 24J;h4 1-0
4-71 L. Basora Pascual - G. Flear
Port Barcares 20 1 0
4-69 N. Sulava - G. Flear
Avignon 2005
18.g4!
The most unpleasant for Black, as the threat
to lift a rook to h3 decides the game.
18 1c8 19.�f3 '1Wd7
•..
If 1 9 . . . h6, White crashes through with
20 .1xh6 gxh6 2 l .�f6 @g7 22.1e4.
20.�h3 h6 2 1 .e6!
23 ...ixh3! 24.ltlxh3 �xh3t [email protected] �h8t
26.�g3 '1Wh4t 27.�f3 '1Wh2! 28.�g1
Here 28. �e3 is the most robust defence, but
after 28 . . . l:!h3t 29 .'1Wf3 EI:xf3 t [email protected] '.Wxb2
Black should win.
28 ... �h3t
Black won quickly in the game (see Exercise
1 -36) .
The coup de grace.
4-72 G. Flear - S. Buscara
2 1 ...'1Wd6 22.1xh6! gxh6 23.'1Wxh6 1-0
4-70 E. Prie - G. Flear
Perpignan 2004
25 ... �c3!
A tactical shot that wins a valuable tempo.
For the record, it seems that 25 . . . �c5 is also
unpleasant for White, albeit not as strong as
the move played in the game.
26.'1We4 �ac8! 27.bxc3
The alternative 2?J:!c 1 is well met by
27 . . . ig5 , when White doesn't have any better
than 28.f4 �xc l t 29.l::I: xc 1 �xc l t [email protected] l
exf4 3 I .ixf4 1xf4t 32 .'1Wxf4 '1Wxd5 with a
miserable endgame.
27 ... bxc3t 28.�c2 V;!fb2t 29.�d3 c2 30J�cl
'1Wb5t!
The most precise .
•
Lattes 2005
37 ...ixf4t!
A powerful resource! Black opens up White's
king to the winds.
The game continued with 37 . . . \Wg l t ? ?
3 8 .<±>h3 'IWfl t 39. @h4 and Black had run out
of checks. The final moves were then 39 . . . @ f5
40.l:!xf7t �e4 4 1 .'1Wb4t id4 42.'1Wb7t @d3
43.l:!d7 @c3 44.'1Wb3#.
38.ixf4
I f 3 8 [email protected], Black can even deliver mate with
38 . . . g5t! 39.�f3 g4t [email protected] e5t 4 I .<±>xg4
'.Wg2t 42.�h4 '.Wxh2t 43.<±>g4 '.Wg2t 44.<±>h4
EI:h 1 #.
38 .. J��d3t 39.ie3 '!Wgl t! 40.�h3 �xe3t!
41 .fxe3 '1Wxe3t 42.�g2 '1We4t 43.�g3 '1Wxb7
Black has a winning endgame
On the Attack!
4-75
4-73
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4-74
0
•
Glenn Flear
4-73 G. Flear - K. Spraggett
San Sebastian 2006
Tactimania
27 ...�xe3t 28.i>b 1 Wfg1 t 29.<±>a2 Wfd4
30J�e7 l::U8 3 1 .�e8 Wfxc4t
After 3 1 . . .'tJ!if4, White continues calmly with
32.id5 threatening 33 .Wfe7.
20 ... d4!
A pretty pawn sacrifice that exposes White
on the light squares.
2 1 .ixd4 hg2 22.<±>xg2?
The only hope was 22 .ixf6!, for example,
22 . . . Wfb7 23 . tiJ e i ie4 24.Wfa 1 , when Black
has interesting compensation, but nothing
concrete.
32.Wfxc4 �xeS 33.Wff7 E!d8 34.g4 c4 35.Wfxc4
E!£8 36.Wfd5 id4 37.�xb7 �f6 38.h4 �b6
39.�a8t i>h7 40.b4 �f6 41 .Wfe4t i>hs
42.g5 1-0
White is winning after 42 . . . hxg5 43.hxg5
Elf4 44.Wfc6 i>h7 45 .Wfc2t g6 46.Wfh2t <±>g8
47.'?;Vh6.
22 �b7t 23.i>g1 lL!e4 24.lL!e1 lL!g5!
.••
4-75 L. Polugaevsky - G. Flear
With some serious threats.
25.i>fl '?;Vh1 t 26.lL!g1 ib4 27.i>e2 ixe1
28Jhe1 �xh2 29J�fl lL!e4 30.liJf3 '?;Vg2!
0-1
The threat of. . . liJ g3t is so strong that I
resigned.
2 1 .b3!!
4-74 G. Flear - J.P. Boudre
White opens up lines on the wing where
the opposing monarch is a resident. Funnily
enough, on the other hand, White's centralized
king seems to be safe enough.
Sacrificing a pawn for the initiative, and thus
putting Black on the back foot.
If 2 l . . .c3t! (the best chance) 22.tLlxc3 '.Wb6,
White has 23.'tJ!ib5 �xd4t 24.<±>e3! (daring!)
24 . . . l:!b4 t 2 5 .W/xb6t axb6 26.�ab 1 tLlc5
27.h4 with a favourable endgame.
19 ... llJxd6 20Jhd6 �xd6 2 1 .lLlxd6 '?;Vxd6
22.�d1 '?;Ve7
22.bxc4 �xd4t 23.i>e2! �e4t 24.i>f3 f5
25.E!hb 1
French League 2009
19.d6!
If 22 . . .'tJ!ic7, White obtains persistent
pressure with 23 .'?;Vf5 �d8 24.�xd8t 'tJ!ixd8
2 5 .'tJ!ixf7t i>h8 26.1d 5 .
23.Wfa4 ib6 24.�d7 Wfg5 25.�xf7 i>hs
26.Wfd7 �d8 27.�e6
Black's king is vulnerable whereas the white
counterpart can always hide on a2, thus with
queens on the board White keeps a clear
advantage. It's also worth noting the difference
in effectiveness of the respective bishops .
•
London 1 986
2 1 . �b6?
.•
White's attack is the more convincing.
25 ... �f4t 26.gxf4 Wfc6t 27.<±>e2 Wfe4t
28.i>d1 �d8t 29.lLl d6t <±>c7 30.'1Wa5t i>xd6
3 1 .\WxdSt 1-0
.
:
-
One of the most natural reactions, when shown a chess position , is to start counting pieces
and pawns. It's understood at all levels that the material balance generally weighs heavily on
one's j udgement, but of course we shouldn't forget to take various other factors into account.
In any case, for those who are (in the chess sense!) confirmed materialists this chapter should
please you!
One learns quite early that winning material is often an effective way of increasing the chances
of winning a game. I ndeed when one thinks about it, the majority of threats made during actual
play involve attempting to win a pawn or something bigger.
Sometimes the process of snatching material can begin with a combination involving a pseudo­
sacrifice. The idea then is to set i n motion a sequence of forcing moves during which the attacking
side wins back his i nvestment with interest.
So i n Chapter Five you will be seeking a precise move, sequence, combination , perhaps a threat
or two, or even a simple capture, that ultimately leads to your side ending up with more material
than the opponent.
However, i n the exercises that follow, winning something isn't always the end of the matter.
Indeed, in your own games it's wise to remind yourself not to relax after obtaining an advantage,
as the opponent will be at his most dangerous with his back against the wall. Sometimes, in
tournament play, it's even worth spurning the opportunity to grab material if it allows too much
counterplay. I n the exercises in this chapter, winning material is often linked to prophylactic play,
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
in order to get away with greed, while at the same time limiting opportunities for the adversary.
A term that crops up in the text is a desperado. This refers to a trapped and condemned piece
that manages to eliminate an opposing piece or pawn before its own demise.
Here are three examples to warm you up:
G. Flear - R. Britton
Leicester 1 987
8
7
White is able to force the win of material.
6
40.hg5! tlJxh5
5
Otherwise
40 . . . hxg5
loses
quickly:
4 l .'Wxg5t <j;Jh7 42.lLl xf6t 'Wxf6 43 .'Wg8t
<j;Jh6 44.g5 t etc.
4
3
4Li.xe7 tlJf4 42.hd6 l!J d3
2
0
White has two extra pawns. The game
didn't last much longer:
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
43.g5 tLJf3 44.gxh6t 'i!;>h? 45.hf3 !hgl t
46.'i!;>xgl �xf3 47.c!lJgSt 1-0
J. Plaskett - G. Flear
Brighton 1 984
8
7
My opponent found a powerful temporary
sacrifice.
6
2 1 .tLJxb7! �xb7 22.'!Wc3
White regains his piece and comes out a
pawn to the good.
5
4
22 ... d4
Or 22 . . . f6 23.'Wxc6 with an extra pawn.
3
23.WI'xc6 Wl'xc6 24.�xc6 dxe3 25.�c5
tLJh3t
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Inferior is 25 . . . g6 26 . .!f6 lLl e6 27Jhf5
gxf5 28 . .!xd8 lLl xd8 29J�xe3 , as White then
has all the trumps.
26 ..txh3 i.xh3 27.�xe3
White has consolidated his pawn advantage,
but Black has realistic drawing chances with
the presence of opposite-coloured bishops.
So, Plaskett's combination was correct,
but it's not clear that the resulting advantage is
enough to win .
•
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
G. Flear - C. Garda Palermo
8
Szirak 1 986
7
Here there is no flashy combination, j ust a
precise series of moves:
6
5
19.i.xc6! bxc6 20J!:d6
4
White has two threats, 2Uhh6t and
2 l .Ei:ed 1 , leading, at the very least, to a
significant material gain, so my opponent
resigned.
3
2
0
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1-0
•
Exercises
S-4
S-1
•
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S-S
S-2
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•
S-6
S-3
0
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0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
5-1 P. Hutchinson - G. Flear
5-4 G. Flear - J. Porte
Derby 1 987
Ales 2003
13 ... gxf4 14.exf4 i.xf4!
13.ig5
White dare not capture the bishop: 1 5 .gxf4
�h4t 1 6. cj,?e2 �f2t.
The disposition of Black's forces doesn't allow
him to fully parry the direct threats.
1 5.he4 ixe4 16J:U1 id6 17.ttld2 f5
With an extra pawn and excellent game.
5-2 G. Flear - G. Lawton
Leicester 1 987
23.ttlxc5! ttl ef6
If 23 . . . dxc 5 , the reply 24.�xc5 forks c8 and
f8 , whereupon 24 . . . tt'l e7 2 5 .d6 tt'l xd6 26.�xd6
yields a bi g advantage for White.
24.tLl e6 he6 25.dxe6 fxe4 26.YHc7 ttleS
27.tLlxe4! YHf5 2S.Y9b7 YH£4 1-0
1 3 ... g6
Black could try giving up a pawn with
1 3 . . . :8e8 1 4.ixf6 �xf6 1 5 .dxc5 ixc5
1 6.�xh7t cj{f8 1 7.1"lad 1 , but there is no
compensation, for example 1 7 . . . �xb2 1 8 .ia4
and White will win even more material.
14.dxc5 ie7
Or 1 4 . . . bxc5 1 5 .ixf6 �xf6 1 6. '!tl'xd6.
1 5.YHxd8 Elxd8 1 6.tLle5 ib7 17.c6
With a crushing position.
5-5 G. Flear - R. Kuijf
Black resigned before White had a chance to
play 29.1"la7!.
5-3 G. Flear - 0. Touzane
Mompellier 2003
35.YHf6t �gs 36J�g4t!
The pin on the f-file costs Black dear.
36 ... fxg4 37.YHxf2 id6t 3S.tlJf4 gxh3
39.�xh3 h5 40.tLlxh5 1-0
Ramsgate 1 982
36 ... :8xf4t! 37.exf4
Here 37. cj,?e 1 avoids mate, but loses a rook
to 37 . . . '!tl'xh 1 t .
37 ... YHg3t
In the game, 37 . . . 1"lf3t? was actually played,
but the endgame was nevertheless winning for
Black after 3 8 . cj,?e 1 �xh 1 t 39. cj,?d2 �xc l t
40. i> xc l :8xf4 etc.
38.�fl Elf3t
Black mates.
5-6 E. Preismann
-
G. Flear
Lugano 1 983
26.tiJxh7!
At the time, I was fortunate to get away
with a draw after 26.:8xf8? Elxf8 27.1"ld 1 h6
28.1"lxd3t cj,?e7 29 .1"le3t i>d7 30.1"ld3t.
26 ... 1"lxe8 27.ttlf6t
Black may as well resign .
•
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
5-7
5-1 0
8
7
7
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
•
a
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5-8
0
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5-1 1
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5-1 2
5-9
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0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
5-7 J. Viret - G. Flear
5-9 G. Pech - G. Flear
Laragne-Monteglin 200 1
Narbonne-plage 2002
1 2 ... exd4
The e-pawn advance nets a piece . . .
White has tactical weaknesses along the
e-file.
2 1 . ..e 5 22.ie3 e4 0-1
5-10 G. Flear - D. Coleman
13.llJxd4 h6 14.ih4 :axe3 1 5.1£2 :aes 16.g3
id7
British League 2003
With a clear pawn to the good.
17.b4!
5-8 G. Flear - J. Mourgues
Laragne-Monteglin 200 I
A surprise.
17 ...'?5a3
29.'1Wxa7! :axa7
If 1 7 . . . lt:lxb4, then 1 8 . ttJ e7t 'it>h8 1 9 .ttJxc8
Ei:xc8 20.Ei:xd6 with the exchange to the good.
It's even worse to take the rook: 29 . . . l:hc2
30.ttJxc2 1lffxc2 3 1 .1!ffxe7.
18.bxc5 exd5 19.cxd5 llJa5 20.cxd6 Vffxd6
2 1 .i.d3 b5 22.h3 ixf3 23.Vffxf3
30.:axc8 :ab? 3 1 .b5
Black had no compensation for his pawn .
The position is clearly better for White on
positional grounds, as well as him having an
extra pawn.
5- 1 1 G. Flear - M. Pein
Brussels 1 987
2 1 .if3!
Black's pieces prove to be poorly placed:
2 l . . .i.e8 22.d7 or 2 l . . .i.xf6 22.1lffxf6t <i>h7
23.li:lxc6.
2 1 ...ixf3 22.llJd7! g5 23.Vffe3 Vffb7 24.llJxb8
llJxb8 25.llJxf3
White won a few moves later.
5-12 G. Flear - J. Peist
Lugano 1 988
17.tbd6t! �f8
Mter 17 ... i.xd6 18 .Vffxd6 Black cannot take
the bishop because of mate.
18.Vffd5! h.d6 19.Vffxd6t cj;>gs
The e-pawn is doomed.
20.ixe5 llJxe5 2 1 .Vffxe5
White had no problems converting his
advantage .
•
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
•
5-1 6
5-1 3
8
7
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6
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5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
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0
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5
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4
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3
3
2
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b
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g
h
f
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g
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0
1
��:�
� ./.i �
�
��·�
.�.
lfi"
%--.�-•
�
_ _ - �
,
�
.. .. %
'
----%
. %
,
,-�
� �� ��-''··�
�
�
�z ---,;,1· . %�./ ��
��-Jlll� r��-���-�
�j�� �w�J�zl;:JtJ
mn
�v-�� �:
�� ��
/
�
a
b
c
d
e
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f
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5-1 8
5- 1 5
0
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5-1 7
5- 1 4
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•
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•
Glenn Flear
5- 1 3 G. Flear - S. Bell
Tactimania
q;xd7 1 5.ltle2 !'i:ab8 16.b3 !'i:bc8 17.f3 ltlc3
1 8.ltlxc3 !'i:xc3 19.q;d2 !'i:c6 20.!'i:acl
Blackpool 1 98 8
With two extra pawns.
1-0
20J'�d5! Wfa4
Otherwise, 20 . . . E!xd5 2 l .exd5t �xd5 loses
a piece to 22 .�xb4; whereas after 20 . . . �xa2
2 1 .Wc6t! �e7 22J''lh d 1 White's attack is
winning.
5-16 M. Kazhgaleyev - G. Flear
Aix-en-Provence (rapid) 2004
2 1 .�c5 �xeS 22Ji:xc5
16.l£lxe5!
The threat oHk6t will cost Black too much
material .
16 ... dxe5 17.he7! �xe7 18.d6 1-0
An unpleasant surprise!
1-0
5-17 G. Flear - G. Maupin
5- 14 G. Flear - M. Rayya
St Affrique 2005
Le Havre 1 989
6.rfb3!
10.ltlxe5! �xe2 1 1 .ltlxc6
Forking f7 and b7.
Black loses a piece in all lines.
1 1 . ..hd1 1 2.ltlxd8 �h5 1 3.ltlxb7 �b6
14.c5 dxc5 15 ..ia3 !'i:ab8 16.ltlxc5
6 ...e6 7.rfxb7 ltl bd7 8.Wfxc6 �c8 9.rfa6 rfc7
10.�d3 �xd3 1 1 .rfxd3 �b4 1 2.ltlge2
White has a two pawn advantage.
White is able to retain his extra piece.
1-0
5- 1 8 D. Marholev - G. Flear
San Sebastian 2005
5- 1 5 G. Flear - M. Fortea
9 ...hl2t! 10.q;xh2 rfxd4 1 1 .ltlxd4 �xc4
1 2.!'i:dl 0-0-0
Narbonne-plage 2004
8.he7 rfxe7 9.l£lxd5!
Punishing Black for his slack opening play.
9 ... cxd5 10.Wfxc8t Wfd8 1 1 .ib5t q;e7
12.rfxb7t ltld7 1 3.rfxd7t rfxd7 14.Ld7
I
�
•
Black has won a pawn and obtained
a comfortable game, bur converting the
advantage will be difficult with the presence of
opposite-coloured bishops.
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
5-1 9
5-22
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
0
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5-20
•
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a
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a
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a
•
5-23
8
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5-2 1
•
0
5-24
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0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
5-19 G. Flear - I. Stork
5-22 L. Gachon - G. Flear
Marseille 2006
Montpellier 200 1
19.ltle6! �xh7
Rather than 1 9 . . . fxe6 20.�xg6#.
32... gxb2t 33.�a1 gxa2t!
The coup de grace.
20J3h1 t �g8 21 .ltlxd8 gaxd8 22J9e2
34.lLlxa2
Black doesn't have enough compensation for
the queen, but was able to drag the game out
for a long time.
34...ie5
Or 34.\t>b l �b2#.
The queen is pinned and lost.
0-1
5-20 M. Dziuba - G. Flear
5-23 G. Flear - D. Ladau
Montpellier 2006
Narbonne-plage 2002
40.ltlxe4! �g8
The main point behind White's previous
move is that 40 . . . dxe4 is well met by 4 1 .�h 5 t
�g8 42 .�xg6.
1 8.lLlxb5! ltlc4
41.ltlc3 ltle7 42.ib3
Black is faced with the loss of a second
pawn.
The loss of a pawn renders Black's task
difficult, and he was unable to save himself in
the actual game.
Or 1 8 . . . cxb5 1 9 .ixb 5 t .
19.lLld6t �f8 20.fic3
1-0
5-24 G. Flear - J. Plaskett
5-21 F. Kwiatkowski - G. Flear
London 1 986
Great Yarmouth 2007
22.lLlxe4! ltlxe4 23.fid5
36 ... ga2 37.lLl ef3
23 ... lLlf6
37 £5! 38.g4
24.fixe5t fixeS 25.ixe5 ltld5 26.a3
If 38.exf5 , then 38 . . . e4 and one of the steeds
is lost.
The endgame is probably winning for
White.
•..
38 ... fxe4 39.gxh5 exf3 40.ltl c4
White sheds a piece following 40.ltl xf3 ,
e. g . 40 . . . E1xf2t 4 l .�g3 tt:l e4t 42.�g4 E1g2t
43. 'it>h4 g5t 44.tt:lxg5 tt:l xg5.
40...E1xf2t 41 .�g1 gg2t 42.�fl ltle4 0-1
•
The fork enables White to regain the piece
under highly favourable circumstances.
The white knights are not very securely
placed, so creating an additional threat is
enough to rip the first player over the edge . . .
2 3 . . . tt:l xf2? loses t o 24.ixe5.
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
5-28
5-25
8
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5-29
5-26
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5-30
5-27
•
0
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0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
S-2S P. Piat - G. Flear
S-28 S. Smagin - G. Flear
Bagneux 1 986
Zenica 1 987
17 ...i.xeS!
2S.gxd6!
The possibility of a fork on f3 enables this
combination to work.
Exploiting the fact that Black's queen cannot
defend everything at once.
1 8.f4
2S '?:!fxd6 26.hcS '?:!!xeS 27.'?:!txf6 gf8
28.gd1
•..
No better is 1 8 .ixe5 '1Mfxe5 1 9 .'1Mfxe5 lLlxf3t
20.<;t>f2 lLlxe5 etc.
White is well on the way to victory.
18 ... ixc3t 19.bxc3 idS 20J:hdS cxdS
21.'?:!fxdS eS 22.fxeS '?:!fxc3t 23.Wf2 gadS
S-29 G. Flear - M. Nezar
Black won a few moves later.
S-26 G. Flear - C. Jost
Le Touquet 1 986
French League 2000
16.liJxdS!
A neat pawn grab!
16 llJxdS
•..
1 8.lL!e4!
A neat intermediate move that ensures the
win of material .
1 8 .. .'�e7?
Black also loses heavily after 1 8 . . . bxc2?
1 9 .lLlxf6t
<Jle7
( 1 9 . . . <;t>d8
20.ixa5t)
20. lLlxg8t.
Th e way t o limit the damage was with the
sad retreat 1 8 . . . 1M.'d8 , which only sheds the
b-pawn after 1 9 .4J xf6t '\Mfxf6 20.'1Mfxb3.
1 6 . . . Wxc2? loses to 1 7.lLlxe7t <;t>h8 1 8 .�xc2
�xc2 1 9 .ixc2 �e8 20.ib4!.
17.'?:!fxc7 gxc7 18.gxc7 ltJxc7 19.lLlxd7
White regains the piece and is a solid pawn
up.
19 ... gds 20.lLleS lLldS 21 .gcl gcs 22.gxc8t
lL!xc8 23. Wfl
In the game, White went on to win.
S-30 G. Flear - C. Flear
19.lL!xf6 Wxf6 20.i.c3t We7 21.'?:!te4t 1-0
S-27 G. Flear - J. Gutierrez Castillo
Dubai Olympiad 1 986
28 ... '?:!fxc3!
A bolt from the blue!
29.'?:!tfl
The mates following 29.ixc3 �b 1 t and
29.'\Mfxc3 ixc3 30.ixc3 �b I t are devastating
from White's point of view!
29 ... i.xa6 30.i.xc3 i.xf1 3 1 .i.xd4 cxd4
32.Wg1 i.c4
Black has won a piece .
•
Narbonne-plage 2000
20.h3!
Black's position seems to be holding together
by a thread, so it's sufficient to create one more
problem and everything falls to pieces!
20 liJh6 21 .ixa6 c4t 22.'?:!te3
..•
White blocks the check whilst attacking the
knight on h6.
22 ... '?:!txa6 23.ixh6 :Bd3 24.'?:!1£4 cxb3
2S.ixg7 Wxg7 26.cj;lh1 1-0
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
5-34
5-3 1
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5-32
0
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5-35
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5-33
8
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•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
5-3 1 G. Flear - G. Krahenbuhl
5-33 F. Tabut - G. Flear
Zug 1 98 5
Caen 1 98 5
23 ... gxf3!
22.tLlc5!
The knight enters the fray.
22...\WbS?!
After 22 . . . dxc5 23.bxc5 Wia7 24.c6 Wic7
2 5 . d6! White is on top, for example 25 . . . Wixd6
26."�xd6 lt:Jxd6 27.cxd7 �xd7 28 .�xa8 E!xa8
29.E!fd l .
The best chance for Black would have been
22 . . . lt:Jxc5! 23.bxc5 Wff e7 24J'!fc l a5 2 5 .E!b6
when Black avoids a loss of material, although
he would still be under some pressure.
23.tLle6
At the time, I cracked up completely:
23 . . . Wie3t? 24. 'it>b 1 E!h6?? (24 . . . E!d6 was still
playable) 2 5 .E!d8t 'it>e7 26.Wig8 Wif2 27.'Wf8t
'it>e6 2 8 . lt:J g5 t 1 -0.
24.gxf3
Unlike in the game, after 24.E!d8t 'it>e7
2 5 .'Wh8, it's White who gets mated: 2 5 . . . E!fl t
26.'it>d2 E!f2t 27.'it>d3 'Wc4t 28.'it>e3 'Wf4t
29.'it>d3 E!d2#.
24...\We3t 25.gd2 gds
The rook is lost.
The knight rules the neighbourhood!
23 .. J3e8 24.E!fcl tLl b6 25.tLlc7 .id7 26.tLlxe8
Le8
5-34 G. Flear - C. Morrison
Ramsgate 1 982
White won easily.
34.tLla8!
5-32 G. Flear - D. Pira
Cap d'Agde 1 98 5
16.ixh7t
A thematic sacrifice, but here White i s less
concerned about an attack than the win of
material. The point is that the knight on b8 is
undefended.
Using the whole board!
34 .. ,gd7 35.Lc5! dxc5 36,gxb7!
Black's disorganized forces are unable to hold
out for long.
36 .. ,gxb7 37.\Wcst \Wd8 38.\Wxb7 Wid7
39.tLl c7t @£8 40.tLle6t 1-0
5-35 W. Wittmann - G. Flear
Graz 1 984
I6 ... @xh7 17.\Whst @gs 18.\Wes d4?
Better was 1 8 . . . f6, but after 1 9 .Wixb8 White
is j ust a clear pawn to the good. However,
Black would then have some hope due to the
presence of opposite-coloured bishops.
Exploiting a tactical opportunity to snatch
a pawn.
19.Ld4 f6 20.\Wxb8 E!a6
21 .he5
Otherwise, 20 . . . E!b7 2 1 .Wid6 E!d7? doesn't
work due to the capture on e6, 22.Wixe6t , with
check.
2 l .E!xc2? isn't a wise option, as 2 l . . .lt:Jd3
22.E!xe8t E!xe8 23 .'Wg 1 E! e 1 leaves Black with
an even greater material advantage.
2I .E!adl \We7 22.\WbS \We8 23.\Wxe8 gxe8
24 .ic3
21 . .. gxe5 22,gxe5 fxe5 23.gxe5 ge8
24,gxe8t \Wxe8 25.h3 \Wei t [email protected] WieSt
White had few problems converting his
advantage.
Black has decent winning chances but, in the
game, my opponent's stubborn defensive play
enabled him to scrape a draw.
•
•
20 ... hc2!
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
5-36
5-39
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
5-37
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
5-40
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
3
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
5-38
0
5-4 1
8
8
7
7
6
0
5
5
4
4
3
3
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
5-36 G. Flear - B. Chatalbashev
5-39 G. Flear - C. Ward
French League 200 1
Hastings 1 98 8
19 ... ll.Jxc3!
54 ...'1We2t!
My opponent wasn't impressed by my
attempt at a pseudo-pin along the a8-h 1
diagonal!
The actual game ended in White's favour
with 54 . . . \Wc2t? 5 5 .Wh3 \Wf5 t ? (A second
error, as Black could still have held with
55 . . . e2! 56.E!e7 \Wd 1 57.Wh2 1lf1c2 5 8 .Wh3=)
56.g4 \Wxf4 57.\Wb 1 t 1 -0.
20.ixb7
Better than 20 .\Wxc3 �xf3 2 l .gxf3 \Wh3
22.e4 E!e6, when White would be facing a
crushing attack.
20 ... ll.Jxd1 2l .ixaS ll.Jxfl!
55.�h3 ig4t 56.�h4 ih5
With two threats, i.e. mate on g4 as well as
the rook on e8.
57.�h 1 t
An example of a desperado.
22.Wfxfl :BxaS 23.:Bd1 :BeS 24.:Bd3 g6
If 57.g4 then simply 57 . . . �xe8.
57 ...ig6 5S.:BhSt �xh8 59.�xg6 �h2t
60.�g4 h5t! 1-0
Black has emerged with an extra pawn.
5-37 P. Tregubov - G. Flear
And wins.
Clermonr-Ferrand 2003
5-40 G. Flear - G. Milosevic
Lugano 1 98 8
22.:Bd7t!
A pretty deviation! Black loses a pawn
whatever he now tries.
14.ia6!
Winning material in all lines.
22...Ld7
14 ... ll.Jxe5
Or 22 . . . Wb8 23 .E!xf7.
23.ll.Jxa6t �d6 24.ll.Jxb4 :BaS 25.:Bd1 t �c7
26.b3 ie6 27.�h2
White went on to win.
Capturing White's bishop with 1 4 . . . �xa6
fails to 1 5 .l2Jxc6 \Wd6 1 6.t2Jxe7t and defending
his own by 14 . . . \Wc8 , doesn't work either:
1 5 .�xb7 \Wxb7 1 6.t2Jxc61lf1xc6 1 7.E!xe7.
5-3S P. Guyot - G. Flear
15.Lh7 ll.Jg6 16.i.xf6 ixf6 17.ixaS '!Wxa8
French League 1 987
White was able to use his extra exchange in
winning the game.
25.d6!
Opening lines whilst destabilizing
coordination in Black's camp.
the
25 ... :Bxd6
2 5 . . . cxd6 26.E!e7 is even worse.
26.ixd6 \Wxd6 27.'!Wb4 '!Wc6 2S.�xf4 b6
29.a4 ib7 30.a5 bxa5 3 l .:Be5 :BdS 32.:Bxa5
1-0
With a winning attack as well as a material
advantage.
5-41 G. Flear - N. Giffard
Paris 1 988
22.ll.Jxd6!
Undermining the outpost on e5 and winning
a pawn to boot.
22... �xd6 23.ixe5 :Bxfl t 24.�xfl ixe5
25.:Bxe5 '!Wf6t 26.if3 �aS 27.:Be2 �f5
2S.'!We5
And White won .
•
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
5-42
5-45
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
5-43
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
5-46
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
5-44
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
5-42 D. Gelis - G. Flear
5-44 G. Flear V. Bologan
Lattes 2005
French League 2004
-
26 ... llhe4!
30 .. ,ge l !
Removing the defender of the advanced
white knight and so winning a pawn.
A killing move!
Also promising is 30 . . . WI'xc l t 3 l .�xc l Ele l t
32. <i>c2 tt:lxf3 33.ixf8 Ei:fl ! with a clearly
advantageous endgame.
White resigned here, as there is no hope
after:
27Jhe4 '\Wxf5 28J�cel
28 .Wi'e2 is best met by 28 . . . Ei:ed8! , e.g. 29 .ixe5
(29.tt:lxe5 ixf2t!) 29 . . . ixf2t! 30.<i>xf2 Ei:d2.
28 ... f6 29.c5 ic7
Black went on to win.
3 1 .l3dc3
Or 3 l .Ei:xe l tt:lxf3 .
5-43 G. Flear - D. Collas
St Affrique 2004
3 1 . .. tLl xO 32.gxc4 ctJd2t 33.�al CLlxc4
34.l3xel �xg7
White is a piece down!
24Jhd5!
This, along with correct follow-up,
demolishes Black's central outpost.
5-45 R.M. Taylor - G. Flear
French League 2004
24... exd5 25.'1Wxd5t �h8 26.!0!
White emerges a pawn up.
Instead 26.ig4? doesn't work because of
26 . . . tt:l e3 ! .
29 ... c4!
26 ... g6
Or 30.ic2 cxd3t 3 l .ixd3 f5 32.li:led2 e4
and White drops a piece!
If 26 . . . Ei:b8 27.Ei:xb8 Wl'xb8, there is 28.WI'xf5
which incidentally defends the b 1 -square.
27.'1Wxa8 '!Wxa8 28.ha8 Elxa8
The pawn up pseudo-endgame is highly
favourable, but some technical difficulties
remain.
29.l3b7
More precise is 29.g4 tt:l dG 30.id4.
29.. Jks 30J�b3 gds 3 1 .g4 tt:le7 32.id4
�g8 33 ..L:f6 gdl t 34.�£2 tLld5 35.ie5
l3d2t 36.�g3 �ha2 37.c4 CLle7 38J�b7 tLlc6
39.l3g7t �f8 40.l3c7
Otherwise, White could continue with
40.Ei:xh7, when 40 . . . Ei:c2 4 I .c5 Ei:xc5 (or
4 I . . .tt:lxe5 42.fxe5 Ei:xc5 43.�f4 a5 44.Ei:a7 Ei:b5
45 .h4 Ei:c5 46.<i>g5!) 42 .id6t �g8 43.Ei:c7
Ei:c3t 44.�h4 enables a decisive king invasion.
40 ... tt:lxe5 41 .fxe5 h5 42.gxh5 gxh5 43.h4
�e8 44.�f4 �d8 45.l3h7 l3a4 46.l3xh5
Elxc4t 47.�f5 a5 48,gh7 a4 49.h5 a3
50.ga7 gh4 5 1 . �g5 ge4 52. �f6 gh4
53.l3xa3 l3xh5 54.ga8t �c7 55.e6 gh6t
56.�f7 gh7t 57.�g6 1-0
•
The white pieces are not stable.
30.dxc4
30 ... ixe4 3 1 .cxb5 CLlc5 32.ic4 ixOt
33.�x0 tt:la4 34.ib3 tLl b6
It's a higher priority to block the passed
pawns rhan to win further material.
35.c4 tLld7 36.ia2 f5 37.�e3 e4 38.b3 ic3
39.ib l �d6 40.ic2 �e5 4 I .idl id4t
42.�e2 ic5 43.0 �d4 44.fxe4 fxe4 45.ic2
tLle5 46.ib l tLld3 0-1
5-46 G. Flear - S. Hmadi
Djerba 1 998
29.'\Wcst gds 30.tLld7!
A nasty surprise for my opponent!
30 .. ,gxc8 3 1 .gxc8t
An intermediate move, that is sometimes
termed a Zwischenzug.
3 1 . .. �h7 32.tLlxb6 1-0
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
•••
5-47
5-50
7
5
4
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
5-48
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
5-5 1
7
7
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
5-52
5-49
8
7
7
6
6
5
0
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
•
Glenn Flear
5-47 J. Plaskett - G. Flear
Leicester 1 986
The main variation is in some ways similar
to the one in the previous note, but not with
regard to the activity of the black rooks!
18 .. J'!xh6!
28 ... gg8! 29.ie3
The sacrifice is only temporary, as Black
rapidly regains his material investment and
furthermore can count on gaining some
interest!
After 29 .Wfg4 E:h6, White's pieces are so
badly coordinated that he would have to settle
for a draw.
19.�xh6 e4 20.�d2
29 ... ggg2
The counterattack is in place!
20.tt:ld4 is strongly countered by 20 . . . �g5
2 1 .Wfh3 �d2.
30.�c6t i>bs 3 l .�e8t i>b7 32.'1Wc6t i>bs
33.�e8t i>b7 1/z-lJ2
20... exf3 2l .ixf3 id7 22.<\i.Je2 ig5 23.�f4
ixf4 24.gxf4 �f6
5-49 G. Flear - J. Nunn
As a general rule, in middlegames one can
think of 'two minor pieces' as a slight material
advantage over 'rook and pawn' . Black has a
positional advantage in that his minor pieces
are well placed to restrain White's rooks and
create some threats of their own.
The remaining moves demonstrate Black's
superiority.
25J�b6 ge8 26.geb 1 ic8 27.i>h1 �e4
28.ixe4 fxe4 29.gg1 e3 30.fxe3 i£5
3 l .gg5 h6 32.gg3 ie4t 33.i>g1 �al t
34.i>f2 �h1 35.gxg7t i>xg7 36.�d4t
i>g8 37.gxb7 �xh2t 38.i>e1 �g1 t
39.i>e2 �g2t 40.i>d1 � fl t 4l .i>d2 Wf2t
42.i>d1 if3t 43.i>cl �xe3t 44.�xe3
gxe3 45.gb6 gc3t 46.i>d2 gxc4 47.gxd6
h5 48.i>e3 gc3t 49.i>d4 ga3 50.i>e5 i>f!
5 l .gd7t i>e8 52.ga7 ga5 53.gast i>d7
54.ga7t i>c8 55.f5 ixd5 56.i>d6 ib7
0-1
5-48 0. Jackson - G. Flear
Derby 1 987
26.'1Wxf6t
A natural move, but not the best.
Correct is 26.Wg8t! �e8 27.�xf6t 'tt> c 8
(27 . . . 'tt> d7 allows 28 .Wg4#) 28 .Wxe8t 'tt> b 7
29 .Wc6t 'tt> b 8 30.Wxc4 which gives White
the opportunity to emerge with a significant
advantage. Note that here the rook on a8 is out
of play.
26 ... i>c8 27.'\Wdst i>b7 28.Wxd7
•
Tactimania
Szirak 1 987
White would like to profit from Black's
vulnerable back rank and his loose knight,
but first has to resolve the problem of his own
king's safety.
25.g4!
Threatening the f5-pawn while at the same
time avoiding any potential first rank mates.
Instead, 2 5 .E:b 1 e4 26.g4 (in effect in versing
the order of the moves) leads nowhere after
26 . . . !i:b2!.
25 ... f4
Alternatively, 25 . . . fxg4 loses material after
26.E:b 1 ; whilst if 25 . . . E:b2 26.gxf5 , the f-pawn
will be a major asset.
26.gb1 f3
Black renews the threat along the first rank,
but this shouldn't hold back White for long.
27.if7! e4 28.id5 id4 29.ixb7?
Superior is 29 .�h4! (defending f2) which
is essentially winning, the point being that
29 . . . tt:l d6 loses to 30 .El:b8t 'tt> g7 3 1 .El:g8 t 'it>h6
32.�g5#.
29 ... ixf2t 30.i>h1 i>g7 3 l .ixe4 ge2
Hitting back!
32.ixc5 ixc5 33.ixf3 g£2 34.id5 i>f6
35.gb7 h6 36.h4 i>e5 37.g5 hxg5 38.hxg5
i>f4??
Simply 38 . . . E:f5 should draw.
39.g6 gn t 40.i>h2 gf2t 4l .ig2 ge2 42.g7
ge8 43.id5 ge2t 44.i>h3 ge3t 45.i>h4
ge2 46.gf7t 1-0
Pinching Pieces and Pawns
5-50 C. Bauer - G. Flear
5-52 M. Hennigan - G. Flear
Narbonne-plage 200 1
Hastings 1 987/8
17 ... liJxc3!
17.ig6!!
A significant blow for White.
18.liJxc3 liJd4 19.liJxd4 ixd4 20.id2
Nor does 20.ib2 retain the piece: 20 . . . 1"k8
2 1 .Wid2 (2 1 .li:l d 1 Wig5) 2 l . . .Wfc7 22 .ib3
ixc3 etc.
20..Jl:c8 2I .ib3 ixc3 22.1"1acl ixd2
23J1:Yxd2 'I:Wd6
With a clear pawn more.
Unfortunately, my opponent resisted well
and in time trouble I even managed to lose this
position. That's life!
5-5 1 D. Sellos - G. Flear
Hem 1 984
A superb move that my opponent failed to
find.
The game actually continued with 1 7.1"1xf8t?
1"1xf8 1 8 .ie4 exd4 1 9 .cxd4 d5 20.h3 ic8
2 1 .id3 ixh3 with no problems for Black.
17 ...'1Wxg6
Nor does Black save his pawn with 1 7 . . . ixf3
1 8 .1"1xf8t 1"1xf8 1 9 .ixh5 ixd 1 20.1"1xd l .
18.liJh4! 'I:Wh5
If 1 8 . . . ixd 1 , the damage is even greater, e.g.
1 9 .li:Jxg6t ct?g8 20.1"1xf8t 1"1xf8 2 1 .li:Jxf8 ig4
22.li:lg6.
19.'1Wxg4 'I:Wxg4 20.1"1xg4
White has consolidated his extra pawn and
has a fine game.
15.ib5!
Weaving a web around the black queen.
15 ... llJ e4
Otherwise, 1 5 . . . cxb5 1 6.axb5 would be too
easy for White.
16.ixc6 lDd2 17.'1Wc2?!
An instructive error from my opponent.
The correct choice was 1 7.Wfa2!, with the
point that after 17 . . . li:l xfl 1 8 .ixb7 li:l xg3
1 9 . li:l c6 'I:Wg5 20.li:lxe7t 'I:Wxe7 2 1 .ixa8 White
emerges with a clear extra pawn.
17 llJxfl 1 8.ixb7lL'lxg3 19.liJc6 'I:Wxc3!
•..
A fortunate resource!
20.lDxe7t <;t>hs 21 .'1Wxc3 lDe2t 22.<;t>fl
lDxc3 23.ixa8 !:haS 24.a5 bxa5 25.1"1a3
llJb5 26.1"1xa5 a6 27.llJc6
White has been restricted to a small
advantage.
•
The expression tactical weakness often refers to a piece that is misplaced. Get in the habit of
looking out for any in your opponent's camp, while avoiding them in yours. Exploiting them m ay
involve a direct win of material, or gai ning precious time with a series of threats.
Even when there doesn't seem to be any immediate cause for alarm, having an undefended or
vulnerably-placed unit, can cause serious p roblems elsewhere. If a tactical fl urry breaks out, having
one fighting unit that is a hindrance rather than an asset can make all the difference.
Wise men often advise us to make the effort to improve our 'worst placed piece' , and in this
chapter we will be taking a close look at the consequences when somebody has forgotten to do
j ust that!
•
Punishing Precariously Placed Pieces
M. Drasko - G. Flear
Montpellier 2000
8
27... b5!
7
The rook is ensnared!
6
28.axb6t lLlxb6
5
White then was able to put up some
resistance with . . .
4
29.gc5 hc5 30.lLlxc5 gas 3 1 .lLle6t Wd6
32.lLlxg7 a5
3
2
•
. . . but the damage had been done, and he went
on to lose a few moves later.
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
K. Kojder - G. Flear
Kecskemet 1 982
8
6
Black's pieces are clumsily placed, and White
immediately exploits their unfortunate
configuration.
5
26.h4! lLlge6 27.llJ f5 �h5
7
If 27 . . . �g6 then 28 . .!t:le7t.
4
28,gxc5!
3
The knight on e6 and bishop on f8 are both
overloaded.
2
0
28 ...i.xc5 29.llJxg7 1-0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
And wins.
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
G. Flear - B. Kouady
French League 1 989
The knight on b4 is vulnerable and this leads
to a general malaise in the black camp.
8
14.a3! c4
7
Aiming, if given time, to leap to the d3square.
6
1 5.axb4!
5
4
Naturally, not allowing the opponent to do
what he wants!
3
1 5 ... \'Nxa1 16.tLld4
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
The complications have left the queen
trapped in the corner, and Black now has to
make concessions to stave off an immediate
disaster.
16 ... a5 17.b5
Following 1 7. tt'l c2!? axb4 IS.tt'lxa l bxc3 ,
there would be some, but not really enough,
compensation for the queen.
17...bd4 1 8.'1Wxd4 f6
(diagram)
19.d6!
8
Although Black is now (j ust about) able to
save his queen, White's attention has already
turned to Black's denuded kingside.
7
6
19 ... e6 20.\'Nxc4 a4
5
After 20 . . . :§fe8 2 l .Wie2 :§ac8 22.i.f4 the
queen is doomed after all.
21.\'Nxe6t i:U'7 22.tLld5 a3 23.bxa3 tLle5
If 23 . . . Wie5 , White has 24.tt'le7t cj{g7
2 5 .Wixd7.
4
3
2
0
24.i.f4
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
The losses are too heavy, as White threatens
both tt'l xf6 and the queen.
1-0
•
,
•
Exercises
6-4
6-1
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
6-5
6-2
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
3
3
2
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
6-6
6-3
8
7
7
6
•
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
6- 1 P. Harikrishna - G. Flear
6-4 P. Donelly - G. Flear
Hastings 2002/3
Narbonne-plage 2006
26.�bl!
22... �d4!
Trapping the rook. The game then finished
with . . .
The discovered anack on the rook wins the
exchange.
26. . .i.xb3 27.llJxd2 i.xa2 28.�f4 � bdS
29.�g6t �g8 30.ga3 gc2 3 1 .gxa2 gxd2
32.gxa7 1-0
23.�xd4 Wfxa6 24.�xb5 c6 25.�d4 Wfxe2
26.gxe2 eS 27.�f3 e4 28.�d4 c5 29.�c2
gb6 30.b4 cxb4 3 1 .�xb4 d4 32.�fl gas
33.�el gd6 34.�xe4 dxc3! 35.�xd6 gal#
6-2 G. Flear - D. Griffin
6-5 R. Coste - G. Flear
Uppingham 1 988
Narbonne-plage 20 1 0
32.i.d2! g4b5 33.a4
The rook doesn't have any good squares.
1-0
23 ... gb4!
White loses a piece i n all lines, for example
24.Wfd3 c4 or 24.Wfe2 l:!xb3 25 .l:!xb3 ixc3 .
6-3 C. Vaugeois - G. Flear
Le Havre 1 989
37 ... b5!
24.gxb4 cxb4 2S.Wfxb4 Wfxb4 26.gxb4 gxc3
0-1
6-6 G. Flear - 0. Tocchioni
Giving a pawn in order to get at the poorly
placed rook on c3.
St Vincent 2000
38.gxa5 �b6 39.gal b4 40.gxa6t �xa6
41 .gc4 �bS 42.c3 ga7
17.�c6! WfcS 1 8.�e4
White doesn't have enough compensation
for the exchange.
18 ...Wfxdt
43.d4 exd4 44.cxd4 cxd4 45.gxd4 gc2t
46.�d2 gxb2 47.g3 �cS 48,gd3 gal 49.h4
gxh4 SO.gxh4 gdl S l .�e3 gdxd2!
Simplest.
52.gxd2 gxd2 53. �xd2 �d4 54.g5 fxgS
55.hxg5 g6 0-1
The queen is lost.
1 8 . . . W d5 fails to 1 9 .lLlxe7t ; whilst if
1 8 . . . lLl d4, then the clearest is 1 9 .lLlxc5 lLlxf3t
20.gxf3 with an extra piece.
19.i.xd �xd 20.i.a6
Black's rooks are dominated.
20 ... gae8 21 .0-0 � b3 22.gdl i.h6 23.h3
�g7 24.�xe7! �h8
Or 24 . . . l:!xe7 2 5 .Wf6t �g8 26.Wfxe7.
2S.llJc6 �d7 26.�d6 � bcS 27.�xe8 gxe8
28.ie2 1-0
•
Punishing Precariously Placed Pieces
6-7
6-9
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
6-8
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
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•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
6-7 N. Pert - G. Flear
6-9 G. Flear - B. Radnoti
British League 2003
Fonyod 1 982
71 ...J.f7! 72.�b2 �g5!
22... lDf3t!
White resigned. Black rounds up the knight
whilst keeping at least one of the pawns:
Wins the exchange!
My opponent thought for half-an-hour
before playing 22 . . . g6? and I managed to
hold the game: 23.Wh2 lt:l c6 24.Ei:xd8t \Wxd8
2 5 .J.d5 \Wf6 26.J.xc6 Vfixc6 27.\Wd l \Wf6
28 .'1Wd2 \WeSt 29.f4 \Wxe4 30.'1Wd8t <;t>g7
3 1 .\Wxc7 \Wd4 32.b3 Wb4 33.\WeSt f6 34.\We3
1/2-1/2.
73.lDxh5
Alternatively, 73.lt>c2 <±>g6 and 73 . � e8 J.xe8
74.\t>b3 \t>g4 7 5 .\t>xb4 <±>xg3 are no better.
73 ... �xh5!
The rest is trivial.
74.�c2 �g4 75.�b2 �xg3 76.�c2 �f3
77.�b2 �e3 7S.�c2 �d4 79.�b2 �d3
SO.�b1 �c3 Sl .�a1 b3 S2.�b 1 ig6t
S3.�cl b2t S4.�d1 b l ='!Wt etc.
23.gxf3
23 .Wxf3 Ei:xd2 isn't any better.
23 ...�g5t 24.�fl �xd2
With a clear extra exchange.
6-S C. Flear - M. Sadler
Barnsdale 1 989
6- 10 I. Argandona Riveiro - G. Flear
Montpellier 2005
19.ib5! lDbs
Passive, but Black has a difficult choice, e.g.
19 ... lt:l f6? 20.�xg5 or 19 . . J::\ f7 20.J.xd7 Ei:xd7
2 1 .lLle5 Ei:c7 22.Ei:f7t <±>h8 23.Ei:afl with a
decisive attack.
20.ltJxg5 '!Wxg5t 21.�h1
Black lacks defenders.
21 ... icS 22.'1Wd6 �dS 23.\Wc?t id7 24.e4!
'!We7 25.�ae1 dxe4 26.�b7 lDc6 27.ixc6
gabS 2S.'!Wxa7 e3 29.if3 �aS 30.�c7 1-0
17.lDt2!
Black's pieces are shown to be on awkward
squares.
17 ...ixe5
Following 1 7 . . . \WfS 1 8 .g4 '!Wf6 1 9.g5 \WfS
20.gxh6 gxh6, Black has nothing much for the
piece.
1S . .!iJxh3 ixa1 19.ltJg5 id4 20.ixd4 ig4
21 .hg7!? ixd1 22.�xd1 �hgS 23.ixh6
�d6 24.lDxf7 �f6 25.l0e5 gxh6
The pseudo-endgame is probably lost for
Black.
26.�g2 b6 27.�d2 �f6 2S.�f3 h5 29.�e4
�dS 30.�t2 �d4t 3 1 .�e3 �e6 32.h3 �dS
33.b4 �e7 34.bxc5 bxc5 35,gb2 �dS 36.�b7
gcs 37.g4 hxg4 3S.hxg4 �b6 39.�a7 �d6
40.a4 �e7 41 .g5 1-0
•
Punishing Precariously Placed Pieces
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•
•
Glenn Flear
6- 1 1 V. Hrivnak - G. Flear
Cappelle-la-Grande 1 986
Tactimania
29.id5!
The knight is surrounded.
29 ... :Sad7
24.tLle6!
Or 29 . . . Eixd5 30.1'!c8 t .
A surprise!
Instead 24.Eie2 is ineffective as Black's queen
escapes with 24 .. .1iWa3 2 5 .Eia 1 iWc5 .
24.. .'1Wxc2
Mter 24 . . . 1'!8f7, then 2 5 .Eie2! would indeed
be the move: 25 . . . Eixe6 26.Eixe6 �xe6 27.Eia 1
etc.
30.:Sg6!
Mate is close.
30 ... l!Jf3t 3 1 .i>h1 ltl e5 32.:Sxe5 :Sxd5
33.:Se8t :Sxe8 34.Wfxg7#
6- 13 G. Flear - L. Smart
Ramsgate 1 982
25.Wfxc2 ixc2 26.llJ� <b�
Black has two pawns for the exchange, but is
under pressure as White's rooks are so active.
27.Eife1 g5 28J�e8t <bg7 29.1'! 1e7t l::\ £7
30.Eixf7t i>xf7 3 1 .Eib8 b5 32J�b6 hb3
33J��xc6 a5 34Jhd6 a4 35.:Sa6 <be? 36.i>fl
b4 37.<bel a3 38.i>d2 ic4 39.:Sa4 a2
40.i>c2 i>d6 41 .i>b2 i>c5 42.:Sa5t i>d4
43.:Sxg5 b3 44Jh5 i>d3 45.f4 i>e3 46.f5
i>f2 47.g4 h6 48.:Sc5 1-0
6- 1 2 G. Fiear - J. Emms
Nottingham 1 987
28.a4!
Undermining the knight is the best way
forward.
28 ... llJd2
Instead, after 28 . . . tLl b6, the straightforward
29.axb5 wins a pawn.
Otherwise, 28 . . . tt:J d6 is harder to refute, bur
still doesn't inspire confidence. The following
variations demonstrate Black's difficulties, that
result mainly from the lack of a stable central
outpost for his knight: 29.Eid 1 Elad7 30.\Wc2!
(30.�h3? is however premature because of
30 . . . tt:J e4) 30 . . . g6 3 1 .�h3 f5 (if 3 1 . . .Eie7,
White has 32.1'!dxd6 l'!xd6 33 .1'!c8t) 32.iWb3t
@g7 33 .\We6 bxa4 34.Eidxd6! Elxd6 3 5 .\We7t
<i>h8 36.Eic7.
In this line, Black was obliged to advance
his kingside pawns to support the knight,
whereupon it was his king that became weak.
•
29.l!Jef5t!
Black's king is forcibly exposed.
The inferior 29 .iWxc8 ? tLlxb 1 30.\Wg4 is only
about equal.
29 ... gxf5 30.ltlxf5t i>f6
More resistant than 30 . . . @f8 3 I .iWxc8# or,
for that matter, 30 . . . 'it>g6 3 1 .iWg3t with mate
in two.
3 1 .Wfxc8 llJxf5
Now, if 3 1 . . . tLl xb 1 , White has 32.iWh8t 'it>g5
33.tLlxd4 iWa6 34.h4t! with a crushing attack.
32.Wfxf5t <bg7 33.Wfg4t i>f6 34.W/f5t i>g7
35.Wfg5t i>£8 36.:Scl Wfbs 37.Wfh6t i>gs
38.Wfh3 tLl c4 39.Wfg4t i>£8 40.e5! 1-0
6- 14 S. Schlander
-
C. Flear
Battle 200 1
White's pieces look at first sight to be 'well­
centralized', bur in fact they are just getting in
each other's way.
1 2... b4! 13.ltla4 ixe4! 14.ltlac5
After 1 4 .fxe4 tLl xe4 the queen cannot escape
due to the threat of mate against c2 .
14 ... l!Jxf3 15.ixf3 ix£3 16.ltlxa6 Wfc6
17.llJd4 Wfxa6 1 8.llJxf3 Wfxa2
Or the immediate 1 8 . . . b3.
19.Wfd3 b3 20.llJd4 bxc2 21 .ltlxc2 ib4 0-1
Punishing Precariously Placed Pieces
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•
Glenn Flear
6- 1 5 C. Flear - S. Schlander
Battle 200 1
26.g4! W!'xh3 27.Afl
The queen is trapped.
27 Wfxf3 28.Wfxf3 ixd4 29.W!'g3 c.t>gs
30.Ae3 Axb2 3 1 .gab l Ac3 32.Ac5 Axel
33.gxel a4 34.Ac4 c.t>hs 35.Axb4 gf4
36.Axd5 gxb4 37 .Af7 c5 38.Ag6
.•.
Tactimania
1) One example being 16 . . . �xd5 1 7.�xc5
!!xc5 1 8 .bxc5 '!Wxc5t 1 9 .'1Wd4, and then it
would be time for a rook count!
2) Otherwise Black could try 1 6 . . . �h6, but
this doesn't change matters a great deal, as
1 7.f4 tLl g4 1 8 .�xc5 !!xc5 1 9 .bxc5 '!Wxc5t
20.'1Wd4 yields a winning position.
16 ...Wfxc5t 17.ltJbd4 i.xd5 18.Axd5?!
Surely 1 8 .�b3! .
Certainly not 38 .!!e8 t ? ? because of38 . . . !!xe8
39.�xe8 !!b l t 40.<Jih2 !!h 1 #.
38 .. J:H8 39.g5 ic8 40.f3 gb6 41 .gxh6 gxh6
1 8 ...Wfxd5 19.W!'b3?!
42.ge7 1-0
And Black was better.
I think a lesson that can be gleaned from this
example is the need to keep fully concentrating
after winning material, otherwise . . .
6- 16 G. Flear - I. Nemet
Geneva 1 98 5
It wasn't one of my better days!
19 e5
•..
6- 18 G. Flear - A. Boyne
3 1 ...g3!
Exeter 1 983
M y opponent noticed that the knight on a4
isn't defended.
32.hxg3 Wfdl t 33.c.t>h2 W!'xa4 34JU4 ltJe7
35.Wfxd6 ltJg6 36.!!xf8t ltJxf8
White didn't have enough for his piece.
19.Ag4!
First of all, White attacks the undefended
knight.
19 .. J!d8 20.ltJ b5!
6- 17 G. Flear - J. Duche
Clermont-Ferrand 1 98 5
Then he follows up by attacking the other
steed, as well as the queen.
20 Wfxb2 21.ltJxc7 Wfxc2 22Jhc2 !!ac8
23.Axd7 !!xd7 24.ia5 gdxc7 25.ixc7
:!hc7
..•
15.b4!
A handy fork!
1 5 .id2? favours Black after 1 5 . . . '1Wb6.
1 5 ...W!'b6
If 1 5 . . . '1Wxb4, White threatens the queen
with 1 6.�d2, and Black will drop something,
e.g. 16 . . . '1Wb2 1 7.�c3 or 1 6 . . . '1Wa4 1 7.dxe6.
16.bxc5?
The pin with 1 6.�e3! would have been
correct:
•
White emerges with the exchange for a
pawn.
26.!!bl 6 27.ex6 gx6 28.!!b3 c.t>f7 29.!!e2
ie5 30.!!el c.t>f6 3 1 .g3 c.t>f7 32J3eb l a5
33.!!xb7 !!xb7 34.!!xb7 Ad 35.c.t>fl ib4
36.c.t>e2 c.t>f6 37.g4 fxg4 38.hxg4 h6 39.c.t>f3
c.t>f7 40. c.t>e4 ic3 4 1 . c.t>e; if6 42.f4 ih4
43J'�a7 iel 44.g5 hxg5 45.fxg5 ic3 46.g6t
c.t>£8 47.c.t>g5 Ad2t 4S.c.t>h5 c.t>es 49.!!a8t
1-0
Punishing Precariously Placed Pieces
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6-24
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•
Glenn Flear
6- 19 G. Flear - J. Johansson
Isafjordur/Bolungarvik 1 988
Tactimania
3 1 .hxg5 lLlxh5 32.gxh5 .ic8 33.gxh6 gxh6
34.gg3t @hs 35. c;t>n .ie6
Black has a small advantage.
17.ltJxd6!
6-22 R. Tozer - G. Flear
Exploiting the presence of a poorly defended
knight on e7.
London 1 989
17 ... fxg5
12.<!bxd5! cxd5 13 ..ib3!
After 1 7 . . . W/xd6 1 8 .ixc 5 , White regains
the piece due to the pressure along the a3-f8
diagonal.
Closing the door on the queen before she
bolts!
1 8.hxg5 lLlxg5 19.hg5 \Wxd6 20 . .ie3
1 3 ... tlJxe5 14.c3!
Picking off a pawn.
20 .. J::U7 21 .\Wxc5 \Wf6 22.d6 tlJf5 23.exf5
ixf5 24.ih3
Some sort of a record, as this was the first
piece on White's kingside to move!
24 ...id3 25.\Wd5 e4 26.\WxaSt @h? 27J!d1
\Wh4t [email protected] .ih6 29.l�� h2 .ixe3t [email protected]
\Wf4t 3 l [email protected] \Wxh2 32.\Wd5 \Wb2t [email protected]
lhf3t 34.ltJxf3 \We2t [email protected] \Wxf3t [email protected]
\We3t [email protected] \Wf3t 38 ..if5 @h6 39Jhd3
\Wf4 40.\We5 \Wg5t 4l [email protected] 1-0
Another nail in the queen's coffin.
14 ... ltJxf3t 1 5.gxf3 .ib4 16,gb 1 .ixc3
17.lhb2 ixb2 18.\Wc2 .if6 19.\Wc5 .id7
20 ..ixa5
White won without difficulty.
6-23 A. Harakis - G. Flear
British League 20 1 0
47 ....if4!
The knight is cut off.
[email protected]
6-20 G. Flear - G. Gislason
Isafjordur 1 98 8
If 48.tt:Jd8, then 48 . . . e5 49.'�c2 e4 50.b3
�d6 5 l .a5 �d7 5 2 . tt:J f7 bxa5 and . . . �e7.
48 ... @e6 49.lLld8t @d? 50.lLlf7
19.b4!
Or 5 0 . tLl b7 �c7 etc.
Th e knight on d 7 i s the vulnerable piece, but
first of all White has to 'invite' the other one
to move away.
50 ... @es 0-1
The knight is doomed.
6-24 G. Flear - V. Domenech
19 ... ltJ b7 20.ltJxc6 lhc6 21Jhd7 1-0
Port Barca res 20 1 0
6-21 G. Flear - G. Andruet
Val Maubuee 1 989
A shock as now White's queen is under
pressure.
Black loses a piece.
I actually played the inferior 1 1 .�d2?!, when
in reply Black should have continued with
1 l . . . f4! provoking unclear complications.
30.h4?
1 l ...tlJxg3
30.Elxb7 tt:J f4 3 1 .h4 would have been a lesser
evil.
If 1 l . . .ixg3t , White has 1 2.hxg3 lLlxg3
1 3 .Elh2 ih 5 1 4.W/f2 \Wg5 1 5 .Elh3 and the
knight is out of squares.
29 ... lL! e6!
30... ltJf4
Instead of this tempting move, 30 . . . g6!
would have been essentially winning, e.g.
3 1 .Elxb7 gxh5 32.hxg5 tLlc5 .
•
1 1 .£3!
1 2.hxg3 .ixg3t [email protected] 1-0
This time, it's the bishop that is lost.
Punishing Precariously Placed Pieces
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6-27
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6-28
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•
a
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
6-25 G. Flear - R. Audiffren
6-27 G. Flear - A. Gilbert
Lattes 2009
Telford 1 983
16 . .!thf5!
1 8.e5!
The black edifice collapses.
16 ...ixf5 17Jhc8 �xeS 1 8.Wfxd5t Wfe6
19.i.xe4
White has got away with two pawns.
19 ...�c5 20.Wfxe6t .ixe6 2I.tlJd3! ltJxd3
22 ..ixd6 :gc2 23.:gdl i.c4 24.h4 :gel
25.�xcl ltJxcl 26.a3 b5 27.b4
And White won.
6-26 G. Flear - D. Ladau
Cap d'Agde 2006
1 2.h5!
A combination that targets several loose
pieces.
18 ... dxe5 19.ltJdb5 Wid?
If 1 9 . . .l'hd2, then 20.lt'lxc7 )'%xd l 2 1 .)'%xd 1
with the threat of )'%d8 t, as well as tt:lxa8.
20.Wff2 Wfe7 2 1 .Wfxc5!
For the record, White is also better after
2 1 .)'%xd8t %'xd8 22.%'xc5 cxb5 23.ctJd5 �e6
24. lt'! c7.
2 1 ...Wfxc5 22.�xd8t fi.f8 23.J.xf6 cxb5
24.ltJd5 .ie6 25.ltJe7t Wfxe7 26.fi.xe7 1-0
6-28 G. Flear - J. Purgimon
White shows no piry in hunting down the
bishop.
Andorra 1 98 5
12 ... .if5 13.e4 dxe4 14.fxe4 .ig4 15.:gh4
f5 16.gxf6 tiJxf6 17.:gxg4! ltJxg4 1 8.Wfxe6t
fi.e7 19.Wixg4
In this complicated position, Black's best move
is . . .
With two pieces for a rook, and a good
position.
3 1 ...gcl!
After the move played in the game, 3 1 . . . )'%e2?,
White has to play 32.%'fl ! )'%d2 33.h4 )'%xd5
34.hxg5 �b7 3 5 . W g l with equaliry.
32.Wia5 Wfe2
The main threat is . . . Wfl mate!
33.Widst �g7 34.Wlxg5
Mate is avoided, but the rook is en pris e.
34 ...Wifl t 35.�£3 Wfxa6
With a clear advantage .
•
Punishing Precariously Placed Pieces
6-29
6-30
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•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
6-29 G. Flear - A. Hoffman
6-3 1 G. Flear - D. Anic
San Sebastian 2009
Montpellier 2000
26.ixb5!
1 5.ll:la4!
White sacrifices a piece for two pawns on
the queenside. It's worth noting that this idea
works, as the absence of the knight, sidelined
on h5, handicaps the defence.
Cutting out any possibility of the queen
retreating.
26 ... cxb5 27.c6 icS
After 27 . . . i.e8 ,
28.Wi'c5 .
White
continues
with
28.llhb5 ll:lg7 29.\WcS ll:l eS 30.ll:la7!
It's more important to dominate the black
pieces than to capture a third pawn.
30 ... ll:lc7 3 l .b5 ll:le6 32.'1Wb6 <Jle7 33.'1Wa5
\Wbs 34.b6
Black is out of useful moves.
1-0
15 ... lLlg4
Neither 1 5 . . . Wxc4 1 6. lt:\ b6 nor 1 5 . . . i.e6
1 6.b3 b5 1 7.i.d2 Wi'a3 1 8 .i.c l Wi'xa2 1 9 . lt:l c3
are playable for Black.
16.hg4
Another possibility is 1 6.i.c l ! ? .
16 ...ixg4 17.'1Wc2 ie2 18.b3!
The inferior 1 8 .Wi'xe2 ? Wi'xa4 1 9.b3 Wi'b4
wouldn't have been clear.
18 ...ixf1 19.gxfl
Here 1 9 .i.d2? is dubious,
1 9 . . . :1:1ad8 20.ixb4 id3 .
because
of
19 ... b5
6-30 J. Levitt - G. Flear
Plymouth 1 989
26.ll:l d8!
Black's king is denied the possibility of
escaping by castling long!
The game instead continued with 26.b4?
cxb3 27.:1:k 5 lt:\ d7 (27 . . . b2!) 28.e5 Wi'b6
29.lt:\d6t �d8 30.Wi'f8t! Yz-Yz, in view of
30 . . . lt:\ xf8 3 1 .:1:1xf8t �c7 32.:1:1f7t etc.
26 ...\We? 27.llhe6! g6
The alternative 27 . . . Wi'xe6 loses on the spot
to 28.Wi'f8t �d7 29 J''i: f7 t.
28.\Wf6 Wfxf6 29J!xf6 gcs 30.gxg6
White is winning .
•
If 19 .. J:!ad8 , then 20 .i.c l with the threat of
a2-a3 .
20.id2 bxa4 2 I .ixb4 axb3 22.axb3 cxb4
23J!d1 �eSt 24.<Jlfl �e3 25.g3 c5 26J!d7
id4 27.e5
With a clear advantage to White.
27 ...a4 28.bxa4 geb8 29.'1We4 b3 30.\WdS
gm 3 U hf7 <Jlhs 32.gxffit gxm 33.Wfb7 b2
34.<Jle2 gds 35.a5 ic3 36.a6 ib4 37.\We4
g6 38.e6 ic3 39.a7 <Jlg7 40.\Wb?t <Jlh6
4I .g4 g5 42.e7 gd2t 43.<Jle3 ib4 44.\Wc6t
<Jlg7 45.e8=lLit 1-0
A neat under-promotion to finish the
chapter!
Blunders are unforced errors, often resulting in dramatic consequences.
Naturally, we try to avoid making them , but unfortunately they will inevitably creep into our
play from time to time. Our adversaries will also make such oversights, but in order to exploit
them, you will need to latch onto a tactical point that has been overlooked!
There is generally no particular problem in cashing i n when one's opponent kindly falls into a
prepared trap. However blunders are not always immediately obvious.
Stay alert to any tactical themes in the air, trust your instinct, and if you sense that one of your
opponent's moves somehow feels wrong, let your tactical imagination run wild!
If you are ready and willing to seek refutations of your opponent's moves, you are more likely to
find one when it really matters!
A typical case is when facing a highly-ranked player, who is playing his moves quickly and
confidently. This doesn't mean he has calculated all the lines correctly! Don't trust your opponent
bli ndly, even the strongest GMs make blunders occasionally.
H owever, first of all, a word of warning. If you think that you have a great tactical shot available,
think twice and check your analysis again ! Has your opponent j ust blundered, or is he setting a
cunning trap?
In certain exercises in this chapter, I will be asking more specific questions. Here are some typical
examples:
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
M.H. Pham - G. Flear
Marseille 2004
8
6
Black has j ust played 37 . . . a5. A plausible
question could be: What did he overlook?
The reply is the manoeuvre . . .
5
38.ttld4t! �c5 39.ttl c2!
7
. . . when Black's pieces are poorly placed.
In fact, in the game I was lucky that this
oversight didn't cost me a piece, as I had a
resource . . .
4
3
2
39 ... c!lJ a4!
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
. . . but after. . .
40J�xb5t! �xb5 41 .ttlxa3t �b4 42.ttlc2t
�c4 43.ttl d4
. . . winning chances were minimal and White
was able to draw a few moves later.
K. Arkell - G. Flear
British League 2005
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
In the following example, my error turned
out to be fatal.
Here a possible question could be:
Black must choose between 40 . . .<±>h7 and
40 . . . E:xa5, which is preferable?
Before making a definite choice, you
should calculate and compare these so-called
'candidate moves', j ust as you would do in a
real game!
40 .. Jha5??
This (notorious 40th move!) loses on the
spot and, unfortunately, was the move I made
in the game!
In fact, Black should take his king off the
eighth rank: 40 . . . c;i>h?! 4 I . tLl e2 (4 I .iWxf8 is
met by 4 l . . .exd4; while after 4 I . tLl c6, the
bishop is no longer pinned and Black can
play the freeing 4 l . . .�a3) 4 1 . . .1&f3 42.1&xf8
E:d2! 43.E:e 1 f6! The game is about equal.
41.ttlc6 gb5 42.ttl e7t �h7 43.�xf8 1-0
In the exercises that follow, you should first of all carefully read any accompanying text. Sometimes
a move is made in the diagram position, before you are required to make your choice, see for
example the first exercise .
•
Exercises
7-3
7-1
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
7-2
a
h
I played 1 8.ih3.
How do you think my opponent replied?
•
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Just after the time control, I rushed to play
4Ll:td3 in order to go to the toilet.
What was my opponent's reply?
7-4
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
My opponent opted for 28.llJd3, but why
did he regret his choice?
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
After my 42.�f2, my opponent didn't take
long to win. How did he continue?
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
7- 1 G. Flear - M. Leski
7-3 G. Flear - C. Ward
Geneva 1 98 5
Southend 2009
4L�d3??
1 8 ..ih3??
was a dreadful blunder as after. . .
1 8 ... ltlxd4!
. . .I resigned! The position is hopeless, for
example:
19 ..ixd7 ltlxb3 20J::�ab l ltld2 etc.
loses immediately!
4 l .Wlb3 was correct, with a certain advantage
to White .
4l ... �c8!
. . . and mate is forced.
42.�d2
7-2 L. Cernousek - G. Flear
British League 2008
Or 42.e8=Wf E:c l #.
42 .. J:kl t 43.';!?e2 WeSt 44.�f2
44.�d3 allows mate in one with 44 . . .Ek3#.
28.ltld3??
is refuted by. . .
44 ... Wxelt 45.�g2 Wxd2t 46.�h3 �hlt
47.�g3 Wfh2t 48.�g4 �gl#
2 8. . .cxd3! 29.Wfxc8 Wfc2!
7-4 G. Flear - I. Gonzalez Menendez
On the other hand, 29 . . . d2? is a mistake due
to 30 . .id6! .
30.'1Wxc2 dxc2
. . . and Black wins.
Spanish League 2005
42.Wf2??
loses quickly.
Bener was 42.E:d2 when the position would
have stayed unclear.
42 ...Wfe6t 43.f5 We4t 44.�h5
No better is 44.Wlf4 Wfg2t 4 5 . � h 5 Wfxh3t
46.Wlh4 Wfxf5 47.Wfd4t E:e5 .
44 .. J�xh3t 45.�g6 West 46.�£6 �h7
47.Wfc5 �f'7t 48.�g6 ge7t
And Black wins.
·"
, ,.
•
Blunder-bashing
7- S
0
7-7
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
0
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What should White do here?
d
e
f
g
h
•••
7-8
a
c
Black played 58 'l!!fc7, but soon realized
the error. So what's the problem?
Black has a serious threat. What should
White do to avoid a disaster?
7-6
b
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
I played 34 �c6 and my
opponent had a chance to win.
How should White reply?
•..
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
7-5 T. Meynard - G. Flear
7-7 V. Moskalenko - C. Flear
Avignon 2005
Cap d'Agde 1 994
37J�c8t!
58 ...'1Wc7??
In the game, my opponent lost a piece:
37.<;iJe3 ?? �b3t 3 8 .cj;Jd2 �d3t 39.mc2 �xd6,
and the game a few moves later.
37.Wg3 ? ? also loses: 37 . . . �b3t 3 8 . f3 �b2
and mate is nigh.
Possible is 37.�c3?!, but after 37 . . . �xb4 the
position would be only equal.
loses a piece to . . .
59.l!Jxd6! '!Wxc4
Neither 5 9 . . . lLlxd6 60.�xc7 nor 5 9 . . . �xd6
60.�xf7# offer any salvation.
60.lbxc4 0-1
7-8 P. Walden G. Flear
-
37 ... �e7 38.liJf5t �d7 39.Ek3!
White holds everything together
furthermore, retains winning chances.
Cardiff 1 983
and,
39 g6
For the record, instead of my. . .
34 ... llJ c6?
..•
If 39 . . . lLl e6! ? , then 40.�a3 �xb4 4 1 .lLlxg7! .
40.llJxh6 �xb4 41 .g5!
With a riskless advantage to White.
7-6 N. Devals - G. Flear
Sr Affrique 2007
1 5.tDg3!
White attacks rwo pieces at once!
My opponent instead blundered at this
point with 1 5 .�d 1 ?? �h4 1 6.g3? �xe4 and
then resigned.
15 ... \Wf6 16 ..ig5! '!WxgS 17.\WxeS g6 18.tDe4
White has a significant advantage.
. . .the correct move was 34 . . . �c2! , for example
3 5 .1Mfxd4 �xc7 36.�xc7 �xd5 37.�xd5 mxc7
38 .�xf7t mds 39 .�g8t me7 40.�h7t me6!
with drawing chances.
35.llJ b4!
Demolishing Black's defences.
My opponent blundered in turn with
3 5 .�xf7?? and after 35 . . . �xd5 Black was
winning.
35 ... \Wa4
If 3 5 . . . lLl xb4 36.l"k8t White mates.
36.tDxc6t bxc6
If 36 . . .'i'hc7, simply 37.tLlxd8t.
37J!xc6
Threatening �eSt .
•
Blunder-bashing
7-9
•
7- 1 1
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Black should choose between 34 . . . '\Wxe7
and 34 .. J:\xd4. Which one is correct?
7- 1 0
7- 1 2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Why was the move played in the game,
25 tLle6, unwise?
•••
•
Glenn Flear
7-9 G. Flear - A. Muir
7- 1 1 C. Flear X. Parmentier
Uppingham 1 98 8
Montpellier 2003
My opponent punished my previous slack play
with . . .
In the game, 34 . . . �xe7?? lost quickly: 3 5 .l'l:xd7
l'l:xd7 36.�c3t @g8 37.�c8t 1 -0.
Instead, Black should have opted for. . .
23 ...\Wxd2 24 ..ixd2 .ia6
. . . with a powerful pin.
25.�xh4
The alternative 2 5 .ic2 is too passive:
25 . . . l'l:ac8 26.ib 1 lt'l e 5 and Black wins the
exchange anyway.
25 ...i.xf1 26.gxfl ge2 27.icl gae8 28.ic4
gel
Black went on to win.
-
34 .. J�xd4! 35.exd8=\Wt
Here, 3 5 .l'l:xd4 �xe7
37.�xf7 would be similar.
36.:1l:xd8t
But not 35 . . . �xd8?? 36.�c3 .
36.gxd8t \Wxd8 37.\Wxfl a6
When the endgame would probably be
drawn.
7- 12 G. Flear - M. Godena
Basque League 2004
French League 2003
26.bxa6! bxa6
After 26 . . . lt'l xc5 27.a7 the pawn promotes!
27.gc6
Black loses a pawn and essentially all hope of
saving the game.
27 ... �d8 28.gxa6 gd3 29.'it>e2 gb3 30.ga8t
gbs 3 1 .gxc7t! 'it>xc7 32.J.f4t 'it>c6 33.gxb8
�e6 34 ..ig3 f5 35.a5 fxe4 36.fxe4 gg5
37.gh6t 'it>d7 38.gd6t 'it>e7 39.gd5 1-0
�xd8
35 ... gxd8!
7- 10 J. lruzubieta - G. Flear
Instead of 25 . . . lt'l e6??, I should have played
25 . . . axb5 26.axb5 lt'l e6, which limits any white
advantage to a positional pull.
•
Tactimania
28 ...\Wd3
Pin and win!
29.\Wxd3 J.xd3 30.J.d2
Or 30.Ek l ia3 etc.
30 ... gc2 3 1 .gdl gxa2 32.'it>el ixe2
Possible is 32 . . . ic2 33.:!:'k l ia3 , but my
opponent found a convincing way.
33. 'it>xe2 J.h4 34. 'it>d3 gxd2t 35.gxd2 J.xd2
36. 'it>xd2 'it>£8 0-1
The endgame is a trivial win, for example
37.i>d3 @e7 38 [email protected] i>d6 [email protected] at5 40.g4
b5 4 1 .h4 a4 42. bxa4 bxa4 43.h5 a3 [email protected]
a2 4 5 .i>b2 @e5 46.f3 d4 47.exd4t @xd4
48.i>xa2 @e3 etc.
Blunder-bashing
7- 1 3
••
7- 1 5
••
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
I f White continues with l O.tiJ£3,
can Black capture on e4 with confidence?
7- 1 6
7- 1 4
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
White continued here with 17.1Wd3.
Is this reasonable or bad?
•
Glenn Flear
7- 13 G. Flear - H. Hamdouchi
Narbonne-plage 2003
32.ic7
Otherwise 32.l"!xd5 cxdS 33 .ic5 should also
be good enough to win.
32 ... gc8 33J&e7
I played . . .
10.� f3??
White is clearly winning .
. .. and quickly regretted my choice!
Correct in this position is 1 O . lt:J ge2 0-0
1 1 .0-0 ltJ bd7 1 2.h3 with normal development,
and a small space advantage to White.
10 ... �xe4!
Black can indeed lop off the pawn.
1 l .�xe4
The point is that 1 1 .'1Wa4t id7 1 2 .'1Wxe4 is
refuted by 1 2 . . . ixc3t . White must resort to
1 3 . lt:J d2 to avoid dropping his queen, but he is
then j ust a pawn down.
1 l ...'?;Yxe4t l 2.Wfl 0-0 1 3J&e1 '?;Yb4 14.®g1
ig4
White has no compensation for the pawn.
7- 14 D. Collas - G. Flear
Montpellier 2003
23.id6!
Threatening both 24.ixf8 and 24.ib4.
23 ... � b5
It's even worse to move the rook: 23 . . Ji:fc8
24.ib4 '1Wa4 2 S .ixc3 .
24.ix.f8 gx.f8 25.ixb5 '?;Yxb5
With a difficult position for Black.
26.gfd1 ics 27.gab 1 WaS 28.gbcl ib7
29.Wg3 h6 30.Wc7 ia8 3 l .We7 Wa6 32.ge1
Wa4 33.Wd6 ge8? 34.Wd7 1-0
The d4-d5 advance is coming.
7- 1 5 G. Pearce - G. Flear
Cardiff 1 983
3 l .id3!
The threat of mate on the back rank enables
him to retain both bishops.
In the game, 3 l .ixc6? ? ixc6 32 .ic5 f6
33 .l"!e7 l"!b7 was insufficient to win.
3 l ...f6
White now has a
continuations .
•
Tactimania
choice of decisive
7- 16 G. Flear - S. Shelev
Slanchev Briag 1 983
17 Wd3??
is an error.
Better would have been 1 7 id2 with a
balanced game.
17 ... �xc3 1 8.bxc3 ie4!
Not only is any attack stopped in its tracks,
but White also loses a pawn!
19.Wb5 hb 1 20.Wxb 1 gxc3 2 l .ib2 gcs
22.Wd3 Wd5 23.a4 gc7 24.gcl grcs 25.h3
i.d6 26.Wa6 gxcl 27.ixcl gc7 28.l£Jf3
Wc4 0-1
Blunder-bashing
7- 1 7
•
••
a
7- 1 9
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
Black should choose between
1 6 . . .'®a5 and 1 6 . . . \Wb?. Which
one would you go for?
7- 1 8
•
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Black should choose between 47 . . . d3,
47 . . . E!h4t 48.�g l d3 or 47 ... \Wf6. One
of these three is a blunder, which is it?
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
White has to decide between 39.E!d4,
39.e6 or 39.E!d7. One of these three
is a blunder, which is it?
7-20
a
••
0
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
White has three candidate moves,
1 3 .lLl xb5 , 1 3 .i.xb5 , and 1 3 . 0-0.
Which of these options is not advisable?
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
7- 17 S. Arkell - G. Flear
7- 19 E. Pigusov - G. Flear
Hastings 1 986/7
Aosta 1 989
16 ...Wfb7?
39.�d7??
The only good move here is 1 6 . . . Wfa5 ! , which
would offer Black a satisfactory position.
A terrible blunder that throws away a
winning game!
White could have won with either of the
suggested alternatives:
I ) 39.e6 Elg3 40.e7 '1Wxe7 4 l .WI'c5.
2) 39 .Eld4 Elg3 40.Wxe2 dxe2 4 1 .Ele4.
17J'he7!
A neat tactic to take control of the c5-square.
17 .. J�xe7
If 1 7 . . . Wfxe7? , evidently 1 8 .i.xa6.
18.ltlc5 Wfb6 19.EiJxa6
White has obtained two pieces for a rook.
39 ... gg3! 40.e6 gxh3t 41 .�xh3 Wfxfl
42.�g4 Wfe2t 43.�f5 h3 44.e7 h2 0-1
19 ... c5 20.a4 �ae8
7-20 G. Flear - I. Nataf
Or 20 . . . c4 2 1 .�xc4 dxc4 22.WI'xa8t Ele8
23 .WI'f3 and White emerges with an extra
pawn.
2 Lib5 �e1 t 22J��xe1 gxe1 t 23.<.t>h2 ltle4
24.tlJc7 c4 25.EiJxd5 Wfd4 26.tlJe7t �h7
27.ltlf5 Wfa1 28.ltlg3 f5 29.Lc4 ltlxg3
30.�xg3 g5 3 1 .Wfb7t 1-0
7- 1 8 J. Parker - G. Flear
Guernsey 1 989
French League 2008
13.i.xb5??
I chose the blunder!
Critical is 1 3.4Jxb5 ! , when the reply 1 3 . . . 4J d7
gives practical compensation for Black, j ust as
in a Benko Gambit.
The other try 1 3 .0-0!? b4 1 4. 4J d l ltJ d7
yields chances for both sides.
13 ...hc3! 14.bxc3
47 ... d3?
Definitely the worse choice!
The alternatives 47 . . . Elh4t 48.<;f?gl d3 and
47 . . . '1Wf6! should both win soon enough.
48.Wfh3!
The threat of mate saves the game.
48 ... �£6 49.Wffl t �g5 so.gast f5 5 I .Wfxd3
gh4t 52.�g2 Wfc6t 53.gd5 c2 54.Wfe3t
�f6 55.Wfe5t �f7 56.ltlxf5! gxf5 57.Wfxf5t
�e7 58.Wfe5t �f7 59.Wff5t �e7 60.Wfe5t
�f7 %-Vz
•
If 1 4.'1Wxc3 , then again 1 4 . . . WI'xb 5 .
14 ...Wfxb5! 15.axb5 �xal t 1 6.�e2 gxh1
Black has too much wood for the queen.
17.h3 ga1 1 8.c4 tLld7 19.Wfb2 �a4 20.ltld2
ib7
White is helpless against the threat to double
on the a-file followed by penetrating with the
rooks.
0-1
Blunder-bashing
7-2 1
7-23
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
One should choose between 1 3 .ltJ xc 5 ,
1 3 .bxc5 and 13 0-0. Which is best?
7-22
0
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
The choice is between 27.:B:b7,
27.:B:xg7t, 27.Wfd3 and 27.Wfb7.
7-24
a
b
c
d
e
f
White has four interesting options:
24.l''k 8 , 24J'W , 24.<j;J d l and 24.Wfd5.
You should select one that
leads to an advantage.
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Which of 33.:B:xc3, 33.:B:b7 or 33.:B:b8 t ,
would you go for?
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
7-2 1 G. Flear - S. Milliet
25.i.f5 '!We3t 26.'�fl 'IWOt 27.i>e1 '!W:xh1 t
Lattes 2009
Although the position remains complicated,
Black has a big material advantage which
enabled him to win the game.
1 3.bxc5??
What an oversight!
As alternatives go, I don't like the resulting
position after 1 3 .0-0? cxb4, as Black is solid
enough, and I don't really believe that White
has any compensation.
In fact, I should have chosen 1 3 . li'l xc5!,
for example 13 ... lt'l xc5 1 4. bxc5 �xc5 (if
14 ... �xf3 ! ? 1 5 .�xf3 e4 1 6.�g2 �xc5 1 7.:B:b l
I prefer White who can put pressure on the
centre) 1 5 .:B:b l V!ia6 1 6.0-0 e4 1 7.li'le5 with
a complex position, which shouldn't be worse
for White.
13 .tc6!
..•
Whoops! The knight on a4 has no squares!
14.ttlh4 e4 15.'1Wb3 '!Wxa4 16.'!We6t i>ds
17.0-0 idS 18.'!Wh3
With complications, where White is a piece
light!
7-23 G. Flear - 0. Jackson
Liverpool 2008
The queen moves are the strongest options.
22.'!Wb7!?
I managed to avoid the plausible 22.:B:b7??
which loses to a cunning trap: 22 ... :B:xc4!
23.:B:xb5 ixf2t! 24.:B:xf2 (or 24.\t>h l :B:xe4-+)
24 . . . :B:cl t 2 5 .:B:fl :B:cxfl #.
Possible is 22.Vfid3, for example 22 . . . ixf2t
23.:B:xf2 :B:xf2 24.'it>xf2 :B:xc4 2 5 .:B:d8t �f7 and
White has an extra pawn.
Finally, 22.:B:xg7t?! <;t>xg7 23.li'lxe3 \Wxb2
might be playable, but this is not so clear.
22 '!Wxb7 23.:B:xb7 ixflt 24.:B:xf2 :B:xc4
25.:B:xf8t i>x£8
..•
With decent winning chances after either
26.:B:xa7 or 26.h3.
7-22 T. Pasquier - G. Flear
7-24 G. Flear - S. Buscara
French League 20 1 0
Lattes 2005
24.:B:c8??
The worst of the four alternatives!
Instead 24.:B:fl ! wins, as after 24 . . . ig 1
2 5 . :B:xf8t :B:xf8 26.� d 1 We3 27.Vfif5 ! , it's
White's attack that does the business.
Similar is 24. �d 1 ! :B:ad8 2 5 .:B:fl . Then Black's
desperate efforts to obtain dark-squared play,
before the d-pawn lands, fall short: 2 5 . . . �g7
26.:B:c8 Wh5t 27.�c2 d3t 28.<;hd3! :B:xfl
29 .ixfl Wd l t 30.�xe3 Wd4t 3 1 .<;f;>f3 and
White has an extra piece.
On the other hand, 24.Vfid 5 ? is too slow:
24 . . . if2t! 2 5 . <;f;>d 1 Vfih5t 26.:B:e2 ie3
27.ie6 Wg6! 28 .Wxe5t :B:f6 and the threat
to invade with the queen gives Black enough
counterplay.
24...i.cl !
Th e only way to refute White's previous
move .
•
I played the only one of the three that doesn't
win!
33J:�b8t??
One way to victory is 33.:B:xc3! Vfifl t (no
better is 33 . . .Wxc3 34.ih6 \Wc8 3 5 .Vfif6 etc.)
34.'it>g3 Wg l t 3 5 .<;t>h3 g5 36.:B:c8t <;t>g?
37. '?!1xg5 t .
Another method involves 33.:B:b7! e 5
(33 . . . Vfifl t 34.'it>g3 Wg i t 3 5 .<i>h3 Wfl t
36.<;t>h4 Vfic4t 37.f4 e5 38 .<;f;>g5!) 34.:B:c7 etc.
33 i>g7 34.\WfSt?
.•.
Necessary at this point is 34.:B:b7 Vfifl t
3 5 .<;f;>g3 Wg l t 36.<;f;>h3 Wfl t 37.�g3 = .
34 . . <it>f6
.
Black's attack is now the more dangerous
(see Exercise 4-72) !
Blunder-bashing
7-25
7-27
•
8
7
6
5
4
.,=,/mm'•uuu/•'m
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
How should White continue?
7-26
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Black should choose between
32 . . . <j;lf7, 32 . . . 1"k6 and 32 . . . �b3 .
7-28
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How to exploit the space advantage?
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Black has four options to choose from:
27 . . . lt:lc8, 27 . . . Wff c 7, 27 . . . 1"1:hd8 and
27 . . . 1"1:ad8 . Which one would
you vote for?
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
7-25 G. Flear - N. Borne
7-28 C. D'Amore - G. Flear
French League 2006
Nice 1 997
27...'!1Nc7??
34.'it>xc4!
Otherwise Black would be better.
34 ... b2 35.i>b3 b l ='!1Nt
My opponent saw too late that the intended
35 .. .1'!xc3t fails to 36.�xb2.
36.lthb 1 �xb 1 t 37.i>c2 �h1 38.h4 'it>e6
39.e4 g6 40.�c5 �h2
Following 40 . . . �d6, White would continue
with 4 1 . �d2 h5 42.2"la5 �b 1 43.�a7 etc.
4l.�xc6t i>f7 42.�c7t 'it>e6 43.i>d3 �xfl.
44.i>e3 �g2 45.i>f3 �d2 46.d5t 'it>e5
47.'it>e3 �g2 48.�e7t 'it>d6 49.�e6t 1-0
7-26 G. Flear - D. Gelis
Montpellier 2005
1 8.g4 J.g6 19.g5 J.xg5 20.J.xg5 '!1Nxg5
2 l .J.xd7 1-0
White nets a piece.
Not good!
Of the alternatives 27 . . . 2"lad8? fails to the
bombshell 28 .2"le6!!, e.g. 28 . . . CLl e8 (or 28 . . . CLl f5
29.2"lxf6t! �xf6 30.2"lxf5 t gxf5 3 1 .�xb7 etc.)
29.2"lxd8 �xf3t 30.'it>xf3 'it>xe6 3 1 .2"lb8 and
the endgame looks too difficult for Black.
Possible however is 27 . . . 2"lhd8 ! 28 .�e6! CLl e8!
29 .2"lc6 (if 29 .2"lxd8 �xf3t 30.�xf3 Elxd8
3 1 .2"lxb6 �xd3t 32.'it>e4 Eld7 33.c5, I think a
draw is the most likely result) 29 . . . 'it>g7 with
chances for both sides.
Otherwise, 27 . . . CLl c8 isn't very elegant, but
holds things together, for example 28 .2"le6!?
'it>xe6 29.2"le5t fxe5 30.�xb7 Ela7 (White
nevertheless retains some initiative, and Black
must defend carefully) 3 1 .�c6t �f7 32.�d5t
�f6 33 .d4!? Ele7!.
28.�xd6!
Wins!
7-27 G. Flear - Y. Berthelot
French League 1 999
28 ...'!1Nxd6 29.'!1Nb7t 'it>g8 30.'!1Nxa8t 'it> g7
3 1 .'!1Nb7t 'it>h6 32.�e7
Black's position is hopeless.
32 ... i>f7?
Centralizing the king immediately turns out
to be an error. My opponent should in fact
have activated his other pieces first.
After 32 . . . �b3! , unlike in the game,
the exchange of rooks with 33.2"ld6 is not
advantageous, as Black has 33 . . . �c6 34.2"lxc6
bxc6 3 5 . CLl d6 �xa4 36.CLl b7 �b3 37.CLlxa5
�d5 38 .g3 c5.
The other possibility 32 . . . 2"lc6! 33 .2"ld6 �b3
comes to the same thing.
33.�d6! �xd6
If 33 . . . 2"lc6, White is better: 34.�xc6 bxc6
3 5 . CLl d6t �e7 (or 35 . . . � f6 36.CLl b7 �b3
37.CLlxa5 �xa4 3 8 .�d4 �e7 39.�c5 �d7
40 . CLl c4) 36.CLlb7 �b3 37.CLlxa5 �xa4 3 8 .�d4
�d6 3 9. CLl c4t �c7 40.�c5!.
34.llhd6t 'it>e7 35.lZ'lxb7 J.b3 36.llha5
J.xa4 37.'it>d4 'it>f6 38.g3 ib5 39.b4 g5
40.'it>e3 i.fl 4l.lZ'lc6 1-0
•
Blunder-bashing
7-29
7-30
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What is the logical result after the move
played in the game 28 ti'xf3?
...
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How many of the following four moves
are playable for White: 24.�c2, 24.�d3 ,
24.�xc6 and 24.d5?
•
Glenn Flear
7-29 J. Campos Moreno - G. Flear
7-30 M. Lyell - G. Flear
Metz 1 983
Plymouth 1 989
The sacrifice doesn't work and leads to a decisive
advantage to White. The game continued
with . . .
The game ended abruptly 24.�xc6?? l:!e2t
0- 1 .
Otherwise if 24.�d3 ? , Black has a pretty win
with 24 . . . l:!e2t! 2 5 .�xe2 l:!g6t 26.<;tJh l l:!h6
when mate is forced .
Finally, 24.d5? l:!e2t! 25 .�xe2 1MI'xa4 26.dxc6
Wxc6 doesn't give White enough for the
queen.
The only good move is . . .
2 8. . .Wfxf3? 29.gxf3 �gSt 30.�hl i.hS
. . . when my opponent reacted correctly. . .
3 1 .h4!
. . . giving some wriggle room for his king.
3 1 ...ixf3t 32.�h2 �g2t 33.�h3 gS 34.hxg5
�xgS 35.e4!
Another precise move, that leaves Black short
of time for his mating ambitions.
3S ... �fg8 36.Wfxg5! �xgS 37.�gl
Black is left with a miserable endgame.
37 ... �h5t 38.�g3 ixe4 39.�cel ig6 40.f4
�f5 41 .�e7 �f7 42.�xf7 Lf7 43.�h4 h6
44.f5 1-0
The king is cut off.
•
Tactimania
24.Wfc2!
. .. which covers the important second rank.
Then after
24 .. J�h6 25.�hl
... the outcome would be uncertain.
Most of the exercises in p uzzle books, and this one is no exception , test the ability of the reader to
find 'positive' continuations, generally starting fro m a position of strength.
Naturally, in our own games, we may find ourselves frequently on the defensive, so it follows that
testing resourcefulness under pressure has practical value.
So the first priority in the following exercises then is to avoid defeat, perhaps with a forced draw
or an equalizing continuation . At times, the best one can do is j ust minimize any disadvantage,
but at others a cunning rejoinder can even turn the tables.
The ability to calculate robust defensive moves, or similarly prepare a counter-blow, in order to
save the day, is an underestimated aspect of a chess player's skill. Improving your feeling in this
area should help you salvage many a half-point, or more!
Continue to seek any potential faults in the other camp, even if the opposing forces seem to be
better placed than yours. O nce you have determined the whereabouts of the Achilles' heel, then
aim for this target!
Here are some examples to get you going.
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
M. Todorcevic - G. Flear
Clermont-Ferrand 1 986
In an inferior position, my opponent found a
way to save the game.
24.l2:lf6t! gxf6 25.'1Wxf6 WI'aS 26J3xe3! dxe3
27..id5
Black cannot avoid the threatened perpetual
check.
27 ... ie6 28.Wfg5t @hs 29.Wff6t @gs
30.Wfg5t lf2-lf2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
G. Flear - R. Britton
Southport 1 983
8
Here, you would have needed to find the
unique path to salvation.
7
6
39 ...Wfel !
5
Otherwise, the plausible 39 . . . lt:lh3t?
40.ixh3 1Mfe l t doesn't in fact work, because
of 4 l .'i:t>g2! when the king can wriggle out
of the perpetual: 4 l . . .'.Wg3t 42.'i:t>fl 1Mfxf3t
43.if2 1Mfxh3t 44.'i:t>e2 1Mfc3 45 .\Wf5 ! and
White's attack is winning .
4
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
40.g5t @g6 4I .if2 ttle2t [email protected] llJ f4t
[email protected] ttl e2t
Drawing .
•
Decisive Defence
G. Flear F. Marcille
-
Narbonne-plage 2008
8
At this point, my opponent could have
combined attack with defence . . .
7
2 1 ...ttle8!
6
In the game, 2 l . . .g5? was insufficient, i.e.
22.Ei:b l gxh4 23.gxh4 lt:l g4 24.�xg4 hxg4
2 5 . Ei:xb7 �xh4 26.�xc5 and White won
quite quickly.
5
4
3
22J:&bl ttld6!
2
The knight protects b7, and, by attacking
the c4-pawn gains a tempo.
•
23.<i>d3 f5!
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
The counter-attack gets underway!
24.hc5
(diagram)
24 ... b5!
8
Also possible, but perhaps less convincing
is 24 . . . fxe4t, for example 2 5 . lt:l xe4 lt:l xe4
26.�xe7 (26.�xe4? �xc5) 26 . . . �f5 ! (otherwise
26 . . . lt:lxf2t 27.'it>c3 '!Nf5 28.Ei:xb7 probably
favours White, but this isn't that clear either)
27.�xf8 li:l d6t 28.'it>e2 Wxc4t 29.\t> e l lt:l xf8
with dangerous counterplay.
7
6
5
4
3
2
•
2S .ixd6
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Rather than 2 5 . cxb 5 ? fxe4t 26.lt:lxe4 lLlxe4
27.�xe7?! Wi'c3t as Black mates!
2S ... Wfxc4t 26.<i>d2 ixd6 27 .ie2 WfcS
•
With chances for both sides.
So in this example, in order to counter White's
queenside play, Black aims to exploit a potential
weakness in his opponent's set-up. Here it's the
fragile position of the king that enables Black to
fight back.
•
Exercises
•
8-4
8-1
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
8-5
8-2
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
8-3
8
7
6
5
4
3
0
•
Glenn Flear
8- 1 U. Hobuss - G. Flear
Dortmund 1 98 5
37.h3??
A blunder.
Instead 37.1Mfe2! was necessary, defending
both the e4- and e l -squares whilst winning a
tempo!
Tactimania
h2! 5 1 .\t;xe2 h l ='IW 52.\t;f2 f5 53.id3 \Wh4t
54.\t;e3 \Wel t 55.ie2 'lWei t 56.\t;d3 \Wh it
57.\t;e3 '�Wel t 58.\t;d3 g5 59.ic3 \t;f7
60.id2 '11ffa3t 61 .ic3 \t;e6 62.\t>d2 1Mfa4
63. \t;e 1 g4 64.fxg4 fxg4 65.id2 1Mfd4 66.ifl
g3 67.ih3t \t>e5 68.\t;e2 1Mff2t 0-1
8-4 G. Flear - P. Capitanio
37 ..J��xe4 38.c!Dxe4 !he1 t 39.\t;h2 �xe4
0-1
Narbonne-plage 2006
4 1 . .. lL!d4?
8-2 G. Flear - M. Sharif
French League 1 987
26 ...'11ffc6?
The only move was 26 ... �f8 ! , when White's
best would be to take the draw with 27.Wfxg6t
�h8 28 .Wfh6t etc.
27.c!Dd6 \t;h? 28.'1Wf7t \t;h6 29.c!Dxe8 dxc4
30.�£3 1-0
8-3 G. Flear - R. Willmoth
Uppingham 1 987
3 1 .'1Wf2?
42.liJ b6 c!lJb5 43.c!Dxa8 c!Dxa3 44.c!lJb6 1-0
8-5 G. Flear - S. Conquest
I should have played 3 1 . lt:l f5 ! , for example
3 l . . .gxf5 (also leading to a draw is 3 l . . .Wfd 1 t
32.i.g 1 gxf5 33.1Mfg5t 'tfif8 34.Wfh6t 'tfie7
3 5 .1Mfg5t 'tfid7 36.1Mfxf5 t 'tfic7 37.Wfc5t
<j;>b8 38 .1Mfa7t \t>c7 39.1Mfc5t) 32.1Mfg5t �f8
33 .Wfh6t 'tfig8 (but not 33 . . . 'tfie7?? 34.i.g5 t)
34.Wfg5t with perpetual check.
There was a better way to give up the
queen . . . 2 l . . .�xe7! 22.i.xe6 �xc7 23 .id5
i.xd5 24.Wfxd5 �d8 , when Black will pick off
the d-pawn and obtain full compensation.
3 1 ...'1Wg4
22.ixf7t!
Even stronger was 3 l . . .ixg2t! 32. �xg2
1Mfb7t.
Compared to the line in the previous note,
White gains an additional pawn, plus the
initiative.
32.c!Df3 hf3 33.gxf3 '11ffe6 34.i.d2 '11ffe2
35.\t;g2 '11fxf2
f t 36.\t>x£2 �b8
The endgame was clearly better for Black.
The final moves being . . .
37.ie4 �b2 38.\t;e3 �xa2 39.h4 a5 40.ic3
�h2 41 .if6 a4 42. \t;d4 a3 43.\t;xc4 a2
44.\t;b3 h5 45.ib2 �xh4 46.\t;xa2 �h2
47.\t;b3 h4 48.ie5 �e2 49.\t>c3 h3 50.\t>d3
•
A fatal error.
The correct move was 4 l . . .c3! , as the
following variations demonstrate: 42. \t> e i
(42 .\t>e2 lt:l d4t! 43.'tfid3 c 2 44.�c3 lt:l b 5
4 5 . �xc2 lt:lxa7=) 42 . . . lt:l d4 (only now!)
43.�xc3 (43 . lt:l b6 lt:l c2t - as this comes with
check, Black has an extra tempo than in the
actual game - 44.'tfid 1 lt:lxa3 4 5 . lt:l xa8 lt:l b5=)
43 ... lt:l b 5 44.�c5 lt:l xa7 4 5 . lt:l d6 �d8 46.lt:lxf7
'tfixf7 47.�c7t 'tfif6 48.�xa7 h5 with a drawn
endgame.
Edinburgh 1 98 5
2 1 . . .1Mfxe7?
22 ... \t>h7 23.�xe7 �xe7 24.�e1 �£8 25.�xe4!
�exf7
Or 2 5 . . . �xe4 26.Wc2 �xf7 27.1Mfxe4, and
White should win.
26.lLle5 c!Dxe5 27.dxe5 �xf2 28.e6! �fl t
29.\t>g2 �8f2t 30.\t;g3 �d2 3 1 .e7 �gl t
32.\t>£3 h5 33.g5 �xg5 34.e8='1W 1-0
Decisive Defence
8-6
8-9
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
8-7
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
8-8
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
8-6 J. Gallagher - G. Flear
8-8 G. Flear - A. Kinsman
Clermont-Ferrand 1 986
Nottingham 1 987
23 ... lt.Jflt! 24.<i>gl
28 ...VNe4!
Not 24.:!:%xf2?? because of 24 . . . :!:%d 1 t .
24 .. J3dt t 2s.<i>xfl �us
Black uses the pin to rescue himself from the
jaws of defeat.
29.�xf7t <i>h6 30.�gl �xg2! 3 1 .�xg2 �el t
32.�gl �e4t 1/z-Vz
A pretty resource!
8-9 L. Christiansen - G. Flear
26J�xf8t <i>:x£8 27.lt.Jxh7t
Or if 27.<Jif3 :!:%fl t 28.<Jie4 :!:%f2, Black has
j ust about enough play to hold.
Szirak 1 987
27 ... <i>g8 28.lt.Jg5 �d5 29.lt.JO �xc5 30.a3
The game finished with 24 . . . g5?? 2 5 . tfJ f6 1 -0.
In fact, if Black finds a series of only moves
he can save himself, starting with . . .
Vz-1/z
8-7 G. Flear - N. Short
London 1 986
36.�e7?
The move played in the game turns out to
be flawed.
The idea is correct, but requires an alternative
move order, that is 36.:!:%f3! �xe4 (36 . . . :!:%xe2
37.�e7 also heads towards a draw) 37.�e7
ttJ g4 3 8 .�xf7t <Jih6 39.�e7 �xe2 (39 . . . tfJ e3t
40.<Jih2 ttJ g4t 4 1 .<j;lg2) 40.�g5t and Black
cannot escape from the checks.
36 ... lt.Jg4?
In my opinion, Black could play for
more with 36 . . . ttJ xe4! . For example 37.h5
(otherwise 37.:gf3 ? �xd5 38 .id3 loses to
38 . . . :gxf2t! 39.:gxf2 ttJ xf2t 40.<j;lxf2 �xd3)
37 . . . :gxe2! (37 . . . �xd5 3 8 .h6t <Jixh6 39 .�h4t
<Jig? 40.�xe4 �xe4t 4 1 .:gxe4 f5 may also be
dangerous for White) 38.:gxe2 tt'l c3 with a
certain advantage for the second player.
After 36 . . . tt'l g4? a draw was agreed (Y2-Y2)
because of the variation . . .
37.�0! VNxe4 38.VN:xf7t <i>h6 39.VNe7
. . . as already seen above .
•
24 .. ."�xd4! 25.g3
Direct combinations don't work due to the
weakness of White's first rank, e.g. 2 5 . tfJ f6??
�d l # or 2 5 Jhh7t?? <j;lxh7 26.ttJ f6t i.xf6
27.�xd4 :gd8.
25 VNdt t! 26.<i>g2 VNd3! 27.�e3
.•.
Black survives following 27.�h6?? �xe4t
28.<j;lg1 g5.
27... <i>g8!
Better than 27 . . . g5 28.tt'lxg5 ixg5 29 .�xg5
�e4t 30.f3 �c2t 3 1 .if2 �g6, as White's
initiative would then be persistent after
32 .�e7.
28.�c5
If 2 8 . ttJ f6t ixf6 29.exf6, Black would have
29 . . . �d5t 30.f3 g5!.
28 ... t!Jc7! 29.he7 lt.Jd5 30.�h6
Or 30 .�h4 h5 3 1 .ixf8 <j;lxf8 , and the passed
c-pawn allows Black to resist.
30 VNxe4t 3 1 .<i>gl �b i t
..•
With perpetual check.
Decisive Defence
8-1 3
8- 1 0
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
8-1 4
8- 1 1
•
•
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
8-1 2
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
8- 10 K. Langeweg - G. Flear
8- 1 2 G. Flear - A. Haik
Ramsgate 1 982
Metz 1 984
32 .. J�c8!
23.tLle2!
A superb defensive move, but unfortunately
I didn't find it at the time.
I actually lost quickly following 32 .. .'�xd 5 ?
3 3 . lt:l c7 � e 5 34.lt:lxe8 �xe8 3 5 .�xh6 �e2
36J'hf6t! 1 -0, because of 36 . . . Wxf6 37.�f8t
�e6 3 8 .�e8t .
Otherwise, if32 . . . l:!e7?! 33.�f4 �f5 34.�c4
�e5 3 5 .�c6, White maintains the pressure.
A neat defensive move that I didn't find
during the game. I played 23.Wh l ?, bur
following 23 . . . lt:l g6 24.�xb7 �h3 25 .l:!g 1 l:!e8
the attack was decisive.
33.�f4
24.�xe7
Or 3 3 . lt:l c7 �g8! 34.1:!xf6 l:!xc7!=.
23 ... fxe2
If 23 . . . '\Wh3 ? , White has 24. lt:l f4. Another
try, 23 . . . lt:l g6 met by 24. lt:l d4! l:!g8 (24 . . . �h3
2 5 . lt:lxf3) 2 5 .�xf5 , leaves White on top.
White is better.
33 ...�f5
When the chances would be balanced.
8- 1 1 J. Bernard - G. Flear
Montpellier 2002
2 1 ...l:!dd7!
A precise move that holds the position
together.
It's too slow to move the king . . . 2 1 . . .Wf8 ?
22.ixf7 Wxf7 23.l:!e3 . . . a s the p i n along the
d-file will prove fatal for Black.
22.l:!e8t?
This move should have been avoided.
Instead with either 22.Wfl j.xg2t 23.Wxg2
lt:l f4t 24.Wf3 lt:l xe2t 2 5 .ixf7t l:!xf7t 26.Wxe2,
or 22.ixf7t Wxf7 23.f3 lt:l f4, chances would
be balanced.
22 ... �h7 23.ixf7 l:!xf7
Everything is hunky-dory, noting that now
the bishop on c6 attacks the rook on e8.
24.l:!e6 tLlxb2! 25.l:!d8
If 2 5 .1:!b 1 , Black has 2 5 . . . id5 26.1:!e5 lt:l a4!.
25 ...ib7 26Jlb8 l:'!d7 27.8 ttl a4
Another fork to frustrate White (28.l:!xb7
lt:l c5 ) !
28.�f2 J.d5 29.l:!xa6 ixa2 30.l:!a7 tLlxc3
3 1 .l:!bb7 id5 32.l:!xc7 l:!xc7 33Jhc7 b4
34.i>e3 b3! 35.i>d2 b2 36.ci>c2 b l =�t 0-1
•
8- 13 C. Flear - S. Coriat
Cannes 2000
29 ...hg2!
The bishop is sacrificed in order to avoid the
threatened 30.�xd4t, but also to gain time to
move the under-attack rook on b8.
In the game, 29 ... d3? lost quickly: 30.�d4t
Wg8 3 1 .lt:lxb8 l:!xb8 32.ie6t Wf8 33.f3 '1We5
34.fxe4t We7 3 5 .�a7t �xe6 36.'\Wf7#.
30.ixg2 l:!xb2 3 1 . tLl b6 gel!
Rather than 3 1 . . . �h4? 32.�f7.
32.�c8t i>g7 33.�d7t i>h6 34.�h3t i>g5
Black has the superior prospects.
8- 14 C. Flear - S. Volkov
St Vincent 2003
36.ixg2!
The tempting move 36.ixe7? was refuted in
the game by 36 . . . 1:!h2! (rather than 36 ... l:!g3 ?
37.ih5 l:!xe3 38 . .ie8 +-) 37.a4 h5 38 .axb5
axb5 39.Wcl h4 40.Wd 1 l:!f2 4 1 ..ixh4 l:!xf3
42.We2 :!:!h3 43 .ie 1 Wg7 44.�d3 Wg6 45 .id2
wh5 46.Wc3 :!:!h2 47.�d3 �g4 48 .ie 1 � f3
49 .id2 l:!h 1 50.ic3 l:!d I t 5 1 . Wc2 We2 0- 1 .
36 ...hb4 37.ci>c2
The opposite-coloured bishop endgame
seems to be drawn. If, for example, one places
White's king on f3, then the bishop can
temporize between g2 and f1 , and then Black
cannot make any progress .
Decisive Defence
8-1 s
8-1 8
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
8- 1 9
8- 1 6
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
8-20
8-1 7
8
8
7
7
6
5
4
0
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
8- 1 5 N. Sulava - G. Flear
8- 1 8 T. Wessendorf - G. Flear
St Vincent 2002
Lugano 1 988
37.'i?g2!
47 ... ti:)xg3!
The game ended as follows: 37.Wh l ? Wib2!
3 8 . iLl t7t Wg7 39.Wfxf3 Wfxc l t 40.Wg2 :B;xc8
0- 1 .
Otherwise, 37.Wf2?! is not so bad, but is
not that great either, e.g. 37 . . . :B;xc8 38 .Wff7
(38J'hc7 faces an attack following 3 8 . . . tLl e 5 t
39.Wg2 :B;f8 ; and 3 8 .Wfxf3 ? is well m e t by
38 . . . Wfb2t) 38 . . . Wfxf7 39.tLlxf7t Wg8 40.iLld6
tLle5! with some advantage to Black.
White's king cannot escape from a 'perpetual
net' .
48.Wfxd6
48.Wxg3 ? is disastrous, as with 48 . . . Wfe5t
Black soon mates.
48 ... tl:)fl t 49.c;t?g1 .!Dg3t so.c;t?h2 �g8
S l .�el! Wfxe1 52.'1Wf6t 1/z-1/z
Finally, it was White who gave the perpetual
check.
37 ... :B;e2t [email protected] ti:)d4t 39.�f5! @g7
40.:B;d1 @xh6 41 .'1Wxd4 �e5
8- 19 S. Conquest - G. Flear
Blackpool 1 988
White now has a forced draw.
42.'1Wd2t @g7 43.'1Wd7t @h6 44.'1Wd2t
28.Wfh6!
8- 16 G. Flear - A. Barsov
Hastings 2002/3
Otherwise, 28.:B;xg6t hxg6 29 ."W'h6 :B;xd4
30.Wfxg6t comes to the same thing.
28 Jhd4 29.�xg6t! hxg6 30.Wfxg6t @h8
3 1 .'1Wh6t c;t?g8 32.�gl !?
•.
37 ...�h3t!
An unpleasant surprise for me!
38.c;i{xh3
A last winning attempt.
32 .id6 33.c;t?h3t .ig3 34.'1Wg6t @h8
35.Wfh6t 1/z-1/z
..•
38.Wf2 is possible, but by continuing with
38 . . . Wfc l Black prepares to deliver multiple
checks anyway.
8-20 J.L. Chabanon - G. Flear
French League 2007
38 ...'1Wh5t [email protected] W/xf7 40.�d5 'IWhS
4l ..ixg8 Wfe2t 42.c;i{h3 'IWhSt [email protected] '1We2t
30 ... �xf3!
•!z-•!z
8- 17 I. Boleski - G. Flear
Geneva 1 98 5
A combination that solves all Black's
problems. The alternatives leave White with a
small but durable advantage.
3 l .�g2
My opponent found a drawing combination.
29.'1We5t! c;i{d7 30.�xf7t! Lf7 3 1 .'1We7t
c;t?c8 32.Wff8t @b7 33.Wfb4t @c8 34.Wff8t
%-%
The capture 3 l .exf3 ? is dubious because
of 3 1 . . . iLl xf3t 32.We3 lLl xg 5 , even if White
would then retain drawing chances with
3 3 . lLl f4 �e8 34.�d3 .
Alternatively, 3 1 .iLlxe5 :B;xfl 32.tLlc4t Wc7
33.1'!xg6 !!d I t 34. We3 �c6 is equal.
3 1 ..J�if5 32.ti:)xe5 @xeS
32 . . . 1'!xg5 ?? 33.iLJf7t.
33.�xg6 �f6 34.�xf6 c;i(xf6 %-%
•
Decisive Defence
•
8-2 1
8-23
8
8
7
7
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
c
d
e
f
g
h
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
8-24
8-22
b
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
8-2 1 G. Flear - J. Henneteau
8-23 J.P. Boudre - G. Flear
French League 2009
St Affrique 2005
2 1 ...�f6!
My opponent resigned but instead . . .
A counter that proves to be strong.
56. . J�e8!
. . . holds!
57J�xe8 '1Wd3t 58. � cl '1Wc3t 59. � d1 \Wai t
60. � c2 '1Wc3t=
8-22 J. Baron Rodriguez - G. Flear
22.<!be2 gxf5 23.exf5 tlJg5 24.hg5 �xg5
25.'1Wd3
Here, 25 .�c3 1imits the damage, but 25 . . . c5
gives Black all the trumps.
25 ... c5 26.tlJc3? �e3t! 27.tlJxe3 :gxe3 0-1
Spanish League 2005
8-24 M. Prathemesh - G. Flear
Montpellier 2008
39 ... tlJc3!
In the game, after 39 . . . :1l:b2? 40.:1'l:c l tt:'lxe7,
White missed an easy win with 4 l .�c5 ! .
40-l:l:eS tlJd1
Th e knight attacks f2 and prevents the rook
on fl from becoming dangerous.
41.:EU3
Th e alternative, 4 1 .:1l:c5? :1l:xf2 42.:1l:xd l
:1l:xg2t 43.�h l :1l:h2t 44.\t>gl :1l:xc 5 , favours
Black.
4I ...llJ:xn 42J::�e1
44.:gd5!
:ge2 43.:gxe2
:gxe2
As the knight cannot escape, White draws,
for example:
44... :gb2 45.b5 �xe7 46.b6 � e6 47.:gd4
� f6 48.b7 :gxb7 49. �xn
•
14 ... lbxe4!
Black has to react quickly before White's
attack becomes decisive.
1 5.dxe4 \Wxe4 16.\WgSt � h7 17.\WhSt
� g7!
An important move as Black now threatens
1 8 . . . :1l:h8.
On the other hand, 17 ... �g8? is too slow,
as after the calm 1 8 . tt:'l d2 I doubt that the
position would be defensible.
18.'1Wg5t
Or if 1 8 .Wh l ? :1l:h8 1 9 .Wg5t Wf8 , Black
would be able to play for a win; whereas the
other try 1 8 . f6t Wg8 1 9 .tt:'ld2, can be met by
1 9 . . . '1Wh7.
18 ... � h7 19.\WhSt � g7 20.\WgSt 112-112
Decisive Defence
8-27
8-25
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
8-28
8-26
•
•
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
8-25 G. Flear - J. Kuende Gorostidi
8-27 D. Pira - G. Flear
San Sebastian 2006
French League 1 998
25 ... li)f3t!
23 ... 'i!ld8!
An elegant defence.
The game instead concluded in White's
favour with 25 .. .'1Wg6? 26.f4 tt:l g4 27.2"k 1
e5 28 .Wfxd5 exf4 29.2"k 6 fxe3 30.l'!xd6 Wfc2
3 l .l'!xf7 Wfd 1 t 32.l'!fl t 1 -0.
The king has to run for the hills!
The game ended one-sidedly: 23 . . . l:'!f8 ?
24.li::l x e6! mxe6 2 5 .Wfxf8 Wfxa2 26.Wfh6t 'kt>e7
27.e6 1 -0.
26.gxf3 �h3! 27.f4 �g4t
And draws by perpetual check!
24.gcl i.c6! 25.li)xf7t
Not 25 .l:'!xc6?? due to 2 5 . . . Wfxe 1 #.
25 ... 'iflc7
The result remains in doubt.
8-26 D. Dumitrache - G. Flear
Guingamp 2008
8-28 G. Flear - E. Gallo
Lugano 1 986
39 ...�xc4!
Another playable possibility is 39 . . . li::l d7!,
for example 40 . .ixe6 fxe6 4 l .li::l g5 e5 42.Wfd 1
when White would have enough compensa­
tion for the pawn.
In the game, I blundered with 39 . . . l'!xc4??
and after 40.li::l f6t mh8 4 l .li::l d 5 t I had lost
my queen! Even if I then resisted for 30 more
moves, the damage had already been done . . .
4 l . . .mg8 42.tt:l xb4 l:'!xb4 43.Wff6 l:'!xa4 44.l:'!d 1
l:'!c4 4 5 .l:'!d8 l:'!c8 46.l:'!xc8 .ixc8 47.�d8 �d7
48 .Wfxa5 h5 49 .�d8 mg7 50.f3 �c6 5 l .h4
li::l e6 5 2.Wfe7 tt:l f8 53.mf2 li::l e6 54.'tt> e 3 mg8
5 5 .g4 hxg4 56.fxg4 mg7 57.mf2 �h 1 5 8 .mg3
�c6 59 .Wfb4 'kt>g8 60.Wfc3 ih 1 6 l .Wfe5 ic6
62.Wff6 �h 1 63.Wfe5 �c6 64. h 5 gxh5 6 5 . gxh5
mh7 66.mg4 �d7 67.mf5 ! li::l g7t 68.'kt>g5 �e6
69 .Wfe4t li::l f5 70.Wfxb7 tt:l h6 7 l .�b8 mg7
72 .Wfd8 1 -0.
40.li)f6t 'i!lh8 4l.li)e8t f6 42.li)xc7 �xc7
43.�xf6t 'i!lg8 44.gxe6 li)xe6 45.�xe6t
'ill g7 46.g3
With equal chances .
•
43 ... gxc7!
Black didn't resist very well in the game, i.e.
43 . . . li::l f5 ? 44.�xf5 gxf5 45 .�a3 Wfa4 46.d6
b4 47.Wfd 1 Wfd7 48 .Wfxd4 bxa3 49.l:'!xa3 Wb5
50 .l:'!a2 l:'!e8 5 l .l:'!g2 1 -0.
44.i.a3 �xa3! 45.gxa3 c2
White has no advantage!
46.�d2 i.h2 47.ga6 cl =� 48.�xcl ixcl
49.gxd6
A draw is on the cards.
Decisive Defence
8-3 1
8-29
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
8-32
8-30
•
•
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
S-29 J. Ady - G. Flear
S-3 1 J. Prats Rodriguez - G. Flear
Lambeth 1 98 5
Port Barcares 20 1 0
Black has a spectacular defence.
I found a way to resist in a difficult position.
26 �g6!
2 I ...id3!
The game continuation wasn't much fun
from my point of view: 26 . . . Ei:b8? 27.d5t Wb7
28 .ib6 Wa8 29 .id4 lt::l xd4 30.�xf6 Ei:be8
3 1 .'1Wxa6t Wb8 32.1'l:xe8 t E:xe8 33.h3 ltl f5
34.d6 ltl g3t 3 5 .'tt> h 2 h4 36.'1Wc4 Ei:e4 37.'1Wc7t
Wa8 38 .'1Wd8t 'tt> a7 39 .'1Wxd7t 1 -0.
Otherwise, 2 1 . . .1'l:xe3 ?! 22.lt::l xf8 E:xe2
23.1'l:xe2 'tt> xf8 24.Wi'xc2 Wfxc2 2 5 . 1'l:xc2 'tt> e7
seems to be worse.
•..
27.d5t tiJd4!
This enables Black's queen to help out along
the sixth rank, for example 28 .'1Wc5t Wb7
29.1'l:g1 would be parried by 29 . . . '1Wb6.
2S.Ld4t <±>as 29.�xg6 fxg6
The pseudo-endgame is about equal .
S-30 V. Korchnoi - G. Flear
Wij k aan Zee 1 987
22.tiJxfB gxm 23.Lb6 ixe2 24.ic5 tiJxO!
The required resource!
25.�xe2
Not 2 5 . gxf3?? due to 25 . . . ixf3t.
25 ... ttJxe1 26.ixfB tiJd3!
If 26 . . . ltlxg2 , then 27 .ixg7! is annoying.
27.ia3 d4 2S.tiJd1 c5 29.g3
Maybe 29.b3!? is better with a small edge to
White.
29 ... c4 30.tiJfl ttJxflt 3 l .�xf2 c5 32.�0
�d3 33.<±>g2 �d2t 34.<±>h3 �g5 35.�aSt
<±>h7 36.�e4t <±>hs 37.�eSt <±>h7 3S.Wfe4t
<±>hs 39.�eSt <±>h7 40.�e4t 1/2-1/2
2S ... gcS?!
My opponent pointed out the counter
28 . . . ltl g4! in the post-mortem, e.g. 29.Wfa 1 (if
29.hxg4?, Black has 29 . . . 1'l:e 1 t 30.'tt> h 2 Wff4t
3 1 .'1Wg3 Wfh6t 32 .Wi'h3 Wfxd2-+) 29 . . . Wff4!
30.hxg4 Wfxc7= .
29.Wfd4 h6 30.liJxa6
White has won a pawn.
30 ... gcl t 3 l .gd1 gc2 32.tiJb4 ge2 33.<±>fl
ge4 34.�d5t <±>h7 35.tiJd3 ge3 36.ltJxe5
gxe5 37.�d3 �xd3t 3S.gxd3 b4 39.gd4
ga5 40.gxb4 gxa2
I'm not totally sure that the endgame is lost,
but I couldn't find a way to save it.
4l .gf4 gb2 42J�U3 f5 43.h4 <±>g6 44.<±>e1
<±>h5 45.<±>d1 <±>g4 46.<±>cl ge2 47.b4 ge5
4S.Ei:b3 <±>xh4 49.b5 ge7 50.b6 Ei:b7 5 l .<±>d2
f4 52.<±>d3 f3 53.gxf3 <±>h3 54.<±>e4 <±>g2
55.f4 <±>xfl 56.f5 <±>g2 57.<±>d5 g6 5S.f6 h5
59.<±>e6 1-0
•
S-32 G. Flear - D. Svetushkin
Nimes 2008
4l.ll.'lb4!
I played 4 I .Wi'xg3 ? , but was mated by
4 I . . .Wxc2t 42.b3 '1Wxa2t 43.Wb4 a5t! 0- 1 .
4I ...�f4 42.geS ltJ c4 43.tiJxc6t! bxc6
44.ge7t <±>as 45.gest
And Black cannot avoid the draw.
.,
In the latter stages of games, when most of the pieces have been exchanged, players often have
different p reoccupations than in the middlegame.
They will often need, for example, to focus on the subtleties of the pawn structures, long-term
piece manoeuvres, and king walks into the central arena. Indeed, with less pieces on the board,
they will be aware that kings will be called upon to participate more actively in the struggle.
As in the previous chapters however, one shouldn't forget to take into account tactical weaknesses,
and the positive and negative aspects of both sides' pieces.
If an endgame is favourable and one is thus trying to win, there are three main sources for one's
inspiration:
1 . Theoretical knowledge (what one has learned from books)
2. Erudition (evaluation based on one's playing and analytic experience)
3 . Calculation (what one can deduce by analysing the position on the board)
So it follows that if one doesn't know m uch about endgames, then it's a good idea to calculate
well!
During the p rocess of trying to work out how to proceed, a provisional conclusion to make is to
decide whether one's approach will be an A or P plan of action.
In other words, should one be going for Activity, Aggression or an Attack, or, on the other hand,
for Patience, Preparation, Prophylaxis and Persistence.
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
Although the A approach is typically associated with middlegames, and the P plan with
endgames, one shouldn't be too dogmatic on this point. It is however a good idea to decide if the
way forward involves forcing the issue or not.
Naturally, in both cases, calculation will be required to some extent and you shouldn't forget
that tactical points often appear when least expected. So be ready to exploit them, in order to excel
in the endgame!
Here are some definitions:
Endgames: Positions where each player has a maximum of one piece (not counting the king) .
Pseudo-Endgames: Positions where a player has two pieces and his opponent two or less (again
not counting the king) .
Zugzwang: A case where the player having the move is obliged to deteriorate his own position.
Opposition: A Zugzwang specific to endgames where the kings are facing off and one of them is
obliged to give way.
Here are three examples to demonstrate some endgame considerations.
H. Zschiedrich - G. Flear
Narbonne-plage 2004
Sometimes general considerations are not
enough, calculation is required!
52 g4!
..•
I played 5 2 . . . �g4?, but the idea of activating
the king is less important than pus hing passed
p a wns! After 5 3 .�c2 f4 54.�b3 l:h l 5 5 [email protected]
l':h4 [email protected] Ei: a l [email protected] the game was
agreed drawn. Y2-Y2
The time lost with my king cost me dear!
8
7
6
5
4
53.<i>e2
3
There is no time for 5 3 . �c2 here due to
53 . . . g3 54.<i>b3 g2 .
2
•
53 J�a2t 54.<i>fl g3 55.b5
.•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
And only now should Black play. .
.
55 <i>g4
.•.
. . . and Black should win, due to his
more advanced passed pawns and mating
possibilities.
The moral here could be: Don't get lazy. . .
j ust analyse!
•
Excel in the Endgame!
S. Zeidler - G. Flear
British League 2007
The best move is . . .
8
39 ... E:a2!
7
6
5
4
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
. . . which puts a stop to White's dangerous
counterplay.
I n the game, I played 39 . . . E:h2?? but
following 40.a6! my opponent was back in
the game: 40 ... E:h3t (after 40 ... b6 4 l .a7t
Wxa7 42.E:xc7t Wa6 43.E:c6 White has no
worries) 4 1 .W f2 gh2t 42.Wf3 gh3t Y2-Y2 .
Sometimes a little common sense is
necessary, and unfortunately for me, it was
lacking on this occasion!
40J�bc4 E:xa5 4 I .E:xc7 E:xh4 42.E: l c4
E:xd5
With a clear advantage to Black.
The moral of this tale is: Don't underestimate
your opponent's counter-chances!
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
B. Larsen - G. Flear
London 1 986
8
7
3
Prophylactic moves are commonplace in
endgames. In those with rooks for instance,
it's often stated that one should place one's
rooks behind an opponent's passed pawns to
slow them down. This is often a good strategy,
but calculating the details is important!
2
59.gb8?
6
5
4
0
a
b
c
f
e
d
h
g
8
7
Up to this point, my legendary opponent
had played a fine endgame, but here he slips
up. On the eighth rank the rook doesn't
support, very well, the advance of his passed
pawns.
The precise move is 59.:gb7! and I believe
that White should then win. Here is my
analysis: 59 . . . g3 60.�e2 @e4 (if 60 . . . E:a2t
then 6 U t>fl etc)
6
(analysis diagram)
5
4
3
2
0
I
a
b
d
c
f
e
g
h
6 l .a7! (this is only possible because the rook
is on the seventh rank!) 6 l . . .:ga2t 62.�fl
g2t [email protected] �f3 64.:gf7t �g3 65 .:gg7t �f3
(if 65 . . . @h3 66.b6 Black is too slow: 66 . . . e4
67.b7! e3 68.a8 =�) [email protected]! and Black is
helpless.
59 g3
..•
(diagram)
60.g g8
8
Or 60.�e2 !l:a2t G l [email protected] fl �f4 62.E:f8 t
which comes to the same thing.
7
60 �f4 6 I .gf8t @ g4 62.�e2 ga2t
63.�fl g2t 64.� g l c.!? g3 65.g g8t c.!?h3
66.gh8t 1/z-lfl
6
.•.
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
The white rook would have been perfect on
the seventh {and in particular on g7) , from
where it could support the advance of the
white pawns, whilst keeping the g-pawn in
check.
The moral here being: General considerations
are useful tools to help find ideas, but
calculation is absolutely necessary for
precision .
•
Exercises
9- 1
9-3
•
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
The technique for winning this position
is important. Do you know it?
9-2
0
9-4
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
9- 1 G. Pieterse - G. Flear
9-3 J.M. Mourgues - G. Flear
Ostend 1 987
Dieppe 2009
4o .. J:hd2t! 4t .Ld2 h2
Promotion is inevitable.
0-1
9-2 G. Flear - H. Mas
Hastings 200 1 /2
4I .W/xe7t ixe7 42.a7
And the pawn will become a queen.
Black needs to build a shelter for his king,
whilst cutting off its counterpart.
97 .. J3e5! 98.gbs � d2 99.gdst
IOO.gc8t � d3 10l .gd8t
Or l O I .'it>fl �e4 1 02.�f2 �c4.
1 0 l . .. � c4 102J:k8t gc5
This technique has been associated with
Lucena for the last 500 years!
0-1
1-0
9-4 D. Sellos - G. Flear
Hem 1 984
White hides his king with . . .
48.f5! exf5 49.g5
. . . and after. . .
49 ... ga2
. . . delivers mate . . .
so.ghst � h7 5 I .g6t � h6 s2.ghs#
•
� c3
Excel in the Endgame!
9-7
9-S
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
0
••
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How can White obtain excellent
winning chances?
What result and why?
9-6
a
9-8
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How can White make good progress?
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How should Black continue?
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
9-5 B. Kievelitz - G. Flear
9-7 G. Flear - E. Formanek
Bern 1 993
Hastings 200 1 /2
Black has a distant majority, an important
trump in king and pawn endgames.
36 ... � f7 37. � d3 c5!
In order to prevent 'it>d4.
38.'it>e4 'it>e6 39.g5 b4 40.h4
Or if 40.axb4 cxb4 4 I .'it>d4 a3 42.bxa3
bxa3 , the last queenside pawn will be a decoy
to deviate White's king. Black then wins easily,
e.g. 43.<i>c3 'it>xe5 44.'it>b3 � f5 .
40. . .c4! 41. � d4 c3 0-1
36.lbxc5!
Three connected passed pawns will be
stronger than a piece.
36 ... bxc5 37.i.xc5t <i>d7 38.i.xa7 <i>c6
39.'it>c2 lbd7 40.b4 i.f8 41 .<i>c3 i.d6 42.a4
lb£8 43.i.e3 i.e5t 44.<i>b3 lbe6 45.b5t � c7
46.c5 i.d4 47. � c4 i.xe3 48.fxe3 lbg7 49.a5
liJf5 50.e4 liJe3t 5 1 .<i>d4 lbxg2 52.a6 liJf4
53.b6t � c6 54.a7 lbe6t 55. � e5 1-0
9-8 G. Flear - N. Giffard
9-6 G. Flear - M. Erdogdu
Lille 1 986
Plovdiv 2003
68 ... \Wb7!
White obtains
following:
an
advantage
with
the
25.b5!
69.\Wxb7t � xb7 70J�d1
The passed pawn will be too strong after
either 25 . . . bxa5? 26.bxa6 or 25 . . . axb 5 ? 26.a6
etc.
Equally hopeless is 70.�b 1 if6 7 I .'it>g2
'it>c6 72.'it>f3 'it>b5 73.\t>e4 a4 74.'it>d3 a3 etc.
25 ...ic4 26.bxa6 ixa6 27.l':l:b1!
A handy p i n . It's not clear that White is
already winning, but the position is tough to
defend.
27 ... b5 28.i.e2 � f6 29.B:cl B:aS
Another try, 29 . . J'!d8 ! ? 30.Ek5 �d2 3 1 .ixb5
i.xb 5 32.�xb 5 �a2, would not solve all Black's
problems, but would still be an improvement
on the game continuation.
30.B:c5 e6
If 30 . . . b4? then 3 1 .�c6t.
3 1 .ixb5 ixb5 32Jhb5 :l;ks 33J�ib1! B:as
34.B:a1
White's rook is ideally placed behind the
passed pawn, so the result is no longer in
doubt.
34 ... � e5 35.<i>h2 <i>d5 36.<i>g3 <i>c5 37.<i>g4
f6 38.h5 B:a7 39.h6 � b5 40.f4 <±>a6 41 .B:cl
<i>xa5 42.B:a1 t � b6 43.l':l:xa7 � xa7 44.e4
<i>b6 45.e5 'it>c6 46.exf6 <i>d7 47. � f3 � eS
48. � e4 1-0
•
A wise choice. The endgame favours Black,
as his passed pawns are already far advanced.
70 ... b3! 71 .B:d3
The rook is impotent, for example 7 1 .�d7t
i.c7 or 7 1 .�xd8 b2 72.!'i:d I a4 etc.
71. ..a4 72.B:d4 i.e7 73.B:d7t � c6 74.B:xe7
b2 75.B:e6t 'it>d5 76J�e5t 'it>c4 0-1
Excel in the Endgame!
9-9
8
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9- 1 0
0
Which move poses Black
the most problems?
•
Glenn Flear
9-9 C. Holland - G. Flear
Uppingham 1 987
I missed my chance in this example!
7 1 . ltlh5t!
.•
The game continued sadly with 7 l . . . ti:J d 5 ? ?
72.h7 �xf6t 73.'>�?g8 a n d Black cannot hold
onto both pieces, so a draw was agreed.
n.'tt> g6
Or 72.Wg8 lLl xf6t 73.Wg7 Wc6 74.h7
tLlg4t etc.
n .!Llx£6 73.h7 tLlds!
•..
But not 73 ... ltJ g4?? 74.Wf5 .
74.Wf7 �c3 75.Wgs .!Llf6t 76.Wg7 .!Llg4t
77.'tt> gs lLl h6t
Black then brings up the king.
Naturally, to convert this advantage It s
necessary to know how to mate with King,
Bishop and Knight against a lone king. It's in
the books and I recommend that you make the
effort to learn it!
9- 1 0 M. Barnes - G. Flear
Derby 1 987
Tactimania
'it>b2 49. 'it>d2 'it>xa2 50. 'it>c2=) 4 1 . . . h4 42.f3
d4 43.'it>c4 d3 44. 'it>xd3 'it>xc5 4 5 . 'it>c3 'it>d5
46. 'it>b3 'it>xe5 47. 'it>xa3 'it>f4 48. 'it>b3 'it>g3!
(the h-pawn is more interesting!) 49.a4 'it>xh3
50.a5 'it>g3 5 l .a6 h3 52.a7 h2 5 3.a8='W h 1 =WI
(the endgame is clearly favourable for Black)
54.'Wb8t 'it>g2 5 5 .'Wd8 'Wb 1 t 56.'it>a4 'Wa2t
57.'it>b4 'Wb2t 5 8 .'it>a4 'Wc2t 59.'it>b4 'it>xf3
60.'Wf6t 'it>xg4 6 l .'Wxf7 'We4t and 0- 1 a few
moves later.
40 ... h6 4 1 .f3 d4
There are similarities with the game
continuation, but here, with the pawn only on
h6, the result is different.
On the other hand, passive defence is
hopeless, e.g. 4 1 . . . 'it>b7? 42. 'it>xa3 'it>c6
43. 'it>b4 'it>b 7 44. 'it>bS 'it>b8 4 5 . a4 'it>c8 46.a5
'it>b8 47.a6 WeB 48 .c6 Wb8 49.Wb6! with a
mating attack!
42. Wc4 d3 43.'it>xd3 Wxc5 44. Wc3 Wd5
45. Wb3 'tt> xe5 46.Wxa3 'tt> £4!
Plausible is 46 . . . 'it>d5 47.'it>b4 f5 , bur the
presence of an outside passed pawn gives
White all the chances to win after 48.a3!.
47.Wb4
This endgame is far more involved than I
originally imagined, and I changed my mind a
number of times concerning the assessments of
the various lines. I showed it to several pupils
who also found some interesting ideas and I
must admit that as a result I had to revise my
copy!
Here is a summary of what I now think,
although who knows? Maybe a reader can find
yet another improvement!
The logical move is . . .
40.g4!
.. .limiting the advance of Black's pawns. This
turns out to be an important factor in pawn races
which occur in a number of lines.
My opponent soon went astray in the actual
game: 40.g3 ? ! (this allows Black's h-pawn to
advance further) 40 . . . h 5 ! 4 l .g4? (too late,
whereas White could still hold with 4 1 . f3 !
d 4 42. 'it>c4 d3 43.'it>xd3 'it>xc5 44.h4 'it> d S
4 5 . f4 g4 46.'it>e3 'it> c4 47.'it>e4 'it> c 3 48.'it>e3
•
After 47.'it>b3 'it>xf3 48.a4, Black has an
instructive resource available, i.e. 48 . . . 'it>e4!!
49.'it>c4 'it>e5 50.'it>c5 f5 (two tempi spent by
each king, but the difference is that now White
no longer queens with check) 5 1 .a5 f4 52.a6
f3 53 .a7 f2 54.a8=� fl ='W and Black certainly
shouldn't lose.
47 ... Wxf3 48.a4 e5 49.a5 e4 50.a6 e3 5 1 .a7
e2 52.a8='Wt
White arrives first, but the struggle isn't over.
52 ... Wf2 53.'Wa7t Wfl! 54.'Wxf7t Wg2
55.'We6 Wf2 56.'Wf5t Wg2 57.'We4t wf2
Strangely enough White is unable to make
any progress and the game is drawn! In fact, as
he doesn't have access to the f4-square, he can't
push Black's king in front of the pawn (which
would be necessary in order to bring his own
king any closer) .
So my conclusion is that 40.g4! is best, but
doesn't lead to a win .
Excel in the Endgame!
9- 1 4
9- 1 1
8
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What result and why?
9- 1 2
9-1 5
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Find a way to win a pawn.
9- 1 3
8
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How to make progress?
•
Glenn Flear
9- 1 1 J. Wolfgang - G. Flear
Antwerp 1 993
47... � f7! 48. � f3 � e6 49. � e4
White regains his pawn, bur the struggle is
nor yet over. . .
Tactimania
SO.�xg3 �xh6 S l .bxcS bxcS 52.:!:1.b3 � e4
53.�b5 � d4 54.�xa5 �xc4 55.a4 �d6
56J!a8 � b4 57. � f3 c4 58.a5 � bS 59. � e3
c3 60.�c8 � b4 61 .�h8t � xaS 62J!b3 f4t
63. �xf4 �c6 0-1
4 9. . .d3! SO. �xd3 � dS
White resigned. Black has the opposition
and that is sufficient to win! Here is a plausible
line . . .
9- 14 G. Flear - H. Hamdouchi
Montpellier 2008
My opponent found a nice win.
S l .g3 g6
59 ... f4!
A hint for winning such 'symmetrical'
positions: Black plays the same moves 'as if in
a mirror' and White runs out of moves first.
60J!xf4t
52.h4 hS
The king has to make a decision!
53. � e3 � cS 54. � e4 � b4 SS. � dS �xa4
56. � c4 � a3 57. � c3 a4 58. � c2 � b4
59. � b2 � c4
Both ways of capturing are insufficient.
If 60.gxf4, Black continues with 60 . . . � f3.
60 ... � d3 6l .�f3
Or 6 1 .:!:1.f8 :!:!.dl t 62.�g2 e2 63.:!:1.d8t �c4
ere.
6 l . .. �d1 t 62. � g2 � d2 0-1
9- 1 5 G. Flear - E. Piankov
And Black wins.
Marseille 2006
9- 1 2 M. Ricci - C. Flear
Cannes 2000
This forces Black to make an unpleasant
decision.
32 .. J�e2!
Black has to increase the pressure first!
33.�d3 �e4 34.�f3
If 34.�e3 �f8 (or maybe 34 ... g5!? 3 5 . fxg5
:!:!.xe5 36.:!:1.a l �xg5 37.:!:1.a8t �h7) 3 5 . :!:1. a l
�h6 36.:!:1.a5 �xf4 37.�xf4 :!:!.xf4 38 .:!:1.xb5
:!:!.ce4 the pawn on e5 will fall. Black then has a
clear advantage.
34 ...�xb4! 35.�f2 �xc3 36.�xc3 ixc3
37.�xb5 �xf4 0-1
9- 13 K. Bordi - G. Flear
Nice 2000
Black activates his king with . . .
41...f4! 42.gxf4 � fS
. . . thus obtaining good winning chances.
43.h5 � xf4 44.�g7 f5 45.�g6 �e3?!
4 5 . . . �e5! would have been simpler.
46.h6 �h3 47. �g2 �hS 48.a3 �h4 49.b4 g3
Or maybe 49 . . . axb4 50.axb4 cxb4 5 1 .:!:1.xb6
�g5 .
•
54.h4!
54 ... �xh4
After 54 . . . mf6, White has rhe straight­
forward 5 5 .:!:1.b6t me5 56.hxg5 .
ss.i.xf5t � f6 S6.i.e4 � h 1 57.�f5t � g6
58.�xg5t!
5 8 . f4 is equally possible.
58 ... � xg5 59.f4t � f6 60.ixh1 � fS 6Lid5
h4t 62. � f3 h3 63.ie4t � e6 64. � g3 b3
6S. �xh3 h2 66. � g4 1-0
Excel in the Endgame!
9- 1 6
9- 1 9
8
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9- 1 7
0
0
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9-20
8
8
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4
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0
9- 1 8
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
9- 16 I. Martin Alvarez - G. Flear
9- 19 G. Flear - H. Sauvadet
San Sebastian 2009
Chamalieres 2007
37 ... c5!
53.f7!
The choice of 37 . . . b3? in the game was soon
regretted . . . 38.!!b8t c±>xa5 39.f7 !!xf7 40.cxb3
cxb3 4 1 . c±>xb3 . . . and the endgame is drawn.
4 1 . . .El:f3t 42.c±>b2 c5 43.El:b7 �a4 44.l"k 7
El: b 3 t 4 5 .c±>c2 El:b5 46.�c3 a5 47.�c4 El: b l
48.El:xc5 El:cl t 49.�d4 El:xc5 50.c±>xc5 c±>xa3
5 l .�c4 Y2-Y2 .
The pawn is used as a decoy to unravel the
blockade.
On the other hand, 5 3.c6t? fails to 53 . . . tt:Jxc6
54.f7 tLl e7t!=.
38.axb4
No better is 3 8 . f7 in view of38 . . . c3t 39.�b l
�a4!.
38 ... cxb4 39.f7 r;!;a4 40.c±>cl r;!;a3 41 .1"!c8
gn t 42.r;!;d2 c3t 43.c±>e3 gxf7
53 ... ltlxf7 54.c6t r;!;ds 55.r;!;c4
A slow, but sure way to victory.
White could also force the issue with 5 5 .d7
c±>e7 56.id2 a3 57.ib4t r;!;ds 5 8 . c±>e6 tLlg5t
59.r;!;e5 tLl f7t 60.r;f;f6 a2 6 1 .ia5#.
55 ...a5 56.r;!;c3 h3 57.r;!;b2
Black can do nothing.
57 ... ltlh6 58.ig5t 1-0
Black should win.
9-20 G. Flear - H. Sonntag
9- 17 G. Flear - A. Petrossian
Le Touquet 1 989
Marseille 2005
26.c5!
35.ltl b5!
White thus creates a passed pawn .
Threatening the d6-pawn.
35 ... axb5 36.cxb5
The passed pawn couplet, supported by the
king, is too powerful for the knight.
36 ... ltlc7 37.r;!;c4 ltlf8 38.b6 ltl a6 39.c±>b5
ltlb8 40.a6 ltlxa6 41.c±>xa6 ltld7 42.b7 1-0
26 ... b5
Bad would be 26 . . . bxc5? in view of
27.bxa5.
Otherwise, if 26 ... axb4 27.cxb6 b3, White
keeps the advantage with 2 8 .ie5 ! b2 29 .ixb2
tt:J d6 30 .ia3 tLl b7 3 l .�f3.
27.bxa5 b4 28.if4
9- 1 8 G. Flear - M. Hebden
Southend 2009
White has a forced win if he continues
energetically.
48.h5! r;!;e6 49.g6! hxg6 50.h6 c±>xf6
5 L.ie5t!
The bishop forces the king away from the
promotion square.
5 1 . .. r;!;xe5 52.h7 a4 53.h8=�t r;!;d5 54.�a8t
r;!;c4 55.�a6t r;!;c5 56.�xa4 ltld2t 57.�e2
ltlc4 58.�a7t r;!;d5 59.�f7t r;!;c5 60.�f8t
r;!;b5 61 .b3 �a5 62.�b8t r;!;c5 63.�e5t
1-0
•
.
The more direct continuation, 28.a6! b3
29.a7 b2 30.a8='W b l ='IW 3 l .if4, would be
even more convincing for White.
28 ... e5 29.id2 b3 30.ic3 r;f;f7 3 Lr;f;f3 r;!;e6
32.d4!? r;!;d5 33.dxe5 fxe5 34.a6 ltlc7 35.a7
ltla8 36.r;!;e3 g6 37.r;!;d3 e4t 38.r;!;e3 ltlc7
39.ib2 ltlaS 40.ia3 ltlc7 41 .r;!;d2 r;!;c6
42.r;!;c3 ltlb5t 43.r;!;xb3 ltlxa7 44.r;!;c4 llJ b5
45.ib4 ltlc7 46.r;!;d4 r;!;b5 47.ia3 r;!;a4
48.ic1 1-0
Excel in the Endgame!
9-24
9-2 1
••
8
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0
a
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What result and why?
9-22
•
9-25
8
8
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0
a
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0
a
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What result and why?
9-23
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What result? Can you find
a convincing line of play?
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
9-2 1 G. Flear - A. Mirzoev
9-23 G. Flear - G. Vallin
Menton 2004
Montpellier 200 1
49 .. J�f5!
White can win by force.
The game continued with 49 ... tt:Ja8?
50 .�xd5 tt:J c7 5 1 .�h5 �f6 52. c;!{c4 c;!{c6 5 3 . b4
a6 54.�h8, when White had realistic drawing
chances.
[email protected] tt:Jxf3 57.gxf3 @xh5 [email protected] @h4
[email protected]!
50.axb6
The threat is . . . ctJ d7, when by maintaining
two pawns, Black would be winning
comfortably.
50 ... axb6 s u;bs c;!(c6 52.c;!{b4
Or 5 2 .�b4 b 5 , and White will have to play
the remainder of the game without his rook!
Moving towards Black's king . . .
5 9. . [email protected] 60.a5 @xf3 61 .a6 @e2 62.a7 a
63.a8='1W f2 64.'1Wg2 @e1 [email protected] fl ='IW
66.'1Wd2#
. . . in order to help with the mating net!
Against a queen, a lone f- or h-pawn on the
seventh rank can at times enable the defending
side to draw, but not if the stronger side's king
is too close.
52 ... �f4 [email protected] !hd4t 54.�b4 @c5
Black wins.
9-24 J. Plaskett - G. Flear
Hastings 1 984/5
9-22 G. Flear - A. Muir
Torquay 2002
[email protected]!
After the inferior move [email protected]? , played
by me in the game, White lacks shelter for his
king, and then after 5 2 . . . �a4t [email protected] �a5 t
54.c;!{c4 �a4t 5 5 [email protected] � a l 56.�g6t c;!{h7
57.c;!{c4 �d l ! I never looked like winning.
52 ... e3
Or if 52 . . . �a6, then 5 3 .�g6t! �xg6 54.fxg6
e3 5 5 . c;!{xe3 @xg6 56.c;!{e4 with a winning
position.
53.�g6t @h7 54J�e6
White will pick up the pawn in far more
favourable circumstances than in the game,
and must surely win .
•
The win comes from a pawn breakthrough.
38.!!xc4! @xc4 39.h4! @xb4 40.g4! a5 41 .g5
1-0
White gets there first.
9-25 S. Karjakin - G. Flear
Hastings 2002/3
109.!!f7t! 1-0
It's a straightforward win.
109 ... !!xf7 1 1 0.gxf7 @xf7 1 1 1 [email protected]! @g7
1 1 [email protected] c;!{f7 1 1 [email protected] @e7 1 [email protected] @d7
1 1 [email protected] c;!{ds 1 [email protected] @es 1 [email protected]
@ds 1 1 8.e6 @es 1 1 9.e7
The pawn will promote.
Excel in the Endgame!
9-26
•
9-29
8
8
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Can White win?
a
b
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What result? Any particular reason?
9-30
9-27
8
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Find the best line of play for Black.
What result and why?
9-28
8
7
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b
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f
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h
What result and why?
•
Glenn Flear
9-26 G. Flear - F. Chevaldonnet
9-29 R. Weill - G. Flear
Metz 1 984
Nimes 2008
It's worth remembering that if White is left
with only his dark-squared bishop and an
a-pawn, he cannot win if Black tucks his king
in the corner. Efforts to oust the king from a8
would then only lead to stalemate.
So White has to hold onto his b-pawn .
65 . .id8! bxa5 66 ..ixa5 �b5 67.b4!
48 ... �g5!
With the terrible threat of 49 . . . h4t 50 �h3
Elh2 mate!
The only way to avoid immediate defeat for
White is to exchange rooks, bur then after. . .
49J:!e5t ltlxe5 50.'it>xf2 lLlf7!
. . . the endgame is winning for Black. . .
The b-pawn is defended and Black can only
stand by and watch as White mops up Black's
remaining pawns.
5 I .<i>g3 ltld6 52.ic2 <it> f6 5 3 .id3 g5 54.c4
�e5 55.�f3 �d4 56.ifl a4 57.a3 'i!?c3
58.'i!?e3 h4 0-1
67 ... �c6 68.�g5 �d6 69.�xh5 �d5
70.�g5 �e5 7I ..ic7t �d5 72.�f5 �c6
73 ..ia5 �d5 74.�f6 �d6 75.�f7 1-0
9-30 J. Bellon Lopez - G. Flear
If Black insisted on seeing more then
75 . . . �d7 76.�f8 �c6 77.�e8 �b5 78. �d7
�c4 79.�c6 would surely be enough to
convince anyone.
9-27 S. Conquest - G. Flear
Sanxenxo 2003
•
Graz 1 984
My choice was . . .
26 ... cxb2!
However, there is a second plausible way,
26 . . . id4 27.bxc3 Elxc3 28.�e2 Ele3t 29.�d2
E1a3 30.Eib7t �f8 3 1 .Eid l Elxa2t , which is
also favourable to Black. However, I still prefer
the move played in the game.
White found the way to victory as follows . . .
27. 'i!?x£2 E1c2t!
67.�f3! g6 68.ixd5 exd5 69.<i>g4 �xh7
70.�xg5 �g7 7l .b5
Instead, the immediate 27 . . . Eicl ? would fail
in view of 28.Eie l .
28.<i>g3 E1cl
Zugzwang.
7t. .. <i>f7 n.<i>h6 �f6 73.g4 1-o
Black regains the rook and emerges with an
extra pawn.
I was then able to convert my advantage in
the endgame.
Another Zugzwang.
Now after 73 . . . �f7 74.g5, it's all over.
9-28 A. Harley - G. Flear
British League 2004
Despite the almost symmetrical pawn
structure, Black's king is more active and can
get at White's weakness on b2.
43.. J!xb6 44..ixb6 a4 45.�g3 .ici 46.id4
�e6 47.ic3
Otherwise, 47.�f2 �d5 48 .ic3
49. 'it>e2 �b3 comes to the same thing.
'it>c4
47 ... 'it>d5 48.<i>h4 <i>c4 49.<i>h5 �b3 50.�g6
ixb2 5 l ..ixb2 <i>xb2 52. 'it>xg7 a3 53. 'it>xh6
a2 54.g5 fxg5 55.'it>xg5 a1 =Wf 56.h4 Wfg1 t
0-1
•
Tactimania
29.E1xb2 E1xh 1 30.E1b7t 'i!?f8 3 l .E1xa7 E1al
32.'i!?f2 f5 33.g3 <i>g7 34.h4 h6 35.<i>f3
'i!?f6 36.E1a8 'i!?e5 37.E1a7 'i!?f6 38.E1a8 <i>g6
39.E1a7 e5 40.Eia6t f6 4I .'i!?e3 Elg1 42.'i!?f2
E1a1 43.a4 E1a2t 44.'i!?g1 �h5! 45.E1xf6 <i>g4
46.E1g6t 'it>f3 47.E1f6 'i!?xg3 48.Eixf5 Elxa4
49.E1fl (49 .Eixe 5 ? 2"\al t) 49 ... E1xh4 50.E1f6
e4 5 I .Eig6t 'i!?f3 52.Eif6t 'i!?e2 53.<i>g2 e3
54. 'i!?g3 Elh1 55.Eie6 Elglt 56. 'i!?f4 Elfl t
57.'i!?e4 Ela1 58.'i!?f4 Ela4t 59.�g3 h5
60.Eib6 E1g4t 0-1
Excel in the Endgame!
9-3 1
•••
9-33
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
b
Can you find a way for Black to make
progress and ultimately win?
9-32
0
c
d
e
f
g
h
g
h
What result?
9-34
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How should White continue?
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
What result?
•
Glenn Flear
9-3 1 R. Pert - G. Flear
British League 20 1 0
Black has a promising rook manoeuvre.
44 .. J�a2! 4S.ltlxh4 gd2
One of the pawns will fall, and White seems
to be in trouble.
46.ltlf3
After the alternative, 46.mh5 �xd4 47.g4
�c4 48.g5t mf7, Black should win.
46... gxg2t 47.mf4 ge2 48.ltlgS ge7 49.ltlf3
ge4t SO.mg3 mfS S l .ltlh4t mgS S2.ltlf3t
mf6!
Zugzwang!
S3.mf2 �fS S4.c6 ges SS.ltleS �e4 S6.c7
gcs S7.ltlf7 gxc7 S8.ltld6t �d3! S9.�f3
gd7 60.ltlf5 gf7 0-1
9-32 M. Hennigan - G. Flear
Hastings 1 987/8
Tactimania
Zvjagintsev, and published the resulting analysis
that convincingly demonstrates that despite
White only having rwo pawns remaining he
can indeed win.
40 ... �e6 41 .�£4 ltlc8 42.�gS �f7 43.a4
aS
If 43 . . . a6 44.�c5! mg? 45 .a5 mf7 46.h3
�g7 47.mf4 mf6 48.me4 �e6 49.h4, it's
Zugzwang.
An alternative sequence, 43 . . . ttl b6 44.a5
ttl c8 45 .h3 a6 46.�c5 mg? 4?.mf4 mf6
48.�e4 me6 49.h4 comes to the same thing.
44.�cs mg7 4S.h3 �f7 46.mh6 �f6 47.h4
�fS
Or 47 . . . mf7 48.mh7 mf6 49. mg8 etc.
48.�g7 �g4 49.�£6!
But not 49.mxg6? mxh4 50.mf5 mg3
5 l .�e6 mf4 5 2 .md7 �e5 5 3 .mxc8 mds
54.�b6 mc4=
49 ... �xh4 SO.�e6 gS S l .�d7 g4 S2.�xc8
White then wins!
48.f6t!
White creates a passed pawn.
After 48 . ttl h 5 ? ttl e2 49.ttlxg7 ttl xd4 50.f6t
mf8 , as played in the game, White didn't have
any advantage in the complications.
48 ... gxf6t 49.mh6 b3 SO.g7 b2 S l .ltlfSt
md?
Or if 5 1 . . . mf7, then 52.mh7 me6 53.g8 ='1Wt
mxf5 54.\Wg6t �f4 5 5 .\Wc2 etc.
S2.g8=\W b l =\W S3.\Wh7t �d8 S4.\We7t
�c8 SS.ltld6t �b8 S6.\Wd8t ma7 S7.\Wc7t
�a6 S8.\Wxc6t \Wb6 S9.\Wa8t \Wa7 60.\WcSt
�aS 61 .\Wc3t �a4 62.\Wa1 t
And wins!
9-33 Z. Krnic - G. Flear
Wijk aan Zee 1 98 8
A draw was agreed a t this point, b u t it seems
that my opponent underestimated his winning
chances. Mark Dvoretsky took a close look at
this endgame, along with Russian GM Vadim
•
9-34 G. Flear - M. O'Hara
Uppingham 1 988
White's winning method is instructive.
41 .�b7! �bS 42.d7 ltle6
Originally, I thought that 42 . . . ttl c6 43. me?
mc5 44.d8='1W ttl xd8 4 5 .mxd8 md6, led to
a draw, but I was wrong! See the next note,
where all will be revealed!
43.�c8 mc4
If 43 . . . mc6 44.d8='1W ttl xd8 4 5 . �xd8 md6,
the superiority of White's king makes all the
difference, e.g. 46.me8 me6 47.mf8 �f6
48.mg8 h5 (if 48 . . . g5 49. �h7 h5 50.h4! then
gxh4 5 1 .�h6 etc) 49.h4 me6 50.mg7 me?
5 l .f3! me6 52.f4 me? 5 3 . f5 ! gxf5 54.mh6 and
White wins!
44.d8=\W ltlxd8 4S.�xd8 f5 46.£4 �d4
47.�e7 me3 48.�£6! mx£4 49.�xg6 mg4
SO.�xh6 �h4 S l .�g6 �g4 S2.h3t 1-0
Excel in the Endgame!
•
9-35
9-37
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
a
•
•
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
b
d
e
f
g
h
9-38
8
a
c
How to make progress?
What result and why?
9-36
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How should Black continue?
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What result and why?
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
9-35 P. Blatny - G. Flear
9-37 0. Foisor - G. Flear
Oakham 1 988
Montpellier 2008
White's bishop dominates its counterpart.
I found the right way in the game.
57.ieS! i.d8
S2 ... lbh4t! S3.c;t?g4 f3! 54.c;t?g3
The exchange of bishops after 57 . . . ixe5
5 8 . fxe5! �e6 5 9.�d3 �d5 60.�c3 �e6
6 l .�c4 transposes to the game continuation.
S4 ... i>f5 SS ..ic6 �xgS
S8.�d3 ie7 S9 ..ih8 ids 60.ig7 .ic7
6L.ie5 .ixeS
Following 6 1 . . . id8 62 . .id6 Black's bishop is
out of moves, so Black's king must cede terrain,
for example 62 ... �e6 63.�c4 �d7 64.d5 etc.
62.fxe5 �e6 63.i>c4 f4 64.i>d3 i>f5 6S.dS!
cxdS 66.bS! �xeS 67.b6 1-0
One of the pawns will land on the eighth
rank.
A good example to show that we shouldn't
be too dogmatic about what constitutes a good
or bad bishop!
If 54.�xh4? f2 , the pawn goes all the way.
With two pawns to the good, Black is now
winning comfortably.
56 ..ie4 i>hS S7 ..id3 gS S8 ..ie4 �h6 S9 ..id3
�g7 60.�g4 cj.?£6 6Li.fl a6 62.i.d3 ltlg6
63.i.xg6 i>xg6 64.�xa �hs 6S.�e4
Or 65 .�g3 aS.
6S ... �h4 66.�f5 aS 0-1
9-38 A. Grischuk - G. Flear
French League 2006
White can get away with capturing the b5pawn and is therefore winning!
4UhbS! �xbS
9-36 J. Laurier - G. Flear
If 4 l . . .a2, then the sequence 42 . .ie6t �g7
43.E!:b7t �fG 44 . .ixa2 wins.
Dortmund 1 989
42.Lbs c;t?£8
Black needs
immediately.
to
make
a
passed
pawn
39 ... a5!
In the game, I played the imprecise
39 . . . �e6?!, and after 40.�f3 , only then did I
push 40 . . . a 5 , which proved to be too late. The
remaining moves were 4 l .bxa6 bxaG 42.g4!
fxg4t (or 42 . . . a5 43.gxf5 t �xf5 44. tLl c3
tLlxd4t 4 5 .�e3 tLlb3 46.tLlxd5=) 43.�xg4
tLl e3t (43 . . . a5 44.f5 t �f7 45 .�f4 a4 46. tLl c3
a3 47.�e5 lLJ e3 48.tLla2=) 44.�f3 tLl fS
4 5 . � f2 aS 46.�e 1 tLl e3 47.�d2 tLl g2 48.�c3
�fS 49. �b3 �e4 50. tLl c3t �xd4 5 1 . tLlxdS
�xdS 52.�a4 tLl xf4 5 3 .�xa5 Y2-Y2.
40.bxa6 bxa6 41 .�0 aS 42.g4
Alternatively, if 42.tLlc3 tLlxd4t 43.�e3
tLl c2t 44.�d2 lLJ b4, then Black wins.
42 ... fxg4t 43.i>xg4 a4 44.ltlc3 a3 4S.�f5
ltlxd4t 46.�e5 ltle2! 47.ltl a2 d4 48.�e4
ltlc3t
Black is on the road to victory.
•
Not 42 . . . a2? , because of the check 43 . .ic4t.
43..ic4 �e7 44.�h2 i>d6 4S.�g3 �cS
46 ..idS i>d4 47.c;t?g4 h6 48.h4 �e3 49.h5
gxhSt SO.�xhS �f2
No better is SO . . . a2 S l ..ixa2 �xe4 52.c;t?xh6
� f4 53.�h5 e4 54.g4 e3 5 5 .ic4 etc.
S l .�xh6 �xg2 S2.�gS �f3 S3.�f5 1-0
¢
0
•
0
()
0
0
0
0
l:J o
•
Vigorously resisting until the bitter end is the way to save many a dubious position.
I n order to develop this theme, I will be combining the themes of the previous two chapters,
Defensive technique and endgame play.
In those cases where one is worse in a simplified position, j ust staving off the opponent's tactical
tricks may not be enough. Apart fro m the evident requirement to analyse carefully whilst paying
attention to detail, the defender should in my opinion be asking themselves the following question:
What should the overall strategy be to save the game?
There are three distinct approaches, these are:
1 . Staying passive throughout.
2 . Playing actively from the off.
3. Passive for the moment, but with the intention of going active at the right moment.
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
If you believe that you can hold a difficult position without changing anything very much, then
simply temporizing may be the best way to defend. Why bother to undertake anything positive
when, more likely than not, it would help your opponent?
If, on the other hand, sitting on your hands will simply enable your opponent to make inexorable
progress, then you will need to play more actively. The may mean straight away, or sometimes only
after due preparation.
The word 'active' , in the context of endgames, can mean several things such as 'starting a counter­
attack' , 'creating a diversion' , 'provoking a forcing continuation' or simply 'placing a queen or rook
on a square from where it will be able to harass the opponent' .
In the following exercises, the solution will often need a certain activity on the part of the
defender, but not always!
Here are some examples:
G. Flear M. Chandler
-
London I 990
White has to react immediately.
49.a4!
The passive 49.'�c3? loses to 49 . . . a5
50. rJ;>c2 b4 5 l .a4 rJ;>a I 52. rJ;>b3 rJ;>b I .
49 ... bxa4 50.�cl
0
Black is unable to win.
lfz-1/z
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
G. Flear M. Chandler
-
Blackpool I 98 8
Here, against the same opponent, I settled
for a passive defence to save the game.
45.�f5 �xf5 46J�xf5 �ha4
If you mentally removed the rooks as well
the pawns on f2 and g3, then the endgame
would be drawn, as Black would not be able to
oust White from h i without giving stalemate.
However, it's worth knowing that the
analogous situation (King, bishop and wrong
rook's pawn) , with an additional pair of rooks
can be won.
So my defensive strategy was to avoid
touching my pawns (as I didn't want to risk
losing them before the exchange of rooks), as
I couldn't see any way for my opponent to
break down the fortress .
as
0
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Until the Bitter End!
47.l3f4 l3a2 48.l3g4 i.eS 49.l3e4 i.d6
50. @f3 i.cS 5 U�e2 l3a6 52.l3c2 l3f6t
[email protected] .ih6 54.l3e2 @g6 [email protected] @f5
[email protected] .id4 [email protected]£3 l3b6 [email protected] l3b3
[email protected] hS [email protected]
Continuing
to
wait.
Not
exactly
constructive, but here . . . very effective!
60 ... l3b6 61 [email protected]£3 l3a6 [email protected] l3a4 [email protected]£3
i.eS [email protected] l3a8 65. @f3 We6 66.l3e4 Wf5
67.l3e2 l3a4 68.Wg2 .id4 69.Wf3 .ia7
70.Wg2 Wg4
(diagram)
7I .l3e4t!
I could also have continued to temporize,
but this tactical shot trades rooks and leads to
a clear draw.
0
71. l3xe4 72.f3t W5 73.fxe4t Wg4 74.e5 i.h8
75.e6 id6 76.e7 .ixe7 77.Whl id6 78.Wg2
ic7 79.Whl @f3 [email protected] .id6 st.wht wfl
82.g4!
•.
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
82.'it>h2 allows 82 . . . h4, but even this is
drawn after 83.'it>h l .
82 ... hxg4 Stalemate! %-lfz
82 . . . h4 83 .g5 if4 84.g6 ie5 8 5 .g7 ixg7
86.Wh2 ie5 t 87.Wh l ! is a book draw if
White stays in the corner, due to the inevita­
bility of stalemate if Black gets too close.
G. Flear - V. Epishin
Spanish League 2008
In this example I underestimated
opponent's active defence.
my
57.l3e2?
I should have continued with 57.E!f8 !, for
example 57 . . J'!b3 5 8 J'!d8 'it> f4 59.E!xd5 We4
60.E!d6 and, in this case, Black's counterplay
is insufficient.
57 l3a2t ss.wdt �hi t [email protected] l3a2t
60.We3 l3a3t 6 t .Wfl Wf4! 62.l3e5 l3a2t
63.Wel l3a4 64.l3xd5 We3
..•
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
The threats of mate stop White from
making any progress.
65.Wfl Wf3 66.l3f5t 'it>e4 67.l3h5 l3al t
[email protected] l3a2t [email protected] %-lf2
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
G. Flear - G. Szitas
Valras-plage 1 996
I had headed for this position imagining that
I would win easily, but I hadn't foreseen my
opponent's remarkable defence.
8
7
54 ... c!tk2 55.ic5 tlJal! 56.e3 'it>e6 57.ia7
'it> e5 ss.J.bst 'it>f6 59.if4 'it>e6 60.J.bs
'it>f6 6l .ia7
6
5
4
The knight stays in the corner, if need be,
and protects the b3-pawn. Black's king j ust
has to stop any passed pawn that White
creates.
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
6l ... 'it>e6 62.J.d4 'it>d6 63.e4 fxe4 64.fxe4
'it>e6 65.J.c3 'it>d6 66.e5t 'it>e6 67.'it>d4
. . . and the king doesn't have to give way, as
Black can now temporize with his knight. . .
67 ... c!lJc2t V2-V2
•
Exercises
1 0- 1
1 0-4
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
1 0-5
1 0-2
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
1
1 0-3
8
7
6
5
4
3
•
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
10- 1 B. Sharp - G. Flear
10-4 M. Geveke - G. Flear
Leicester 1 989
St Vincent 2003
59.�g5t! �xg5
Stalemate! lf2-lf2.
1 0-2 G. Flear - X. Beudaert
French League 200 1
77.�f4!
A great defensive tactic.
Instead 77.ixg5 ? doesn't work: 77 . . . fxg5
78.�e4 ttl d2t 79.Wf5 ttl f3 80.We4 ttl h4
8 l .�e5 Wd3 82.Wf6 ttl f3 and wins.
77 ... @d3
74 ... @£4?
Equally bad is 74 . . . We6? because of
7 5 . ttl d4t.
The only move was 74 ... Wd5!, for example
7 5 . Wxh6 b2 76.ttl d2 Wd4 77.�g5 Wc3
78. ttl b 1 t Wc2 79.ttla3t Wb3 80.ttl b 1 Wc2
with a draw.
75.tLld2 b2 [email protected]
The black king cannot move across to
support the pawn!
Or 77 . . . gxf4 78.Wxf4 ttl d6 79.g5, and
White draws.
78.ic7 tLle5t [email protected] @e2 80.id8
With the bishop now so active, Black is
unable to make any progress.
80 ... lLld7 81 .�e7 @e3 82.�d8 @e4 83.�e7
@ds [email protected] @d4 [email protected] @e4 86.�d8
@e3 87.ie7 @e2 [email protected] @e3 1/2-lfl
10-5 G. Flear - J. Gallagher
76 ... @e5
Dinard 1 986
76 . . . We3 77.ttl c4t yields the same result.
77.tLlc4t @f6 78.tLlxb2 @f7 79.tLld3
The endgame is now trivial.
79 ... @gs so.tLle5 @hs S I [email protected] @gs 82.h6
@hs S3.tLlf7t @gs s4.h7t 1-o
10-3 L. Van Wely - G. Flear
French League 2002
34... tlJf5?
An oversight.
Nor is the other knight move 34 . . . ttl g8 ?
acceptable, because of 3 5 .Eixf7.
I should have played 'to keep everything in
place' with 34 ... E\e6! 3 5 .Wc2 Wc7 36.Wd3
�c6 and I don't see how White can make any
progress.
35.�h5!
The pin ensures that White wins the
exchange by force.
35 ... �xe3 36.fxe3 tLlxe3 37J3h8t @c7
38.�h7 tLld5 39.�xf7t @c6 40. @c2 a5 41 .a3
b6 [email protected] tLl c7 [email protected] tLl a6 44.�f6t @b7
45.�g6 tLl c7 [email protected] tLl b5t [email protected] tLlc7t
[email protected] tLl b5t [email protected] tLld4 50.�g4 tLl b3
5 1 .�c4 a4 52. @d6 b5 53.�h4 @b6 54.�h8
@b7 55.�g8 1-0
•
42.c5!
A nasty surprise for my opponent, especially
as the pawn cannot be taken, e.g. 42. .. ttl xc5
43.l"i:d5# or 42 . . . Eixc5 43 .l"i:xd3 .
42 ... b2 43.�a2 f5
Otherwise, 43 . . . ttl e 1 t 44.�e2 ttl c2 4 5 .ib 1
ttlxe3 46.Eixb2 ttl xg4 would also probably lead
to a draw after 47.l"i:c2.
44.exf5 gxf5 45.gxf5 lLlxc5 46.�xb2 @xf5
47.�b 1 t @e5 48.�h2 �cl 49.�h5t @d6
50.�h7 �fit 5 1 [email protected] 1/2-lh
Until the Bitter End!
1 0-9
1 0-6
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
1 0- 1 0
1 0-7
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
1 0-8
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
Which of these would you opt for:
57.�f5 , 5 7 .<kti f5 or 57.g5t?
•
Glenn Flear
10-6 M. Chandler - G. Flear
Bath 1 987
37.h4?
The calm move 37.\t>fl ! would emphasize the
strange disposition of pieces along the d-file.
Black would be unable to unpin, and so would
have nothing better than 37 . . . �f2t 38.Wgl
�d2 allowing 39.cj{fl ! with an imminent draw
by repetition.
Tactimania
example 57 . . . �e3 (if 57 . . . �h 1 , then 5 8 .cj{ f4
�fl t 59 .Wg3; whilst following 57 . . . �f3t
5 8 . cj{e4 �fl 59 .We3 g5 60.�b4, White should
hold) 5 8 .cj{ f4 �e5 59 .�b2 etc.
57 ... g5t! [email protected] @g6 59.a:f3
Or 59 .�a5 �g3 etc.
59 .. J�h4!
If 59 . . . �xf3 ? 60. Wxf3 cj{f7 6 1 . Wf2! cj{e6
62.cj{e2, White can use the distant opposition
to make a draw.
37.. J&d1 t [email protected] lLlxb2
60.a:g3 f5t 6 I [email protected] f4
Now, Black unpins and has two extra
pawns.
Now having a protected passed pawn, Black
is well on the way to victory.
39.l:'�xd1 lLlxd1 40.i.xb7 a5 4I [email protected] lLlc3
42.a3 b5 0-1
62J�g1 a:h3t [email protected] @f6 64.a:g2 @es
65.�g1 @e4 66.a:g2 f3 67.a:g1 @f4 0-1
This fortunate last-round victory enabled me
to obtain my final GM norm.
10-9 L. Milesi - G. Flear
St Affrique 2002
10-7 C. Duncan - G. Flear
Hastings 1 993/4
36JH7!
Instead 36.g4? turned out to be a fatal loss
of time in the game: 36 . . . �f4 37.h3 b3 (now
Black can get his rook behind his b-pawn)
38 .�h8 Wc5 39.�b8 �b4 40.�d8 b2 4 l .�d 1
�c4 0- 1 .
36 ... b3 37JU'8! @c? 38J�U7t @cs 39JU'8t
@d? 40JU7t @d6 4I .a:b? c5 [email protected]!
White isn't worse. It seems that if he has time
to get his rook behind the passed pawn, then
his chances of getting something out of the
game increase dramatically.
5 1 .�f3!
My opponent failed to save the actual game:
5 l .�b8t? Wc3 52 .�c8 �d 1 t 5 3 .Wa2 �d5
54.�h8 Wc2 5 5 .�h4 c3 56.�h2t �d2 57.�h l
c4 5 8 .�g1 �d 1 59 .�g2t cj{d3 60.�g3t cj{d4
6 l .�g4t Wc5 0- 1 .
5 I ..J;h2
If 5 l . . . c3 , White reacts with 52.�f8 �h2
53 .�b8t Wc4 54.�c8 c2t 5 5 .Wb2.
52.a:g3
White is able to draw using a technique
associated with Philidor.
52 ... a:hs 53.a:f3 a:as 54.a:g3 ga3 55.gg2
gh3 [email protected] c3t [email protected] c4 ss.a:gs
Black will be unable to escape the checks.
10-8 P. Degembe - G. Flear
St Vincent 2002
1 0-10 P. Wells - G. Flear
Malta 1 989
57JU5?
The only move of the three that loses!
Simplest is 57.g5t fxg5 t 5 8 . Wg4! (but not
5 8 .�xg5 ?? �f3t! 5 9 .Wxf3 Wxg5 60.cj{g3 g6)
58 . . . �h4t 59.cj{g3 �a4, as Black cannot do
very much with a pair of g-pawns, e.g. 60.�b3
Wh5 6 l .�c3 �a1 62.�b3 g4 63.�b 5 t g5
64.�b8 �a3t 6 5 . cj{g2 g3 66.�b4 g4 67.�b8 .
Otherwise, 57.cj{f5 is also possible, for
•
4U�xf7t! @xf7 42.b7
One of the pawns will promote.
42 .. J:�xa7 43.b8='\W a:d? 44. @f2 l[jf6 45. '\Wc8
cj{g7 46.'1Wc3 g5 47.®g2 a:e? 48.'\Wc5 @£8
49.'1Wf5 g o so.®h2 h6 lfz-lfz
Until the Bitter End!
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Black played 66 . . . ttJ xf3 .
Was this a good choice?
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••
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Glenn Flear
Tacrimania
10- 1 1 N. Pert - G. Flear
10-13 G. Flear - C. Monroy
Great Yarmouth 2007
Guingamp 2008
64 ... <i>xg3!
Black must capture the knight!
Retreating with 64 . . . �g5 ? doesn't work:
6 5 . f7 tt:'l f8 66. tt:'l e4t �xh5 67.<i>f6 �h6
68.tt:'lg5 tt:'l d7t 69.'it>e7 tt:'le5 70.f8 =Wt with
check!
65.<i>f5 <i>h4 66.<i>g6 .!iJf8t
If 66 ... tt:'l xf6?, White calmly continues with
67.h6!.
67.<i>g7 <i>g5 68.h6 llJe6t 69.<i>f7 liJd8t
70.<i>g7 llJe6t 71 .<i>f7 liJd8t n.<i>e7 llJ c6t
73.<i>f8 <i>xh6 74.f7 llJe5 1/2-%
10- 1 2 B. Taddei - G. Flear
French League 2008
5 1 .gc6!
My opponent went astray with 5 l .� b l ?,
and after 5l ... !!xg4 5 2 . f6 !!f4 5 3 . f7 h5 54.!!c5
h4 5 5 .!!h5 gxf7 56.gxh4 �b3 57.!'1h3t c3
5 8 .gh l gf2 he resigned (0- 1 ) , as Black is
winning easily, e.g. 59.!'\gl !!b2t 60.'it>c l !!a2
6 l .�b l c2t 62.'it>c l !!al t etc.
5 I ...<i>c2
Following 5 l . . .gxg4 52.!'1xh6 !!f4 5 3 .gh3t
�b4 54.�b2 !!xf5 5 5 .!'1g3 !!f2t 56.�b l
c3 57.!'1g8 , it's a draw. Another example of
Philidor's defensive technique (see also 1 0-9) .
I had j ust played the thunderbolt 6 l .!!h 5 ! and
my shocked opponent was unable to find the
best defence.
6 1 . .. <i>xh5?
Correct is 6 l . . .f3! when the following
remarkable sequence seems to be best play:
62.h7 (62.!'1h2 f2 63.!'1xf2 !!h3 64.!!f6 also
leads to a draw) 62 . . . f2 63 .!!h4t! (63 .h8=W?
is bad, because 63 . . .fl =Wit comes with check!)
63 . . . 'it> f5 64.!!h5 t �g6 65 .!!h6t! �f7 66.!'\fGt!
�g7 (A pretty series of checks where White's
rook was en prise on h 5 , h4, h6 and f6 and was
never captured!) 67.!'1xf2 and the endgame is
drawn.
62.h7 <i>g4 63.h8='1W <i>g3 64.'1Wh1
White has good winning chances, bur I'm
still nor sure if Black can draw with best play.
64 ... e5
Or 64 . . . �f2 65 .Wh2t 'it> f3 66.�d4 e5t
67.�d5 !!e2 68 .Wg l !!e3 69 .Wfl t �g4 70.'it>e6
and White continues to make progress.
65.'1Wfl ge4t 66.<i>d5 ge3 67.<i>e6 <i>h2
68.'1Wf2t <i>h3 69.<i>f5 e4 70.'1Wfl t <i>h2
7 1 .'1Wxf4t gg3 n.<i>xe4 <i>g2 73.'1Wd2t <i>h3
74.'1We2 ga3 75.<i>f4 ga4t 76.<i>f.3 ga3t
77.<i>f2 <i>h2 78.'1We5t 1-0
10-14 Y. Solodovnichenko - G. Flear
52.<i>a2!
Instead, the passive try 52.!!xh6 c3 53.!'\aG,
seems to be inadequate, for example 5 3 . . . !!d4
54.f6 �d2 5 5 . f7 (or 5 5 .!!c6 c2 56.g5 c l =Wt
57.gxc l �xc l 5 8 .�a2 � c2 59.�a3 !!f4 etc)
55 . . . c2 56.!'\cG c l =Wt 57.!'\xc l 'it>xc l 5 8 .�a2
!!f4 and Black wins.
•
Nimes 2008
66 ... .!Llxf.3!
In fact this is the most convincing way to
ensure a draw.
67.<i>xf.3 <i>xa6 68.h4 <i>b5! 69.h5
Or 69.'it>e3 �c4 70.'it>d2 �d4=.
52 ... c3 53. <i>a3
69... <i>c4 70.h6 <i>b3!
The point becomes clear, White's king avoids
slipping into a mating net.
Avoiding an eventual check on h8 and at the
same rime preparing 7 l . . .d2.
53 ... h5 54.gxh5 gxf5 55.h6 gf7 56.gc4
<i>d3 57.!'1g4=
7 1 .<i>e3 <i>c2 72.h7 d2 73.h8='1W d 1 ='1W
lf2- l/2
Unci! the Bitter End!
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Black played 42 . . . Ei:xa7. Was this wise?
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Would 5 l .We4t be a good idea?
1 0-20
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Glenn Flear
10- 1 5 G. Flear - I.Rausis
French League 1 998
Tactimania
�h7 64.�f7t �h6 65.�f8t �h7 66.�e7t
�h6 1/2-1/2
10- 1 8 G. Flear - H. Happel
42 ... l3xa7!
Montpellier 2006
Well j udged, as it saves the game!
43.l3xa7 �xa7 44.�c5 e5 45.�d5 �b6
46.�e6 �c5 47.�xf6 �d5 48.�g5 �e4
49.�xh5 �f3 50.�g5 �xf2 5 1 .�f5 �f3!
An important move that has two functions.
52.�xe5
If 5 2 . h 5 , then 52 . . . e4 leads to a draw.
52 ... �g4 1/2-1/2
82 ... �e8!
Black shouldn't allow the pawn to go any
further: 82 . . . tt'l c6? 83.g6 tt'l e7 84.g7t c;i;>e8
8 5 .ib3 c;i;>d8 86. i> f7 c;i;>d7 87.ic4 i> d6
88 .ie6 1 -0 being the end of the game.
83.�g7 ltlc6 84.id5 ltle5 85.�f6 ltld7t
86.�e6 ltlf8t=
10- 1 6 I. Argandona Riveiro - G. Flear
10-19 G. Flear - P. Tregubov
San Sebastian 2005
5 1 .�e4t!
A good move!
The game instead finished tragically for my
opponent: 5 I .'.Wa3 ? ? \Wh3t 0- 1 .
5 1 ...�xe4t 52.�xe4 �g5
Or 52 . . . c3 5 3 .i>d3 c;i;> f5 54.i>xc3 c;i;>e4
5 5 .c;i;>d2 c;i;>f3 56.c;i;>e1 f5 57.c;i;>fl f4 5 8 .c;i;>e 1
c;i;>g2 5 9. i> e2 i>g 1 60.c;i;>f3 = .
53.�d4 �f4 54. �xc4 �e4
No better is 54 . . . c;i;> f3 5 5 .c;i;>d4 f5 56.c;i;>e5 = .
55.�c3 f5 56.�d2 �f3 57.�e1 �g2 58.f4!
A useful resource in such positions.
58 ...�g3 59.�e2 �xf4 60.�fl
With a book draw.
French League 2008
60.�g4!
The king is now ready to go to the f3-square
if the pawn advances.
In the game, 60 .ic2? turned out to be losing:
60 . . . e3 6 I .id 1 ih8 62.i>e6 c;i;>e4 63 .ic2t
c;i;>f4 64.id3 d4 0- 1 , as Black would carry on
with . . . i>f3 and . . . e2 etc.
60 ...ih8
After 60 . . . c;i;>e3 6 I .ia2! (switching the
attack) 6 I . . .d4 62.c;i;>f5 (back again!) 62 . . . ih8
63 .id5 d3 64.ixe4 d2 65 .ic2 it's drawn .
6 I .�f4 if6 62.ia2 ie5t 63.�g4 e3 64.�8
�d3 65.ixd5 e2 66.ic4t=
10-20 G. Flear - C. Foisor
10-17 G. Flear - P. Orlov
Montpellier 2008
Toulon 1 986
54 ...ig6!
The plausible 54 . . . ib5, is refuted by 5 5 .c6
ixc6 56.c;i;>c4 id5 t 57.c;i;>xb4 ixa2 5 8 .c;i;>xa3 ,
with a winning position.
55.c6
Certainly not 5 5 .ixg6? c;i;>xg6 56. i> d3 b3! as
Black gets there first.
55 ... Lc2 56.c7 b3! 57.c8=� b2
White cannot stop Black promoting on the
queenside, so has to take a perpetual check.
58.�d7t �g6 59.�xe6t �xg5 60.�f6t
�h5 61 .�h8t �g6 62.�g8t �h6 63.�f8t
•
39.ixa6! e3
Not 39 . . . bxa6? , due to the fork 40.lt:lxc6t
followed by 4 I .tt'lxd4 .
40.�fl ! ic3
After 40 . . . exf2?, the pawn isn't that danger­
ous, and so White has time to capture all the
queenside pawns: 4 I .ixb7 c;i;>e6 42.tt'lxc6 ie3
43 .ia6 and White has an advantage.
Otherwise, 40 . . . ixc5 4 1 .fxe3 ixb4 42.exf4
ixa5 43 .ixb7 is surely drawn.
4I .ltlxb7 ixb4 42.fxe3 ltle6 43.ltl d6 f4
44.exf4 ltlxf4 45.ic8 ixc5 46.ltle4 ib4
1/2-1/2
I n this chapter, you will be confronted with a selection of relatively difficult exercises, involving a
wide mix of tactical themes.
My advice is to take your time! There is no rush! Get a good feel for what is going on, then find
the variations that will help you avoid traps, and ultimately, enable you to select the next move
with confidence.
You won't be certain i n these exercises if you are seeking something dramatic or quiet,
advantageous, or only equalizing, but this is exactly the case in our own complicated struggles.
Don't be put off if you find them tough. If you have understood many of the essentials of the
position, you will give yourself chances to find the best move. I ndeed you may at times be able to
do better than the players in the actual game!
First of all, some examples to warm up the neurons!
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
Correct is the immediate . . .
27 ... gxf2!
•
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G. Flear - F. Westphal
Dortmund 1 98 5
Th e question could be: Black should decide
between 27 . . . gxf2 , 27 . . . li:l f3 and 27 . . . �b8.
Which one would you opt for?
As a rule, I have given plenty of detail in
the answers in order to convince you of my
assessments!
Less good is the flashy 27 . . . li:l f3 ? ! , in view
of 28.�xf3 Wh 1 t 29.'tt> e 2 Wxg2t 30.�d3
Wxf3 3 1 .Wg7t �b8 32.Wg5 , although even
so, after 32 . . . �e4t 33.�xe4 Wxe4t 34.�d2
Wg2t, Black would have some drawing
chances.
The choice in the game was even worse:
27 . . . 'tt> b 8? 28.li:ld4 Wh i t (or 28 . . . gxf2
29.li:lxc6t bxc6 30.Wb4t 'tt> a 8 3 l .�xf2 We5
32.Wf4 with a White advantage) 29.�e2
Wh5t 30.�el gxf2t 3 1 .'tt> x f2 li:l e4t 32.�xe4
Wh4t 33.�gl Wxe4 34.li:lxc6t bxc6 3 5 .Wxc6
Wxc6 (if 35 . . . Wxe3t 36.\t> h l We5 37.Wd7
both kings are vulnerable, but White is still
better) 36.�xc6 �xe3 37.'tt> f2 �d3 38 .�c2
and I went on to win the endgame . . . l -0.
28.Wfg7t <il?bs 29.'1Wxg5 Wfgl t 30.<il?e2
.ih5t 3 1 .<ii? d2 fl =Wf 32.!txfl Wfxfl 33.'1Wf4t
Wfxf4 34.exf4 ge2t
When Black is on top.
G. Flear - C. Adrian
French League 1 997
The question in this example could be: How
to escape with Black?
8
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27 �d2t!
•..
6
The exchange ofqueens after both 27 . . . W c8 ?
5
28 .Wc6 and 27 . . . Wxb 5 t ? ! 28 .El:xb 5 , would be
difficult for Black due to White's queenside
majority.
4
3
28.<ii? fl Wfe4!
2
•
But not 28 . . . li:l e4t? ! , as White could then
get away with 29.�e3!, whereupon Black
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would have to accept a dodgy endgame.
29.'1Wd7 Wfxf4t 30.<il?e2 Wfe4t!
Also possible was 30 . . . Wfl t 3 l .�xd2
Wf4t!.
3 1 .<ii? d l Wfg4t 32.<il?xd2 Wfd4t 33.<il?c2
Wfc4t 34.<il?b l Wfd3t 35.<ii? a2 Wfxd5t 1!2-1/2
•
Exercises
1 1 -4
1 1 -1
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Would White be wise to
capture the bishop?
1 1 -5
1 1 -2
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How can Black hold?
Black has to choose between
23 . . . lt:l d 5 and 23 . . . ixe2 .
7
1 1 -3
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•
Glenn Flear
1 1 -1 F. Sanz Alonso - G. Flear
Andorra 1 984
Tactimania
�g7 43.l"i:xg6t �f7 44.d8='1W iWh l t 45 .Wg3
'.Wxh3t 46.�f2 '1Wf3t 47.Wg l Wfl t 48.Wh2
Wh i t 49.�g3 iWh3t 50.�f2 Yz-Yz.
30Jhc6?
33 .. J3gS
Bad for tactical reasons. Whereas, my
opponent could have had a playable game after
30.1:'k l .
Neither 33 . . . \Wxd7 34.l"i:f8 t , nor 33 . . . l"i:xd7
34JWe8t '1Wg8 3 5 .\Wxd? last for long.
30 .. J3e2 3 l .Wi'xd5t 'i!lhS 32.f4?
Limiting the damage with 32.l"i:xh6t! is
an improvement, but Black would still have
good winning chances after the continuation
32 . . . gxh6 33 .WI'd4t Wl'g7 34.\Wxg?t Wxg7
3 5 .l"i:d l l"i:bb2.
34.l"i:d1 l"i:dS 35.'\West WigS 36.\We7 h6
37JM6 hS 3S.l"i:xg6! \Wxg6 39.\WxdSt 'i!lh7
40.WI'e7t Wh6 41 .\WfSt
A useful move in helping defend along the
first rank.
4l. .. <bh7 42.dS=Wf Wfb 1 t 43.ltlfl
And White wins.
32 ... l"i:elt 33Jhe1 \Wxe1t 34.'i!lh2 \Wh4t
3S.<bg1 l"i:b1 t 0-1
1 1-4 G. Flear -W. Kaiser
So, White shouldn't snatch the bishop!
1 1 -2 G. Fleac - S. Kindermann
Zug 1 983
23 ...ixe2?
Black would have a clear advantage after
23 . . . tt:l d 5 ! 24. tt:l xd5 l"i:xc2.
24.i.f5!
A fine intermediate move.
24 ... ltlg4
Black loses material following 24 . . . '1Wd8
2 5 .exf6 ixd l 26.fxe7 Wxe7 27.tt:lxd l .
Biinde 1 98 5
Penetration with . . .
26 ...\Wc2!
. . . is awkward for White.
The inferior 26 . . . tt:l d3 ? didn't work out
well in the game: 27.Wxa6 tt:l f2t 28.l"i:xf2
ixf2 29.d6 Wd3 30.tt:le4 �e l 3 l .l"i:xe l Wfxd2
32.l"i:g l 1 -0.
27.l"i:ad1 Wfxb2 2S.f5 ixc3 29.fxg6 ixd2
30.gxh7t <bhS 3 l .l"i:xd2 Yffg7
Black has an extra piece.
1 1 -5 P. Wells - G. Flear
2S.Wi'f4 Wi'xfS
Edinburgh 1 98 5
There aren't any decent alternatives.
26.WI'xf5 �hc3 27J3e1 id3 2S.\Wxg4 ixh 1
29.id2 l"i:b3 30.ixa5 g6 3 l .h3 hS 32.\Wd7
ih4 33.l"i:c1 b6 34.id2 l"i:d3 3S.if4 'i!lh7
36.\Wxa7 l"i:xd4 37.g3 idS 3S.e6 �hf4 39.e7
gxa4 40.exf8=ltlt 1-0
1 1 -3 G. Flear - J. Hjartarson
Chicago 1 983
I missed the following strong move . . .
33.\We6!
Indeed I completely lost the thread in the
game: 33.h3? h5 34.l"i:d l Wh7 3 5 . tt:l e2 ia8
36. tt:l f4 c3 37.tt:le6 '1Wf6 38.tt:lxd8? (38.�h2!
c2 39.l"i:fl ! still wins!) 3 8 ... \Wxd6 39.l"i:xd6
c2 40.tt:le6 c l =Wft 4 1 .�h2 ixg2! 42.tt:l f8t
•
I didn't find the pretty draw starting with . . .
26 ...WI'xf5!!
I instead played 26 ... l"i:g8 ? , and lost after
27.\Wf3 tt:ld5 28.fxe6t Wxe6 29.0-0 We4
30 .ixb5 l"i:xg2t?? 3 l .Wxg2 l2J e3t 32.Wh 1
lDxfl 33 .'1Wxe4 l"i:xe4 34.ixfl E!:b4 3 5 . b3 We5
36.ic4 f5 37.l"i:a 1 l"i:b7 38 .E!:a5t � f6 39 .Wg2
1 -0.
27.W/g7t 'i!leS 2S.\WgSt 'i!ld7 29.\WxaS
gxe2t! 30.'i!lxe2 WieSt
White cannot escape from the perpetual
check.
Tricky Decisions
1 1 -9
1 1 -6
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What is the defensive idea?
1 1 -1 0
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Should White continue with the solid
32.�e4t or try the ambitious 32.g4?
Which is best: 27.�b 5 ,
27.�c8 or 27.�xc4?
••
1 1 -8
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•
Glenn Flear
1 1 -6 E. Prie - G. Flear
Montpellier 2003
Tactimania
27 ...�c3 28.id3 ixfl.t!
The attack would be alarming
28 . . . ixd3 ?! 29.liJxd3 "I.Wxc2 30.1":\bS ! .
after
34J�d2!
29.�xfl. ixd3 30.cxd3 axb4 3 1 .�e4 �c2t
.. .is necessary.
White lost quickly in the game after 34.:!:l:xf4??
"I.Wxf4 3 5 .l":i:d2 "I.Wd6 36.'\We l l":i:de8 0- 1 .
Less precise is 3 l . . .l":i:d4 32.l":i:xd4 '1Wxd4t
33 .'1We3, as White then may even have a pull.
34 . ..lil h3t
Or 34 . . . 1":\xdS 3 5 .1":\xd S ! (rather than
3 5 .l":i:xf4?? l":i:xf4 36.l":i:xd5 Wf2t 37.Wh2 l":i:h4#)
35 . . . li:l h3t 36.gxh3 '1Wxe4 37.l":i:d8 etc.
32.�g1 �xb 1 t 33.�h2 �xd3 34.�g4t �g6
35.�xg6t fxg6 36.�xg6t
A draw is available.
1 1 -9 G. Flear - P. lten
35.gxh3 '1Wxe4 36.tZ'lf6t! gxf6 37Jhd8
Zug 1 983
And White is okay.
29 ...�xg3t
1 1 -7 G. Flear - G. Danner
Lugano 1 983
White can consolidate his advantage with . . .
30.�f2
27.ixc4!
Not however
30 . . . �d6t .
. . . when he has two extra pawns.
27 .. Jhb2 28.ib5
And White is already winning.
Unfortunately, in the game I erred with
27.ib 5 ? and was hit with 27 . . . l":i:xd6! 28.l":i:aa 1
(or 28.l":i:xd6 l":i:e 1 t 29.<;t>h2 ie5t 30.g3 ixd6
3 I .ixd7? ixa3 32.bxa3 l":i:cl and Black is
favourite) 28 . . . 1":\xd 1 t 29.l":i:xd 1 liJ b6 30.<;iJ f1
if6 3 I .l":i:d6 l":i:e6 32.l":i:xe6 fxe6 33.li:l d 1 Y2-Y2.
Otherwise, the third option, 27.ic8 , is
similar after 27 ... 1":\xd6 28 .1":\xd6 l":i: e 1 t 29.<;t>h2
ie5 t 30.g3 ixd6.
1 1 -8 J. Mestel - G. Flear
London 1 986
27.ie2!
For the attack to get anywhere, White must
eliminate the main defender, which is the
light-squared bishop.
Instead, the game tipped in Black's favour
after 27.l":i:b3? l":i:fe8 28 .1":\eb 1 '1Wc5 ?! (simply
28 . . . axb4!) 29.liJd3? (29.ih 5 ! wouldn't have
been so clear) 29 . . . "1Wxc2 30.id 1 1":\e I t! 3 I .<;t>h2
l":i:xd 1 32.l":i:b8 "I.Wc7t 0- 1 .
•
In the game, Black went wrong and soon
had to resign, i.e. 29 . . . �cl t ? 30.id 1 "I.Wxg3t
3 1 .Wd2 l":i:c6 32 .l":i:xf7t! 1 -0.
30. Wd2?,
because
of
30 ... �g1 t 3 1 .�fl �g3t 32.�f2 �g1 t
33.ifl �cl t 34. �d2 �xfl.t 35. �xcl �xfl t
36.�d1 �c4t 37.�c2 �fl t=
1 1-10 V. Chuchelov - G. Flear
French League 2009
32.g4?
This proves to be too compromising.
My opponent should have settled for
32."1We4t "I.Wg6 33 ."1Wxg6t <;t>xg6 with an extra
pawn, although Black would then have good
compensation.
32 ...�xh3! 33.�e4t g6 34.�xc2 tZ'lf4
White has snatched a rook, but his king is
impossible to defend.
35.�e4
If 3 5 . f3 , then 35 . . . "1Wg3t 36.<;t>fl (equally
hopeless is 36.<;t>h 1 "I.Wxf3t 37.<;iJh2 tt:J e2)
36 . . . '1Wxf3t 37.<;t>g1 li:l e2t etc.
35 ... �xg4t 36.�h2 �h4t 37.�g1 tZ'lh3t
0-1
Tricky Decisions
1 1 -1 1
1 1 -1 4
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
1 1 -1 2
0
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b
c
d
e
f
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h
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
1 1 -1 s
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
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b
c
d
e
f
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h
a
b
c
d
e
f
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•
1 1 -1 3
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
•
Glenn Flear
1 1 - 1 1 M. Huerga Leache - G. Flear
San Sebastian 2009
43.Wfe6!
The game was drawn after 43.b5? Wh7!
44.g4 \Wc2t 4 5 . �g3 Wfb 1 46. ltJ f5 (if 46.\Wg8t
Wxh6 47.Wfh8t Black has the handy defensive
move 47 . . . Wfh7) 46 . . . \Wg 1 t V2-V2.
Otherwise after 43.g4? Wh7 44.g5 \Wc2t
45 .Wg3 \We i 46.lU g4 \Wg 1 t , White's king can't
escape from the checks.
Tactimania
id4t 29.Wh 1 Wf7 30.ic3 ixc 5 , no longer
had any advantage.
Alternatively, 26.\We2? is also inferior because
of 26 . . . ixc5t 27.Wfl f3! .
26.. J3xd2
If 26 . . . ixc5t, White has 27.ie3!.
27.tlJe4 idS 28.Wfc3
. .. with a big advantage.
1 1 -14 G. Flear - J. Fedorowicz
Chicago 1 983
43 ...Wfc2t
Following 43 . . . Wxe6 44.dxe6 gxh6 4 5 . b 5
id8 46.b6, the bishop i s overloaded.
44.�h3 �h7 45.Wf5t
. . . with a winning endgame.
1 1- 1 2 M. Grignon - G. Flear
Narbonne-plage 20 1 0
3 1 J3fl !
The game continuation was disappointing
for my opponent: 3 1 .lUxe4? Wff3 32.\Wd3
(32.\Wxf7t? \Wxf7!) 32 . . . lU xe3 33 .Ek8t Wg7
34.Ek2 Wfl t 0- 1 .
Another plausible move is 3 1 .\We2!?,
although then 3 I . . .\Wf3 32.E!e 1 h6!? 33 .Wfg2
Wfxg2t 34.Wxg2 E!f2t 3 5 .Wg1 E!xh2 36.lUxe4
E!a2 would offer Black reasonable drawing
chances.
25J�b4?
A blunder.
An improvement is 2 5 .E!e2, e.g. 25 . . . if6
26.ib3 E!e8 27.ic5 lU c8 28 .ixf7 E!xe7
29 . .ixe7 ttl xe7 when the result would be in
doubt.
The nuance, 2 5 .E!f4 f5 26.E!b4 offers a better
version of the game, as after 26 . . .�f8 (26 . . . E!e8
can be well met by 27.lUxg6! Wxg6 28.�xb6)
27.�xb6 �xe7 28 .E!d4, the resource E!d7
comes to White's rescue.
25 .. J�e8
The knight is out of squares!
26.ic5 iffi 27.a4 a5 28J3f4 f5 29.ixb6
cxb6 30.c!l)xf5 gxf5 3 1 ..!3xf5 cbg6 32.ic2
.!3e1 t 33.cbd2 ib4t 0-1
1 1- 1 5 G. Flear - J. Cooper
3 l . .. c!l)xe3
Alternatively, 3 l . . .Wfxfl t 32.\Wxfl E!xfl t
33.Wxfl lUxe3t 34.We2 lU f5 3 5 .d5 g4
36.lUxe4 Wf7 37.Wd3 would be difficult for
Black.
32.Wfxf7t Wxf7 33J3xf6t cbxf6 34.c!l)xe4t
Wf5 35.c!l)d6t cbe6 36.c!l)b5 a6 37.c!l)c7t
cbd6 38.c!l)xa6 tl1 c4 39.c!l)c5 c!l)xa5 40.c!l) e4t
cbd5 4l .c!l)xg5
I think that White should be winning here.
1 1 -13 0. Jackson - G. Flear
Hastings 1 983/4
26.WO!
My opponent instead opted for 26.lUe4?, but
following 26 . . . E!xd3 27.ltJ xf6t ixf6 28.cxd3
•
Blackpool 1 988
The modest-looking move . . .
29 ...Wfc4!
. . . embarrasses White.
My opponent instead continued with
the natural 29 . . . E!e2? , but it proved to be
ineffective: 30.E!xe2 E!xe2 3 l .�f6 Wd2?
(3 l . . .�d8! 32.Wfd4 Wfxd4 33 .�xd4 �b6 with
sporting chances to hold out) 32.\Wh3! 1 -0.
30 . .!3g1
If 30.Wg2 E!d5 3 l .b3, Black has a win with
3 1 . . . E!xd4!.
30...ixd4 3 l .Wfxd4 .!3h6t 32.cbg2 .!3e2t
33 . .!3xe2 Wfxe2t 34.Wffl .!3h2t
And wins.
Tricky Decisions
1 1 -1 6
1 1 -1 9
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
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b
c
d
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0
••
a
b
c
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e
f
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•
1 0- 1 7
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
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h
a
b
c
d
e
f
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h
1 1 -1 8
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1 1- 1 6 G. Flear - J. Hickl
1 1- 1 8 M. Sandu - G. Flear
Tel Aviv 1 989
Montpellier 2006
I chose the wrong square!
The best bet in this sharp position is . . .
37.i>g1 !
41 J�b7!
. . . is correct.
In the game, following 37.�fl ? Wxb7 38.Wc6
Wa6, the pin was bad news for White, and then
the further moves 39.�g1 Wa 1 t 40.<j;Jh2 �fl
4 l .�d7t � f8 42.Wf5t �g8 enabled Black to
obtain a winning position.
. . . with complications that seem to be about
equal, for example:
37 ...'1Wxh3
The difference here after 37 . . . �xb7 38 .Wc6,
is that Black cannot count on the deadly pin
that occurs in the previous note.
38.ttl7xd6t i>f8 39.\Wfl '!Wg4t 4o.<j(h2
There is nothing better than taking a
perpetual check.
1 1 -17 G. Flear - A. Vajda
Montpellier 2003
41 ...ttld6! 42J�c7t! i>d5 43.ic6t i>e5
44J�e7 dxc3t 45.i>xc3 gb1 46.ixd6t i>xd6
47.gxe6t i>xe6 48.ixf3
The endgame is drawn.
Alternatives in the initial position are not as
trustworthy:
1 ) Following 4 l .gc7t?! <j;Jb6 42.gc6t <j;Jb7
43.ie5 id5 ! , the passed f-pawn offers Black
the advantage.
2) The game continued with 4 1 .cxd4 t?! 'tt> d 5!
42. <j;Jc3? (White has more practical chances
with 42.ga7! �xd4! 43.ga3 f2 44.ia7t <j;Jd5)
42 ... gb 1 43.ih5 li:l xd4 44.ig3 li:l e2t 45 .<j;Jd2
li:lxg3 46.ixf3t �e5 47.ge7 li:l f5 48.ge8 gg1
49 .ie2 li:l d6 0- 1 .
White can even dare capture the pawn with . . .
1 1 - 1 9 G. Flear - L. Gutman
60.'1Wxc6!
London 1 987
. . . as then . . .
6 0. . .'1Wc2t 6 1 .i>e3 '!Wb3t 62.i>d4 '!Wxb4t
63.i>d5 '!Wb3t 64.i>d6
. . . yields a decisive advantage.
Unfortunately, this is j ust analysis, as at
the time my blunder 60.�c4?? allowed Black
to turn the tables: 60 . . . gg7 6 1 . <j',lf3 W g4 t
62.�f2 ge7 63.b5 cxb5 64.Wxb5 Wxe6 6 5 . c6
f5 66.Wb2t <j;Jh7 67.g4 �e 1 t 68.<j;lf3 Wh 1 t
69.�g3 �g l t 0- 1 .
Another try 60.We2, leads to complicated
play: 60 . . . gg8 (60 . . . gxf4t 6 l .gxf4 Wxf4t
62.�f3 Wxh2t 63.�fl �g7 64.Wxc6 Wf4t
6 5. � g1 �xb4 is messy, but nevertheless
probably drawn} 6 l .e7 ge8 62.<j;Je l Wb l t
63.� f2 Wf5 =
It was so hard to find the best move at the time,
especially as I had just let slip a big advantage .
48.e5!
Black has roo many threats in each of the
following variations:
1} 48 .Wxh3 ? �e3 49.li:lxa5 b3-+
2) 48 .We2? ixh2 49 .�xh2 b3-+
3) 48.li:l xa5? (the game) 48 . . . ixh2 49 .Wxh3
Wxa5 5 0.Wxh2 b3 5 1 .�e2 Wxa4 5 2 .Wd3 Wb4
5 3 .We3 Wc4 54.Wf3 Wc2t 0- 1 .
48 ...'1We3 49.ttlxa5 fxe5
Better than 49 . . . ixh2?! 50.exf6t <j;lxf6
5 1 .Wxh3 ixg3 52.Wh8t <j',lf5 5 3 .�a2, when
White would have the superior position.
50.fxe5 '!We4t 5 1 .i>a2 '!Wxd5t 52.ttl b3 '!Wd7
53.'1Wxg1 '!Wxa4t 54.<j(b 1 '!Wxb3 55.'1Wd4
With a balanced endgame .
•
Tricky Decisions
1 1 -22
1 1 -20
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
a
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0
a
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h
1 1 -2 1
•
•
Glenn Flear
1 1 -20 G. Flear - A. Martidis
Heraklion 1 984
22.h3!!
With so many pieces already in the thick of
battle, it's surprising that this modest pawn
move is correct.
22 ....ih5 23 ..ixa2�!
Even stronger is 23.g4! Elxe 1 t 24.Eixe 1 \Wb2
2 5 .i.xc6.
Tactimania
Wxg4 45 .h3t Wh5 46.Eixh6t Wxh6 47.i.f8t
Wg6 48.Eig7t Wh6 49.!!xd7t Wg6 so.Eig7t
<;t>h6 5 I .Eic7t Wg6= and all that . . . is basically
forced!
Alternatively, 36.E\f6t \Wxf6 37.Eixf6t Wxf6
38 .�xc5t Wf5 39 .'1Wb 1 Elee2, wouldn't give
Black any problems.
36 .. J'!e2 37.'1Wb 1 t \We4 38.l:!f6t c;!.>h?
39.l:!t7t c;!.>gs 4o.!!f8t c;!.>h? 41.!!1t7t c;t.>gG
42.!!f6t c;!.>h?=
23 .. J�xd3 24.g4! ltl d4!
1 1 -22 D. Anderton - G. Flear
24 . . . Eixe l t? 2 5 .l:!xe 1 j ust suits White.
British League 2006
2s. c;t.>n !!dd2�
White is certainly better after 25 . . . Eixh3, but
Black could retain hope, e.g. 26J'!xe2 tt:l xe2
27.Eic4 i.xg4 (similarly with 27 . . . i.g6 2 8 .l2J d5
h5 29.Eic8t 'it>h7 30.'it>xe2) 28.E\xg4 l2J c3
29.i.c4.
26.l:!xe2 l2Jxe2 27.l:!e1 .ig6 28 .ic4! 1-0
•
1 1 -2 1 P. Large - G. Flear
Southport 1 983
35 \Wxe6!
.•.
I played 35 . . . dxe6? which should lose:
36.\Wc7?? (missing a win with 36.\Wb 1 ! \We4
37.Eie 1 !) 36 . . . \Wb7 37.\WaS Elxg2! 3 8 .'1Wc3 Elg4
39.\Wf6t <;t>h7 40.h3 Elh4 4 l .Wg1 e5 42.\Wf7t
'1Wxf7 43.Eixf7t <;t>g6 44.!! 1 f6t <;t>hs 45 .Eih7
i.xh3 46.i.xc5 l:!c4 47.Eifxh6t Wg4 48 .ie3
Elb8 49.1'!xh3 l:!b3 50.Wh2 Elc2t 0- 1 .
The final way to capture the pawn,
3 5 . . . Eixe6? , isn't great: 36.\Wd8 Elxg2 37.\Wxc8
Eld2 3 8 .\Wg8t <;t>hs 39.'1Wf7t Elg6 40.i.xc5!
with advantage. The bishop is taboo, and
the endgame will be difficult to hold a piece
down.
Finally, 3 5 . . . \Wd2?! 36.Eig1 \Wb4 (36 . . . dxe6?
37.\Wc6) 37.\Wxb4 cxb4 38.e7, yields the better
game for White.
36.h3!
Instead, 36.'1Wb 1 \We4 37.'1Wa 1 \Wd4 38 .\Wb 1
\Wd2 39.!!3f2 Ele2 40.Eif6t seems to be equal.
Continuing further, the variation leads to an
aesthetic conclusion, i.e. 40 . . . <;t>h7 4 1 .Eif7t
Wg6 42.!! 1 f6t �h5 43 .\Wfl Elcl 44.g4t
•
26.g3!
My opponent played 26.l2Jh6t?, but he
didn't obtain any compensation for his pawn
after 26 . . . \Wxh6 27.Eixd4 \Wg5 28 .\Wd3 Elxd4
29.\Wxd4 a6.
Even worse, 26.Eixd4? Elxd4 27.\Wxd4? , loses
on the spot to 27 . . . Eie l t .
26 ... gelt!
26 ... l2J f3t leads to a draw, e.g. 27.<;t>g2
\Wxc4 28 .Eixd8 l2J h4t 29.<;t>h2 l2J f3t 30.�g2
l2J h4t=.
27.gxe 1 !
Instead, 27.Wh2? i s refuted b y 2 7 . . . Eixd 1
28.Eixd I b 5 ! .
27 ... llJ f3t
White would obtain a strong initiative after
27 . . . \Wxd2?! 28 .Eie7.
28.c;!.>h1 '!Wxd2 29.l:!e3 gd4!
The retreat 29 . . . l2J g5 ? is bad because of
30.\Wf4 with an attack.
Nor is 29 . . . \Wd 1 t?! 30.<;t>g2 l2J e 1 t satisfactory,
because White would then have 3 I .Eixe I ! \W xe I
32.tt:lh6t Wg7 33.\Wxf7t <;t>xh6 34.\Wf4t <;t>g7
3 5 .\Wc7t Wh6 36.\Wxd8 with all the chances.
30.lLlh6t! c;!.>hs! 3 1 .gest c;!.>g? 32.\Wxt7t
c;!.>xh6 33.'1Wxf3
Or 33.\Wf8t Wg5 34.<;t>g2 \Wd l 3 5 .\Wxf3 = .
33...\Wdl t 34.\Wxd1 gxd1 t 35.c;!.>g2 gd7=
As we approach the end of the book, it's time for a chapter with experienced players in mind.
In hard-fought encounters, when play becomes m urky, we are often confronted with situations
where it is impossible to see as much as we would like. Nevertheless, in our own games, whatever
the difficulty, we still have to make our next move.
You will, as usual, be asked to maximize the chances for the side whose turn it is, but here to
j usti fy your decision, you will probably have to delve even deeper into the labyrinth of variations.
As in the real world, even if you think that you have found the key move, it will at times be j ust
one step along the long and winding road towards an unknown destination!
Later, i n the solutions, you will be able to see how close your line of reasoning and calculations
were to mine.
These relatively tougher exercises are ideal for training purposes, and you may find that comparing
your efforts with those of some friends will enable you to get closer to the truth of what is really
going on.
You can, if you like, also test yourself i n a more concrete manner than in the previous chapters.
In the solutions you will notice that I have included a point-scoring system. This is roughly based
on the principle that each move in the variations that earns a ' ! ' is worth a point. So scribble down
plenty of variations, and then compare them with those in the solutions, as you will increase your
chances of a good score!
The maximum number for each exercise is indicated at the beginning of each solution . There are,
in total , 78 points to be scored:
GM perfo r m a nce
I M perfo r m a nce
I nternati o n a l player
Tou r n a ment player
C l u b player
Apprentice
Beg i n ner
60 points or more
50 to 59
40 to 49
30 to 3 9
2 0 to 2 9
1 0 to 1 9
9 o r less
As a general rule, an effective way of improving your playing level is to analyse complicated positions
and try to find the best continuation. If you do this regularly (without an analysis engine!) you will soon
notice the difference in your over-the-board calculating ability.
•
Chess is not an Easy Game
Here is an example to illustrate the point-scoring system.
G. Flear M. Illescas Cordoba
-
Plovdiv 2003
8
7
(7 points) The total for this 'exercise' .
6
35 .. .'�f7!
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
( 1 ) As there is an exclamation mark, this
earns a point.
The game finished peacefully with 35 . . . 'it>g8
36.'\We8t 'tt> g7 37.'1We7t 'it>g8 Yz-Yz.
My opponent had very little time remaining
and the match situation permitted him to
settle for a draw.
In the post-mortem, we were able to work
out how Black could play for more.
36.'�e5t
Or 36.'\We2 ltJ e4!, ( 1 ) Seeing this move
would enable you to score a second point!
36 ...'�£6 37.'�'d5 ttl e4!
( 1 ) Another ' ! ' , that makes three.
38.'�d7t �f7!
8
( 1 ) A fourth point.
39.�d4t
7
6
(diagram)
5
4
39 ... �h6!
( 1 ) A fifth point!
3
40.�e3t g5!
2
•
( 1 ) A sixth point!
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
4 l .�gl ttlxflt 42.�g2 d l =� 43.�xdl
ttlxdl 44.�d4 �d5t!
The last one may seem deep into the game,
but the final '!' would still earn you a seventh
point!
So this introductory example could (if
it were a real exercise) have given you a
maximum of seven points.
There is no obligation to bother with
scoring, you have the choice, but it may help
you to be even more focused on your search
for 'tactical points'!
•
Exercises
1 2-3
1 2- 1
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
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b
c
d
e
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h
1 2-2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
c
d
e
f
g
h
••
1 2-4
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
•
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
0
1
a
b
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
12-1 M. Lomineishvili - G. Flear
1 2-3 G. Flear - W. Watson
Tunis 2000
Hastings 1 984/5
(4 points)
36J�d7t! ( 1 )
The game ended with 36J:%h7? 1"1.f8 37.1"1.d7t
@e8 38.1"1.e7t ci>d8 39.1"1.d7t @e8 40.1"1.c7 @d8
Yz-Yz.
Remarkably, despite lacking a rook, White
can play for more.
36 ... We8 37J�h7! ( 1 ) 37 .. J'Us
37 . . . 1"1.c6 loses to 38.1"1.c7! ( 1 ) .
38.d7t Wd8 39.dxc8='1Wt Wxc8
Material is back to level, but White has the
initiative.
40,ga7! ( 1 ) 40 ... c2
Mter 40 . . . ci>b8 4 1 .1"1.a2, Black has even less
chances than in the main line.
(2 points)
26.tlJd5! ( 1 ) 26 ...\Wds 27.tLlxc6 tLlxc6
28Jhc6 tLlc5 29,gc8! ( 1 )
White is better i n all lines.
29 ...\Was
Mter 29 . . . \Wxc8 30.liJe7t @f8 3 l . liJ xc8
liJ xb3, White emerges with an extra pawn
following 32.liJxd6 (or even 32.�xa6 �b2
33.tt:lxd6 ixa3 34.tt:lxe8 @xe8) 32 . . . �b2
33.tt:lxe8 @xe8 34.a4 and thus has excellent
winning chances.
30.gxe8t Wh7 3 l .gbb8 '!Wxa3 32.ie3
Two rooks and a bishop are too much for a
queen to handle.
4l .ga1 go 42J�k1 gc3
32 ... tiJd7 33,gb7 tLl e5 34.f4 tLlg4 35,gxf7
'!Wa2
It seems that White has good winning
chances, for example:
The capture 3 5 . . . tt:lxe3 invites 36. liJ f6t ci>h6
37.1"1.h8t �xh8 38.1"1.h7#.
43.We7
36.tiJf6t tLlxf6 37.gee7 tlJg4 38.gxg7t Wh8
39.id2 '!Wa1
Otherwise, [email protected] @d8 44.e6 ci>e8 45 .d5
g5 [email protected] and 43.d5 @d8 (43 ... g5 [email protected]!)
44.d6 are also promising.
43 ... gc7t 44. We8 gc3 45.d5 gc5 46.e6 We?
47.Wf8 gxd5 48,gxc2t Wd6 49.e7 gf5t
so. ci>es ges 5 I .gd2t We6 52.ci>ds Wf7
53.gf2t Wg7 54.e8='1W
Or 39 . . .\Wxd2 40.1"1.h7t ci>g8 4 l .ic4t ci>f8
42.ghf7t @g8 43.1"1.e8#.
4o.gh7t ci>gs 4I .geg7t ci>£8 42.gf7t 1-0
1 2-4 M. Kazhgaleyev - G. Flear
French League 200 1
And White wins.
(5 points)
64.ga3t! ( 1 )
1 2-2 G. Flear - J. Burnett
Torquay 1 982
( 3 points)
38 ... tLlxdS! ( 1 )
Black seizes the initiative.
39.tLlxd6t! ( 1 )
The best defence. Much worse are both
39.exd5 ? e4 and 39.cxd5 ? �xb5 40.1"1.xb5 1"1.xb5
4 1 .\Wc4? liJ c7.
39 ...'1Wxd6 40.cxd5 gxb2 4l .'!Wxb2 c4! ( 1 )
42.ie2
Not 42.�xc4?? WeS t .
42 ... tLl c7 1/2-1/2
Black could perhaps have tried for more with
42 . . . �e7!? 43. @fl \Wxa3 .
•
White has to be precise, for example 64.1"1.a 1
g4 65 .gg7 id3 66.1"1.xg4 fl =Wf 67.1"1.xfl �xfl
is only drawn.
64 ... Wf4 65J�f7t! ( 1 ) 65 ... £5 66,ga1! ( 1 )
The game finished with 66.1"1.xf5 t ? ci>xf5
Yz-Yz, as 67.1"1.f3t @e4 68.1"1.xf2 g4 offers no
winning chances.
66 ... g4 67,gd1! ( 1 ) 67 ... g3 68,gd5! ( 1 )
68 ... g2 69.gdxf5t We3
Other moves are no better, e.g. 69 . . . ci>e4
70.1"1.f4t @e5 7 1 .1"1.xf2 g l =\W 72.1"1.e7# or
69 . . . ci>g4 70.1"1.xf2 g 1 =Wf 7 1 .1"1.g7t.
70J3e5t Wd3 7l .gf3t
Mate in four.
�
\lol
" . · ··""' ltol
",, ...
Chess is not an Easy Game
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Glenn Flear
1 2-5 G. Flear - D. Leygue
Creon 200 1
(4 points)
26 . .!Llc3! ( 1 )
White brings the last piece into play and can
count on some advantage.
On the other hand, after 26.e8='Wt?! lt:l xe8
27.l'!xe8t l:!xe8 28 .ixe8 a6, it's not clear who
is better.
26 ... a6 27 . .!Lle4! ( I )
Trading o ff Black's knight.
Tactimania
The other tries are no better: 45 . . . g5 ? (too
weakening for Black's king) 46.fxg5 f4 is met
with 47.'Wg4; whilst after 45 . . . a3 (too slow)
46.lt:lxf5 'Wxg2t 47.'Wxg2 ixg2 48.lt:ld4 only
White can have serious winning aspirations.
46 . .!Llxc4 Wfe2 47.Wfxg2 Wfxc4 48.Wfxa8
Wfxf4t=
1 2-7 A. Antunes - G. Flear
Pau 1 98 8
(3 points)
2 l .g4! ( 1 )
27 ....!Llxe4 28Jhe4 .id4t
If 28 . . . axb5 29.e8 ='Wt l:!xe8 30.l'!xe8t
if8 , White wins by continuing with 3 1 .l:!a 1 !
( 1 ) 3 l . . .�g7 (or 3 l . . . f5 32.:1!aa8 l:!f6 33.d6)
32.:1!aa8 as the bishop is lost.
29J�dxd4! ( 1 ) 29 ... cxd4 30.e8=Wft �xeS
3 l .�xe8t @g? 32.ic4 b5 33.ia2 1-0
1 2-6 C. Carton - G. Flear
French League 2002
(4 points)
White has to react immediately.
2 l ..JUd8 22.gxf5 �d1 23.�xd1 �xd1
24.Wfa8t @f7 25.fxe6t @e? [email protected]! ( 1 )
26.'Wg8! ( 1 ) comes to the same thing, and is
also worth a point.
However, not 26. i>xd 1 ? in view of
26 . . . fl ='Wt 27.lt:le l if2 when Black is winning:
28 .'We4 'Wxe 1 t 29 .'\Wxe 1 ixe 1 30.�xe l i>xe6
3 1 . i>e2 �xe5 etc.
26 ... fl =Wf 27.Wfg8 �e1 t [email protected]! ( 1 ) 1-0
42.c6! ( 1 )
The initiative i s all important.
The game ended as follows: 42.cxd 5 ? ixd5
43.:1!xd7 (best would have been 43 .:1!b2 'We 1
with only a slight edge for Black) 43 . . . 'Wd2
44.'Wg3 'Wxg2t! 4 5 .'Wxg2 ixg2 46.\t>xg2 a3
47.lt:l xf5 a2 48.:gd 1 a 1 ='1W 49.:gxa 1 :gxa 1 50.c6
:ge l 5 I . lLl e7 g6 52.i>f3 �g7 5 3 . f5 g5 54.�e4
:gel t 0- 1 .
42 ... dxc4! ( 1 )
The weaker 42 . . . dxc6? even loses, e.g.
43 .'Wb2 :gg8 44.lt:l e8.
43.c7! ( 1 )
The complications are not at all clear, but
instead, following the inferior 43.cxd7?, the pawn
would be rapidly lost after 43 . . . :gd8 etc.
43 ...id5
If 43 . . . c3 , matters seem to be balanced:
44.:gb8 Wxc7 4 5 . :gxa8 c2 46.:gc8 c l ='W
47.'\Wxc l 'Wxd6=.
44.�b5 Wd2 45.Wfg3! ( 1 )
Otherwise, 4 5 . :gxd5 'Wxd5 46.c8='W :gxc8
47.lt:lxc8 'Wd2 favours Black.
45 ...ixg2
•
1 2-8 G. Flear - S. Garza Marco
Spanish League 2006
(4 points)
42.g6! ( 1 )
44J�h5!! (2)
42 ... hxg6
43.�6d5t
@c6
Two points for this excellent shot!
44 .. J3f2
The desperate counter 44 . . . :ggl t 4 5 .i>b2
:gg2t 46.�a3 ib 1 is met by 47.b4! ( 1 ) .
45.h7 � f8 46.h8=Wf �xh8 47.�xh8 1-0
Chess is not an Easy Game
1 2-9
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Glenn Flear
1 2-9 M. Aguettaz - G. Flear
French League 2009
( 5 points)
39 ...WI'xg3t!! (2)
Two points for this surprise! Black thus avoids
defeat and even has chances to be better.
After 39 . . . :!:%xg6? 40.fxg6 Wxg6 4 1 .hxg5 '1Wd6
42.:!:%ef2, White's pressure is too strong.
40.WI'xg3 ltlxg3 4I .l:%xe8 ltlxfl 42.ltle7! ( 1 )
42 ... ltle3t
Which square for the king?
43.<ii> h 1
Best seems t o b e 43.Wf2! ( 1 ) 43 . . . lt:J g4t
44.Wg3 l:%f7 4 5 .:!:%h8t Wg7 46.:!:%xh5 l:%xe7
47.:!:%xg5 t Wf6 48.:!:%xg4 Wxf5 with equality.
If 43.Wf3 liJ xf5 44. lt:J g8t Wg7 4 5 . lt:Jxf6
liJ xh4t 46.Wf2 't!?xf6 47.:!:%b8, the ending is
complicated, but I prefer Black, for example
after the further moves 47 . . . 4J f5 48.:!:%xb7
liJxd4 49.l:%a7 h4 50.:!:%xa5 g4 5 1 .l:%a8 ttJ f5 .
43 .. JH'7! ( I ) 44.f6
Or 44.4Jxc6 liJ xf5 4 5 . 4J d8 l:%d7 46.hxg5 t
Wxg5 with a black advantage.
Tactimania
18 ...�b4
The alternatives 1 8 . . . fxe6? 1 9 .:!:%xe6t ie7
20.ig5 and 1 8 . . . ie7 1 9 .'1Wc6t! Wf8 20.axb3
'.Wb4 are not comfortable for Black.
19.axb3! ( 1 ) 19 ... ixe1 20.'Wc6t! ( 1 ) 20 ... <it>f8
2 I .i.e3 WId6?
Hopeless.
Instead, 2 1 . . .'1We4? isn't playable either,
for example 22.ic5t 't!?g8 23.exf7t 't!?xf7
24.'1Wxc7t We8 25 .'1Wxg7.
The best chance is 2 1 . . .'1Wf6! ( 1 ) , e.g. 22.ic5t
Wg8 23.:!:%xe l fxe6 24.:!:%xe6 '!fif7 (24 . . . Wf4
2 5 . 4J e3 with plenty of play for White) 2 5 .l:%e7
'!fif6 26.'1Wxc7 l:%e8 27.l:%d7 if7 and Black can
perhaps hold out.
22.�c5 �b4 23.Ld6t �xd6 24.exf7 hS
25Jha6 hxg4 26.hxg4 b4 27.ltle3 ixf7
28J;as ges 29.ltlf5 .ih2t 30.<ii> g2 gxa8
3 1 .'1Wxa8t �e8 32.'1Wd8 1-0
1 2- 1 1 G. Flear - F. Libiszewski
Marseille 2005
(4 points)
20 ...ixh3!! (2)
44 gxh4
.•.
Better than 44 . . . g4?! 45 .:!:%h8t l:%h7= .
After 44 . . . gxh4, my opponent resigned
somewhat prematurely but, even so, analysis
demonstrates that Black is much better:
4 5 . ttJ xc6 (or 4 5 . ttJ g8t?! Wh7 46.:!:%xe3 Wxg8
47.l:%e8t Wh7 48. 't!? h2 Wg6 49.'t!?h3 l:%xf6-+)
45 ... bxc6 (also possible is 45 ... 4J g4 46.4Jd8
l:%xf6 47.l:%e6 l:%xe6 48.liJxe6 ttJ e3 etc.) 46.:!:%xe3
l:%xf6 47.Wg2 (or 47.l:%e5 l:%f4 48.:!:%e6t Wg5
49.:!:%xc6 l:%xd4 50.l:%c5 Wg4) 47 . . . :!:%f4 48.:!:%e6t
Wg5 49.:!:%xc6 l:%xd4 and Black should win .
Demolishing White's defences.
2 l .gxh3 �eS! ( 1 )
With multiple threats.
22.hl7t
If 22.�c3 , then following 22 . . . :!:%ac8 23.'!fif2
(or 23 .�xh7t Wh8 24.�xe5 (24.'!fif2 Wxf2t
2 5 .'t!?xf2 .ixc3 26 . .if5 .ixa l 27 . .ixc8 .id4t)
24 ... :!:%xc2 2 5 .ixc2 Wg5t etc.) 23 ... '\Wxflt
24. 't!? xf2 l:%xc3 White would have to accept a
long and unpleasant defence.
22 ... <it>h8 23.i.e4 i.xa1 24Jixa1 f5! ( 1 )
2S ..if3
1 2-10 A. Shirov - G. Flear
2S ...'!Wd4t 26.<it>g2 'Wxa1 27.'Wd3
British League 2005
(4 points)
18.e6! ( 1 )
A fine Zwischenzug.
The routine option, 1 8 .axb3 ?! �b4 1 9.�e3
'.Wd5 , isn't particularly dangerous, because after
20.'1Wxd5 l:%xd5 2 1 .:!:%ec l 0-0 22.:!:%xc7 a5, Black
has the bishop pair as compensation for the
pawn .
•
25 ..ixf5 loses to 25 . . . Wg3t 26.Wh l '.Wf3t.
Or 27 . .ic3 l:%ac8.
27 gf6 28.�h5 gds 29.�g5 '!Wxa2t 30.<ii> fl
'Wa1 t 3 I .<it>g2 'Wb2t 32.<it>fl gdd6 33.Lf6
'Wxf6 34.if3 'WeS 3S.'Wc4 bS 36.'Wc5 <ii> h7
37.h4 ge6 38.'Wfl 'Wa1 t 39.<it>g2 gg6t
4o.<ii> h3 Wc3 0-1
.••
Chess is not an Easy Game
••
1 2- 1 2
•
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•
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Glenn Flear
Tactimania
12-14 H. Hamdouchi - G. Flear
12- 1 2 G. Flear - J.P. Boudre
St Affr ique 2007
St Affrique 2009
(6 points)
(4 points)
37... .!Llxe4t!! (2)
40 �g2t!! (2)
The game finished with 37 . . . lt:l h 1 t ? 38.mg1
lt:l f4 39 .!%a8 l:%xg2t 40.mxh 1 lt:l xd5 4 1 .!%xe8
lt:l f4 42.lt:ld5 1 -0.
38.fxe4 .!Llf4! ( 1 )
O r similarly 3 8 . . . !%xg2t 39.mfl (39.mxg2?!
lt:l f4t 40.mf2 lt:l xd5 4 l . lLl xd5 �h5 seems
dangerous for White) 39 . . . lt:l f4, which also
merits one point ( 1 ) .
An astonishing move! I only had a couple
of minutes on the clock, so had to take a
calculated risk. Fortunately the variations hold
together for Black.
The only half-decent alternative would be
40 . . . l:%xg6!? 4 1 .�xg6 ig 1 t! 42 .�xg 1 (certainly
not [email protected] 1 ?? l:%g8) 42 . . . !%g8 43.�f2, with a
small advantage for White. If you suggested
this line instead of the game continuation, it's
worth a point.
4 l .�xg2 a:xg6t! ( 1 )
Incorrect is 4 1 . . .lt:lxf4t? 42.mf3 lt:l xg6
43.ig3, as White then has a big advantage.
..•
39J3a8 a:xg2t 40.�fl
Not 40.m e 1 l:%g1 t 4 l .md2?, because of
4 1 . . .!% d 1 t! ( 1 ) [email protected] 1 �h5 t .
40 .!Llxd5 4U�xe8 .!Ll e3t 42.�e1 lt:l c2t
43.�d1 .!Lle3t 44.�e1
.•.
With a repetition. Note that 44. me l ?
wouldn't be wise in view of 44 . . . !%g1 t 45 .md2
lt:l c4t.
1 2- 1 3 T. Ringoir - G. Flear
Chamalit:res 2008
(4 points)
1 5 ...J.g4!! (2)
The attack is worth a piece.
16.hxg4 hxg4 17.�g3
Or 1 7.�f4 i.d6! ( 1 ) 1 8 .�g5 ( 1 8 .�xd4 �h5
1 9. mfl lLl c6 with another powerful attack)
1 s . . . �h? 1 9 .f4 gxf3 2o.mf2 �h2 2 LlLl d2
fxg2 22.l:%g 1 i.f4 2 3 . lt:l f3 i.xg5 24.lt:l xh2 i.xc l
2 5 .l:%axc l l:%xh2.
17... .!Llf5 1 8.�e5
Otherwise, 1 8 .�c7 is refuted in style by
1 8 . . . �h5! ( 1 ) , for example 1 9 .�xc5t mg8
20.mf1 �h 1 t 2 1 .me2 l:%e8t 22.ie3 �xg2
23.md 1 lt:l xe3t 24. fxe3 �f3t 2 5 . @ c l l:%h l .
18 �h5 19.�fl .!Lle3t
..•
Prettier is 1 9 . . . i.d6 20.�xd5 �h i t 2 1 .me2
lt:l g3t with a forced mate.
20.a:xe3 dxe3 2 1 .�xh5 a:xhs 22 ..L:e3 d4
23 .if4 a:hlt 24.�e2 B:e8t 25.�d2 B:he1
26.J.e3 dxe3t 27.fxe3 B:8xe3 28.�c3 a:3e2
29.�c4 J.b4 0-1
•
•
42.�f3
Not 42.�xg6?? due to 42 . . . lt:lxf4t.
42 J.c6t! ( 1 ) 43. .!Ll e4 a:cg8 44.'Wxd6
..•
If 44.ig5 , Black has to continue with
44 . . . !%xg5! ( 1 ) (44 . . . hxg5 ? 45 .�xd6) 4 5 . fxg5
l:%xg5 46.'�xd6 !%g3 t = .
44 Elg3t! ( 1 ) 45.i.xg3 Elxg3t 46.�e2
•..
.!Llxf4t 47.�d2 a:g2t
Simplification with 47 . . . ie3t ? 48.mc3
ic5t 49.lt:lxg3 isn't possible due to White's
passed pawns.
48.�d1 a:g1t 49.�d2 B:g2t 50.�d1 IJl-1/2
Chess is not an Easy Game
1 2-1 6
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In my calculations at the time, I
couldn't work out how to react if
Black plays 23 �xh2. Can you?
•
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.••
I continued with 69.i>g3.
Black then has two tempting moves:
69 . . . 2'hd4 and 69 . . g5. Which is best?
.
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1 2- 1 5 G. Flear - J. Aagaard
12-17 G. Flear - G. Andruet
Athens 1 989
Great Yarmouth 2007
(4 points)
An analysis position from a game where
I was better, but unable to find a win at the
time, and even went on to lose.
After. . .
23 .. .\§'xh2
.. .I regret not having found the following . . .
24Jhg7!! (2) 2 4 !it>xg7 25.�h5!! (2)
• •
White dominates in all lines!
25 J��e5
.•
(3 points)
66.<it>g3 �xd4! ( 1 )
The best option.
The game ended with: 66 . . . g5 ? (after this
move, surviving becomes too complicated
a task for Black) 67. f5 g4 68.f4 !'i:c7 69 . lt:'l c6
(maybe 69.lt:'lxb5 is even better) 69 . . . !'i:a7 70.f6
!'i:a3 7 I .f7 !'i:xb3t n.<;i;>g2 !'i:b2t 73.Wfl !'i:b 1 t
74.We2 !'i:b2t 75 .We3 g3 76.f8 =W g2 77.Wg7
1 -0.
67.�e6
Or 25 . . . Wxh4 26J''hf7 t <;i;>g8 27.Wg7#.
26J:hf7t <it>gs 27.�xd8 �xhS 28J'hb7
White has an extra pawn and the better
pieces.
28 �e2 29 ..ih4 �fl t 30.<it>c2 �e2t
3 l .<it>c3
..•
And White wins.
Now Black has to sacrifice his rook, but
how?
A) 67 �xf4! ( 1 ) 68.<it>xf4 <it>h4! ( 1 )
.••
O r 6 8 . . . g5t, which also deserves a point ( 1 )
69.<it>f5 <it>h4 70.Wg6 g4 7 l .Wxh6 g3= .
69.<it>es hS
1 2- 1 6 G. Flear - 0. Komeev
Black now draws in all lines.
70.<it>f4
Spanish League 200 1
(4 points)
38 .. J:ge4! ( 1 ) 39.�c6?
I thought that I was winning when I played
this move!
The endgame option 39.!'i:xd8 !'i:xe6 40.<;i;>xf3
a5 favours Black.
The best chance would have been 39.Wxe4!
( 1 ) 39 . . . '\Wxc8 40.'1We7t Wg8 4 J .<;i;>xf3 Wc5 and
with Black's king so open, White would have
drawing chances.
39 .. J�e3!! (2)
I anticipated 39 . . . Wf6? 40.Wc7t (40.!'i:g8t
Wxg8 4 1 .Wxf6 ih5 = ) 4o . . .We7 4 1 .Wc3t Wf7
42.'1Wh8 with advantage to White.
40.�cl
Or 70.f4 Wg3 7 1 .�f7 h4 72 .ixg6 h3 73 .ie4
b3 74.f5 h2 7 5 . f6 b2 76.f7 h 1 =W 77.�xh 1
b 1 =W 78.f8 =W with equality.
70 ... g5t 7l .<it>f5 g4 n.<it>f4 b3 73.�xb3
<it>h3 74.�f7 <it>g2=
Otherwise, there is a second way, but I don't
trust this one:
B) 67 �d3t? 68.0 �xf3t
..•
Avoiding the mate threatened by 69 .ig4.
69.<it>xf3 gS
This time I think that White can win!
70.f5!
But not by 70.�f7t? Wh4 7 1 . f5 g4t 72.Wf4
g3 73 .id5 b3.
to
70... g4t 71 <it>f4 g3 72.<it>xg3 <it>xgS 73.<it>f3!
hS
40...�b7t 4l .�xe3 Lc8 42.�e5t <it>f7 0-1
Or 73 . . . b3 74.We4 b2 75 .ia2 Wf6 76. ib 1
h5 77.Wf4 and Black can do nothing.
Giving
40 . . . <;i;>f8 .
check
with
40.!'i:c7t
fails
74.<it>e4 h4 7S.<it>e5 h3 76.f6 h2 77 ..id5
b3 78.f7 b2 79.£8=� b 1 =� 80.�f6t <it>g4
8 l .�f3t
Mate is forced!
•
Chess is not an Easy Game
1 2-1 8
1 2-20
0
0
1 2- 1 9
0
•
Glenn Flear
1 2- 1 8 G. Flear - A. Summerscale
Tactimania
12-20 G. Flear - Z. Varga
Nice 1 997
French League 1 999
(3 points)
49.f4!! (2) 49 ... e4
Following the continuation 1 7 . . . ixc3
1 8 .gxf6 ixb2t 1 9 .�xb2 1M'xf6 20.tLlc3,
the piece is more of an asset than are three
unimpressive pawns.
1 8.he4 dxe4 19.c!iJxe4! ( 1 )
White eliminates an important central pawn.
If 49 .. .l�k3t , White has a choice, but the
best answer is not the obvious one:
19 ...W/xe4
A key point is that 1 9 . . . ixe 1 ? is refuted by
20. tLl f6t! ( 1 ) .
20.�xe4 �xe4 2 1 .hb4 c!iJd5 2 2..id2 �h4
23.�g3 b5 24.a3 �xh3
Black regains the pawn, but loses control of
the centre.
25.�xh3 hl3 26.e4 c!iJ b6 27.c!iJc3 a6 28.ie3
�e8 29.d5 c!iJd7 30.id4 tlJ e5 3 L.ixe5 �xeS
32.f4 �e8 33.�d2 icS 34.�e3 h6 35.gxh6
gxh6 36.d6 ib7 37.e5 �g7 38J::gg1 t �£8
39.c!iJe4 ixe4 40.�xe4 �c8 4 1 .£5 c3 42.bxc3
�xc3 43.e6 1-0
1 2- 1 9 E. Bacrot - G. Flear
French League 1 998
(3 points)
1 5.e6! ( 1 )
Destabilizing Black's defences.
1 5 ... fxe6 16.ixd5! ( 1 ) 16 ...W/xd5
The problem with 1 6 . . . exd5 is 1 7.axb5 axb5
1 8 .ixe7! ( 1 ) 1 8 ... �xa 1 1 9.ic5 t .
17.c!iJxe6 �f7 1 8.c!bxc7 �£5 19.c!iJxa8 �xa8
White is already winning.
20.axb5 axb5 2 l .ic5 �d8 22.�b1 W/xb 1
23.�exb 1 e5 24.ga6 c!iJxd4 25.cxd4 exd4
26.�xb5 d3 27J3d6 �xd6 28 ..ixd6 <i!ie6
29.if4 c3 30.<i!ifl id4 3 l .f3 ihs 32.ie3
ie5 33.f4 ihs 34.g4 �d6 35.gbs 1-0
•
( 5 points)
17.g5! ( 1 ) 17 ... c!be4
A) 50.\tJg2! ( 1 ) 50 . . . b 1 ='IMf (or 50 . . . :B:b3 5 l .:B:xb3
�xb3 52.h7 b 1 ='1Mf 53.h8='1Mf '1Mfe4t 54.�g 1
Wxf4 5 5 .'1Mfc8 and I believe that if White plays
correctly he should be able to draw) 5 1 .:B:xb 1
�xb 1 52.fxe5 :B:c6 5 3 . \tJf3 \tJc2 54. �f4 :B:xh6
5 5 .\tJxf5 �d3 56.e6= .
B) Instead the natural 50.\tJh4? loses, but only
because of a well-hidden reason: 5 1 . . . :B:b3
5 l .:B:c8t and now 5 1 . . .\tJd3! ( 1 ) 52.h7 b 1 =1M'
53.h8='1Mf 'IMfh l t 54.�g5 Wg2t 55.�xf5 We4t
(the reason for the choice of d3 for Black's king)
56.\tJg5 Wxf4t 57.�h5 'l&f5t etc.
50.<i!ih4 b l =W/ 5 l .�xb 1 <i!ixb 1 52.<i!ig5 �c2
If 5 2 . . . :B:f7 5 3 .�g6 :B:f8 54.\tJg7 :B:a8 5 5 .�g6!
( l ) (another important retreat, especially as
5 5 .h7 \tJc2 56.h8='1Mf is too slow, e.g. 56 . . . :B:xh8
57.\tJxh8 �d3 5 8 .�g7 \tJe2 59.�f6 �xf2
60.\tJxf5 e3) 5 5 . . . �c2 56.�xf5 �d3 57.h7!
:B:b8 58. �g6 �e2 59 . f5 \tJxf2 60 .f6 e3 6 1 . \tJg7
e2 62.f7 e l =1M' 63.f8='1Mft :B:xf8 64.�xf8 =
53.�xf5 �d3 54. �g6 �e2 55.£5 �xfl
56.f6 e3 57.f7 �c8 58.<i!ig7 e2 59.f8=�t
�x£8 60.<i!ixf8 e 1 =Wi 61 .h7
With a book draw.
How many points did you manage from the 78 available?
GM performa nce
IM performa nce
I nternational player
Tourna ment player
C l u b player
Apprentice
Begi n ner
60 points or more
5 0 to 59
40 to 49
30 to 39
20 to 29
1 0 to 1 9
9 or less
•
The Tactimania adventure is drawing to a close, but the show (of tactics) must go on! In future,
whatever your strength may be, if chess stays fun for you, then your tactical development won't
come to an abrupt halt at the end of this book.
I suggest, in order to make further progress, that you always treat chess with an inquisitive
attitude. Essentially, this means keeping your mind open to alternative ideas whilst regularly seeking
improvements in all phases of the game. If your instinct is thus switched on, then your ability to
find combinational solutions will be heightened, whether you are playing or only analysing.
Before getting to the last page, I hope that you are ready and willing for one final series of exercises.
These may seem to be relatively tough, but after your efforts in the preceding twelve chapters,
I hope that you are now well and truly pumped-up for this, the ultimate challenge!
I have again used an optional points-scoring system, so that you can, if desired, evaluate your
efforts and even compare them with others.
Here, each exercise will score either two or three points, and the maximum for the whole
chapter is 5 0.
G M perfo rma nce
I M performa nce
I nternational player
Tourna ment player
C l u b player
Apprentice
Beg i n ner
40 points or more
3 5 to 39
30 to 34
2 5 to 29
20 to 24
1 0 to 1 9
9 or less
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
Here is an example to get you in the mood for the Tactimania test!
G. Flear - S. Garza Marco
Spanish League 2006
8
In this example, I could ask the question:
How to continue with Black?
The reply could be as follows:
(2 points) This indicates the maximum
score for this particular exercise.
7
6
5
4
16 ...'1'Ng6! ( 1 )
3
2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
One point. The available points are often
associated with exclamation marks, but not
always .
This precise move shows that White's pieces
are badly tangled.
My opponent missed his chance and instead
played l 6 . . . 'it>e7?. However, after l 7. f3 :gaf8
(or l 7 . . . ct:lxh6 l 8 . ctJ e6 ctJ I7 l 9.ctJxc5 dxc5
20.d6t!) l 8 . fxg4 i.xg4 1 9. ctJ ge4 ctJ xe4
20.ctJxe4 '1Wf4 2 1 .'1Wxf4 :gxf4 22.:gg5 , it was
White who had won material, and after a
hard struggle, eventually the game.
Otherwise, the tempting combination
1 6 . . . ct:l xf2? 1 7.�xf2 t.g6t 1 8 .'it>gl ixh5
doesn't work, because of 1 9 .ixh 5 t with
check!
8
7
6
5
17.�xh7
4
(diagram)
3
2
•
17 ...'1'Nxh7! ( 1 )
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
If you saw this far, and intended this move
(in your calculations) then you would be able
to award yourself a second point.
Black has excellent winning chances .
•
The Tactin�ania Test
1 3- 1
•
0
1 3-4
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
What result and why?
1 3-2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How should Black continue?
•
1 3-5
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What result? Are you sure!?
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
Find the most convincing
continuation for White.
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Playing Black, I accepted a draw offer
at this point, but could have played
for more. How?
1 3-3
0
••
h
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
13-1 G. Flear - A. Webster
13-4 E. Gausel - G. Flear
Leicester 1 994
Gausdal 1 987
(2 points)
White has a forced mate.
39.ih6t! ( 1 ) 39 ... 'it>e8 40.V9c8t 'it> f7
4I .V9f8#! ( I )
Unfortunately, I didn't see the mate (in one!)
at the end and took the perpetual check!
( 3 points)
32 ... liJxe3! ( 1 )
Otherwise, 32 . . . 4:\ xd2 33.'!t!xd2 doesn't yield
very much.
33.'r9d3 tLlc2! ( 1 ) 34.tLlxe4 lLlxe1 35.l3xe1
dxe4 36.V9e3
If 36.l3xe4,
36 . . . \Wf5 ! ( 1 ) .
1 3-2 G. Flear - J. Levitt
Black
must
reply
with
36 ...\Wd5
London 1 982
(2 points)
It's a draw ( 1 ) ! However I was lucky, as at this
point I won on time!
61 .l3h8t 'it>g6 62.l3g8t 'it>h6 63.l3:xg1 1/z-lf2
Stalemate. One point ( 1 ) if you saw that White
has a skewer to win the queen, but not the game!
Black has consolidated the pawn advantage.
37.h4 f5 38.V9c3 l3d8 39.l3d1 'it>h7 40.V9b4
c5 41 .V9xa4 cxd4 42.V9b4 l3d7 43.l3c1 V9d6
0-1
13-5 S. Tiviakov - G. Flear
Isle of Man 200 1
1 3-3 J. Richardson - G. Flear
Lambeth 1 98 5
( 3 points)
30.l3f4! ( 1 )
I n the game, 30.'�'xc7? l3xf5 ! ( l ) 3 l .l3xf5
'!tie l t enabled Black to make a draw, i.e.
32. \iJg2 '!t/c2t 33.l3f2 '!t!e4 t 34. <;!;>h3 '!t!h7t
3 5 .\iJg4 '.Wg6t 36.<;!;>f3 1Wd3t 37.<;!;>g4 '!t/g6t
38 .\iJh3 '!t/h7t 39.<;!;>g2 '!t/e4t 4o.c;t>fl 1Wb 1 t
4 I .\iJg2 \We4t 42.c;t>fl \Wb l t V2-V2 .
30... 'it>g8 3 1 .'it>g2! ( 1 )
A fine quiet move that limits any potential
counterplay.
3 1 . .. l3xf5
Neither 3 1 . . . 4::\ aG 32.i.e6t \iJh8 33 .l3h4, nor
3 1 . . .l3f7 32.i.h7t, solve Black's problems.
32.l3xf5 V9d2t 33.l3� V9d3 34.h4
The strongest, preparing a handy shelter.
White's bind is very strong, for example:
34 ... tLla6 35.V9xb7 tLl b4 36.V9f7t 'it>h8
37.l3f5
And White wins .
•
(2 points)
Black would have had good winning chances
with . . .
47. . .a4! ( 1 ) 48.tLlxe5
If 48.bxa4, simply 48 . . . lt:lxc4 49 .i.f3 lt:lxa3 .
48 ... fx:e5t 49.'it>e3 axb3 50.'it>d2 'it>e7! ( 1 )
Black uses the b-pawn as a decoy, i n order to
gain time to penetrate with his king.
Instead, the alternative idea 50 . . . b5 5 l .cxb5
(or 5 I .\iJc3 bxc4) 5 l . . .c4 52.b6 wouldn't be
that clear.
5 1 . 'it>c3 'it>f6 52. 'it>xb3 'it>g5 53. 'it>c3 ig4
54.id3 if.3 55.'it>d2 c;t>g4 56.'it>e3 'it>xg3
White is faced with an uphill struggle.
The Tactimania Test
1 3-9
1 3-6
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
•
Can you find a method for Black
to win a second pawn?
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How should Black continue?
1 3-1 0
1 3-7
0
a
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Can you find the best defence?
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What is White's best move?
1 3-8
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What result and why?
•
I
I
L---- j
c__
The Tactimania Test
13-6 J. Miles - G. Flear
47 .. .'tWxe5 48.Wh6t 'it>e7 49.:gel
so.:gdl
Leicester 1 987
(2 points)
There are two distinct methods. It was
sufficient to find either plan in order to earn
two points.
:ge3
Temporizing whilst avoiding any annoying
checks.
so ...We6 S l .Whs Wb6 sz.gd4
And Black cannot profit from the virtual pin
along the a7-g 1 diagonal.
A) The first idea is to break-up the kingside
1 3-8 J. Tompa - G. Flear
with . . .f4 (2) :
ss ... li:) d3 s6.i.b6 f5 S7.i.d4
Copenhagen 1 983
Or 57.i.d8 f4 5 8 . gxf4 li:) xf4t 59.Wfl tt:l g6
and . . . lt:l xh4.
57 ...g6 58.ie3 f4 59.gxf4 li:)xf4t 60.'it>h2
tll e6 61 .J.fl li:)g7 62.J.el li:)f5
B) The second plan is t o h un t down the
(2 points)
36.li:)gSt! ( 1 ) 36 ... hxg5 37.tll f3 ! ( 1 )
My opponent didn't find this pretty win
and settled for a draw with 37.Wh 5 t ? ! Wg8
38.We8t .
37...J.xf3 38.Wh5t 'it>g8 39.ge8#
a-pawn (2 for the following) :
ss ... li:)c4 56.ib6 'it>f5
13-9 A. Herzog - G. Flear
In the game (time was running out} , I didn't
find either way: 56 . . . lt:J d6?! 57.ic7 lt:l e4 5 8 .Jib8
g5?! 59.hxg5 fXg5 60.ic7 lt:ld2 6 I .ib8 lt:l f3
62.Jic7 h4 63.gxh4 lt:l xh4t 64.Wf2 Y2-V2.
57.'it>f3 'it>e6 58.i.c7
Or 5 8 .We4 lt:l xb6 5 9 . axb6 Wd6, and the
outside passed pawn ensures a win.
58 ... 'it>d7 59.ib8 tll xaS
With a second pawn in the bag!
Berlin 1 983
(2 points}
36 :gel t! ( 1 )
..•
I blundered with 3 6. . .Wf6?? and lost after
37.:B:cc8 :B:e l t 3 8 .Wg2 We6 39.:1'i:e8 :B:e7
40.:B:xg8t Wh7 4 I .l'!h8t Wg7 42.l'!cg8t wf6
1 -0.
37.'it>g2 We2! ( 1 )
Mate i s forced.
1 3-7 G. Flear - H. Hamdouchi
13- 1 0 J. Speelman - G. Flear
Montpellier 2000
Torquay 2002
(2 points)
46J:he5! ( 1 )
I n the actual game, I lost the thread with
46.l'!d8t? , and was soon dispatched: 46 . . . We7
47.l'!xe5t (after 47.l'!d5 l'!xh5 48.l'!dxe5t Wle6!
the ending isn't tenable) 47 . . . Wlxe5 48 .l'!d7t
Wxd7 49.Wlxh3t We7 50.Wlh4 Wle3t 5 1 .Wh2
Wfg3t 5 2.Wfxg3 fXg3t 53.Wxg3 a5 0- 1 .
46...l'!g3t 47.'it>f2! ( 1 )
The right square.
The alternatives, 47.Wfl Wlxe5 48 .Wh6t
We7 49 .Wc6 l'!xg5 and 47.Wh2!? Wxe5 48.l'!d7
Wg7 49.l'!a7 :B:xg5 50.:1'i:a8t We7 5 1 .:1'i:a7t Wd6
52.Wfd 1 t :B:d5 53.:1'i:xa6t We5 54.Wla 1 t :B:d4
5 5 .We 1 t Wf5 , both seem too difficult for
White.
(2 points}
Here, the solution is to play the quiet move . . .
1 8.i.xe3! ( 1 )
My opponent was tempted by (the blunder!)
1 8 .i.xh6?? and after 1 8 . . . lt:l e8! ( 1 ) White drops
a piece for insufficient compensation: 1 9 .:B:c3
exd2 20.ixd2 Wd5 2 1 .:1'i:e l :B:c8 and I went on
to win.
1 8 ... 'it>h8!
White is restricted to a small advantage.
On the other hand, 1 8 . . . tt:l d 5 ? 1 9 .ixh6,
1 8 . . . Wxd3? 1 9.:1'i:xc7 and 1 8 . . . lt:l e8?! 1 9 .i.e2
are all inferior.
•
The Tactimania Test
1 3-1 3
1 3-1 1
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Black has to choose between
20 E:ad8 , 20 . . . lt:l d4 or 20 ig4.
How many of these are bad?
Which move is your preference?
. . .
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How to win?
. . .
1 3- 1 2
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Black has an extra pawn. Can you find
a convincing winning method?
•
Glenn Flear
1 3- 1 1 E. Bricard - G. Flear
1 3- 1 2 N. Sanchez - G. Flear
French League 2007
St Affr ique 2009
(3 points)
One of the three is bad, whereas the other two
are perfectly playable.
You needed to determine that . . .
20 J!ad8?
• .
.. .is an error.
A poor choice, that I made in the game.
Did you decide that the alternatives are
reasonable? :
A) 20 . . . ig4! ( 1 point, if you decided that this
was a decent move) 2 1 .!::\ d e 1 ixf3 22.Eixf3
(22.ixf3? ig5) 22 . . . ig5 23 .'1Wd 1 tt::l d4=
B) 20 . . . tt::l d4! (1 point, if you calculated
that this was also acceptable) 2 1 .!::\ d e 1 (after
2 1 .tt::l xd4 exd4 22.Eixe8t Elxe8, White cannot
go for 23 .ixb7? because of 23 . . . c6 24.ia6
'1Wg4, with a winning attack on the light
squares) 2 1 . . .tt::l xf3t 22.ixf3 ! ? (if 22J''l:xf3 ?
then 2 2 . . . i.g5 23 .'1Wc2 c6) 22 . . . ig5 and even
if White can obtain a pawn for the exchange,
it's still comfortable for Black.
(3 points)
53 g5! ( 1 )
••.
Black needs to get his majority going.
54.'i!?d5
It seems that 54.c;t>f5 leads to an analogous
variation: 54 . . . c;t>g7 5 5 .�e6 ( 5 5 .c;t>g4 �g6
56.c;t>f3 f5 is too passive, e.g. 57.c;t>e3 'tt> f6
5 8 .'tt> f3 'tt> e 5 59 .c;t>e3 g4 and Black wins easily)
5 5 . . . 'it>g6 56.c;t>d5 f5 57.�c6 g4 5 8 . c;t>xb6,
and as in the main line (except for the minor
difference that Black's king is on g6 rather
than h6) .
54 ... f5 55. 'i!?c6 g4 56. 'i!?xb6 f4! ( 1 )
The most incisive.
57.a5 f3 58.gxf3 g3! ( 1 )
I n order to promote with check.
59.a6 g2 60.a7 gl =Wft 6l .'i!?b7 '1Wb 1 t 0-1
1 3- 1 3 G. Flear - A. Rotstein
French League 1 999
(3 points)
58. 'i!?h2! ( 1 )
It's Zugzwang, and Black has to make a
concession.
Going back to the game continuation . . .
58 .. J3d2
2 l .b5!
If 5 8 . . . c;t>h7, White wins a second pawn after
59.E\f8 E\xd7 60.E\xf5 �g6 6 1 .Eie5 .
59.'i!?h3! ( 1 ) 59 J3d1 60.'i!?h4 'i!?f6
Or 60 . . . Eih 1 t 6 I .c;t>g5 .
6l .!if8t 'i!?g6 62.g4! ( 1 )
The key move, avoiding mate and creating
additional threats.
. . . and Black loses a pawn.
2 1 ...tt::l d4 22.!ilxd4 exd4 23Jhe8t lhe8
24.hb7
( 1 point if you saw this far)
24 .'1We6
•.
No good is 24 . . . '1Wf5 2 5 .!::\ e 1 Elxe 1 t 26.'\Wxe 1 ,
as then 26 . . . '1Wxd3? 27.'1We8t �h7 28 .ie4t
compounds Black's problems.
25.i.e4 'i!?hs 26.£4 g5 27.'\W£2
I had nothing for the pawn and was unable
to put up much resistance .
•
Tactimania
•.
62 J3xd7
.•
If 62 . . . hxg4, then naturally 63.d8='1W.
63.gxh5t 'i!?h6 64.!!f6t 'i!?h7 65.gxf5 Elg7
66.!!£4 !&e7 67.'i!?g5 'i!?g7 68.!3f5 l3e6 69.'i!?f4
'i!?h6 70.l3e5 l3f6t 7l .'i!?g3 1-0
The Tactimania Test
1 3- 1 4
•
•
1 3-1 s
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
How to draw with Black?
h
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What result and why?
•
Glenn Flear
13-14 J .P. Boudre - G. Flear
13- 1 5 D. Leygue - G. Flear
Creon 1 999
Creon 1 999
(3 points)
Black has to react actively, as his only hope
consists in creating some counter-chances.
43 ... h5! ( 1 )
The only move!
In the game, I lost without putting up any
resistance: 43 . . . �d5? 44.f4 gxf4 4 5 . gxf4 h5
46.h4 1 -0
(2 points)
Black wins, ( 1 ) as the queenside majority is
able to go all the way without requiring the
king's assistance ( 1 ) .
24 ... d5
White has a protected passed pawn, but this
is not enough to create any significant counter­
threats.
44.f4
25.g4
Not 44.h4?? because of 44 ... g4.
The other principal move is 44.�e4, when
Black has to reply with 44 ... me6! ( 1 ) (on the other
hand 44 ... g4? is too slow: 45.hxg4 hxg4 46.f4 gxf3
47.mxf3 me5 48.�e3 m5 49.md3 �g4 50.mc4
mxg3 5 1 .mxc5 �f4 52.mb5 me5 53.�xa5 md6
54.mb6 md7 5 5.�b7) and now there are two
tries:
A) 45.£3 c4 46.�d4 m5 47.mxc4 h4 48.gxh4
gxh4 49.mb5 �f4 50.mxas mg3 5 1 .f4 mxh3
52.5 mg3 53.f6 h3 54.f7 h2 5 5.f8=� h 1 =� with
a probable draw.
B) 45.f4 gxf4 46.�xf4 md5 47.g4 (or 47.me3
c4 48.md2 me4 49.�c3 m£3 50.g4 hxg4 5 1 .hxg4
�xg4 52.mxc4 �5 53.mb5 meG 54.�xa5 md7
5 5.mb6 mc8=) 47 ...hxg4 48.hxg4 �d4 49.g5 c4
50.m£3 md3 5 1 .g6 c3 52.g7 c2 53.g8=� c l =�
54.�d8t mc2 5 5.'�xa5 �d 1 t and Black should
be able to hold.
44... gxf4 45.gxf4 h4! ( 1 ) 46. �c4 We6
It's now possible to compete in the race, as
the h-pawn is sufficiently far advanced.
If 2 5 . m f2, Black can continue as in the
game, or throw in 25 . . . h 5 ! ? first of all.
Otherwise, if 2 5 .a4, then 25 . . . a5 26.mf2 b5
and wins.
47.Wxc5 Wf5 48.Wb5 Wxf4 49.Wxa5 Wg3
so.i>b4 i>xh3 5 1 .a5 Wg2 52.a6 h3 53.a7 h2
54.a8='1Wt Wg1
With a drawn endgame .
•
Tactimania
25 ... b5 26.Wf2 c5 27.We3 aS 28.h4
IfWhite attempts 28. �d3, Black nevertheless
continues with his plan, for example
28 . . . a4 29.me3 (neither 29.h4 b4 30.cxb4
cxb4 3 1 . mc2 d4 32.g5 hxg5 33.hxg5 a3 , nor
29 .a3 b4 30.cxb4 cxb4 3 1 .axb4 a3 32. mc3 d4 t
33. �b3 d3 help White's case very much either)
29 . . . a3 30.md2 b4 3 l .cxb4 cxb4 32.mc2 d4
33.�b3 d3 34.h4 d2 3 5 .�c2 b3t.
28 ... a4 29.g5 hxg5 30.hxg5 b4 3 1 .Wf4 b3
32.We5 b2 33.f6t gxf6t 34.gxf6t We8 0-1
The Tactimania Test
1 3- 1 6
•
1 3- 1 8
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What result and why? Are you sure?
1 3- 1 7
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
What result and why?
•
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
How to win?
•
Glenn Flear
1 3- 1 6 G. Flear - M. Pein
Tactimania
13-17 J .M. Degraeve - G. Flear
Brussels 1 986
Montpellier 1 996
(3 points)
(2 points)
Drawn, but only j ust!
69.gb6! ( 1 )
43.�d5t <i>h7 44.�e4t <i>gs 45.�d5t <i>hs
The game ended abruptly with 69.�c5 ? �h6
Yz-Yz, as winning chances had slipped through
White's hands, e.g. 70.!i:b5 �xa6t 7 I .<;t>b4
cj;lb8=.
69.. J!h5t 70. ci>b4! ( 1)
The rook is taboo. It's Jozsef Pinter who
demonstrated this winning technique.
The rest isn't that difficult . .
If 45 . . . �f7. White can force a draw with
46.Ei:d8t �f8 47.Ei:xf8t! ( 1 ) 47 . . . cj;lxf8
48 .1l*'d8t cj{g7 49 .�xe5t cj{gG 50 .'1Wg8t cj{fs
5 1 .1l*'xf7t=.
46.�xh6t! ( 1 )
The only chance.
46 ... ixh6 47.he5t ig7 48.hg7t <i>h7!
( 1 point if you saw this neat side-step!)
Now, White has to be careful, bur it seems
that he can still save the game.
My opponent instead continued with
48 . . . cj;lxg7?!, but that enabled an immediate
draw with 49 .'1Wxg5t cj{f7 50 .\Wfs t cj;le7
5 1 .1l*'e5t cj{f7 5 2.\Wf5 t cj;le7 5 3 .\We5t cj;ld7
54.Wd5t cj;le7 Yz-Yz.
.
70 ... ghs 71 .gc6
The threat of Ei:c8 obliges Black to go on the
defensive.
71 ...ci>b8
Or 71 . . . �h4t 72.�c4 �h6 73 .�c8 .
72. <i>b5 <i>a7 73.gc8
A key winning set-up (noting that White's
king could be elsewhere) .
49.�e4t <i>xg7
Now Black can try to 'dodge and weave'
with his king.
1 3- 1 8 A. Vandystadt - G. Flear
50.�e7t gf7 5 1 .�xg5t <i>h7 52.�h5t <i>gS
53.�g5t gg7 54J1*f d5t <i>£8 55.�d8t <i>f7
56.�d7t <i>f6 57.�d6t <i>g5 58.�e5t <i>h6
59.�f6t <i>h7 60.�f5t gg6 61 .�f7t <i>h6
62.�f4t <i>g7 63.�c7t <i>gs 64.�c8t <i>h7
65.�d7t <i>h6 66.�h3t <i>g5 67.�g4t ci>f6
68.�f4t <i>e6 69.�e4t <i>f7 70.�f5t gf6
71 .\Wd?t <i>g6 72.\Wg4t <i>h6 73.\Wh3t <i>g7
74.�g4t <i>h7 75.�d7t <i>gs 76.�c8t
(3 points)
White can achieve a draw with the following
combination (his best option, and 1 point, if
you deduced this) .
26.gxh7! ( 1 )
Opening up a path towards Black's king.
26 ... <i>xh7 27.�h4t <i>gs 2s.gh1 \Wd7! ( 1 )
The best defence, and one that I failed to
find over the board.
The game continued with 28 ... Ei:fl t?!
29.�xfl 1l*'e7 30.�h l '1Wg7 and White had an
extra pawn.
The rest is forced:
Black is getting nowhere, so it's drawn
after all!
St Affrique 1 996
29.\Whst <i>f7 30.\Wf6t <i>es 3 1 .ghs Wfe7
32.gxffl t Wfxffl 33.ia4t ltld7 34.Wfe6t Y!fe7
35.\WgSt Y!fffl 36.\We6t \We7=
•
The Tacrimania Test
•
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Find the continuation that demonstrates
how Black can draw.
0
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
Find the winning combination.
•
Glenn Flear
Tactimania
1 3- 1 9 G. Flear - D. Astasio Lopez
13-20 G. Flear - N. Eliet
Spanish League 2008
Guingamp 2008
(3 points)
Black has to be precise.
A) 5 1 . .. <i!zd3! ( 1 ) 52.lij d4 .ieS! ( 1 )
The alternative 5 2 . . . ia4? doesn't work
because of 5 3 .'tt> d 5! ( 1 ) with two threats, that
is supporting the e-pawn, and secondly to play
tt'l c6 to block the diagonal, e.g. 53 . . . ie8 54.e4
a4 5 5 .e5 a3 56.e6 ia4 (or 56 . . . a2 57.lt:J b3)
57.lt:Jc6!? (57.d7 a2 5 8 . d8='1W a 1 ='1W 5 9 . lt:J f5 is
also plausible) 57 . . .ixc6t 5 8 .'tt> xc6 a2 59.d7
a 1 ='IW 60.d8='1Wt 'tt> e 2 6 l .'Wd6 and the queen
ending seems to be winning.
53. <i!ze7 ia4
Now, White can no longer use his king to
defend the e-pawn.
54,lijb3 <i!zxe3 55.lijxa5 <i!zd4
Further progress isn't possible.
B) My opponent played . . .
5 1 ... a4?
. . . when his flag dropped. The chosen move
turns out to be losing, for example:
52.lij d4 .ieS
If 52 . . . a3 , then 5 3 . lt:J xb 5 a2 54.d7 a l ='IW
5 5 .d8=W 'tt> x b5 56.\Wd5t 'tt> b 6 57.\Wd4t and
wins.
Not however 57.ib l ? �b l 58.E!xb l , as
Black would no longer be in any danger: 58 ... a5
59.'tt>xe6 a4 60.g7t 'tt> g8 6 1 .f7t 'tt> xg7 62.E!gl t
'tt> h7 63.'tt> e7 a3 64.f8='1W E!xf8 65.'tt>xf8 h5
66.\t>f7 a2 67.Eig7t with a pretty draw.
57 ... <i!lgs ss.J.h7t! ( 1 ) ss ... <i!lxh7
More resistant than 58 . . . 'tt> f7 59 .g8=Wt
Elxg8 60.ixg8t 'tt> f8 6 l .ixe6 b l ='IW 62.E!g8#.
59.£7 ( I )
Having anticipated this continuation, my
opponent resigned. However he has a resource
that would have kept the game alive for a
while.
59 ... Eih5t 60.<i!zd6 Eib6t 61 .<i!ze7
My preference.
Otherwise, 6 l .'tt> c7 E!b7t 62.'tt> x b7 b l =Wt
63.E!xb l 'tt> xg7 64.E!fl 'tt> f8 6 5 .'tt> xa7 e5
66.'tt> b 6 ixf7 67.Eie l 'tt> e7 68.E!xe5 t 'tt> f6
69.E!c5 would be tough to win.
61. .. Eih7t 62.<i!zf6 13xf7t
The point of Black's defence, but White can
still win with precise play.
63.<i!zxf7 eSt 64.<i!lf8 J.gs
If 64 . . . h 5 , White plays 65 .E!b 1 all the same.
53.<i!ze7
65.Eih l a5 66J�xh2 a4 67.Eie2 a3 68.Eixe5
a2 69.Eiel h5
There are no squares for the bishop on the
a4-e8 diagonal.
Mter 69 . . . ic4 70.h5 ig8
Zugzwang.
53 ... <i!lcs 54.e4!?
70.Eifl
Bringing up the reserves!
54 ... a3
Or 54 . . . 'tt> xd4 5 5 .'tt> xe8 etc.
Now, there is more than one way.
55.tLlc2
Or 5 5 .lt:Jb3t 'tt> c4 56.lt:Jcl ib5 57.e5 'tt> c3
58.e6 'tt> b2 59.tLld3t ixd3 (59 ... \t>b l 60.tLlb4)
60.d7 a2 6 1 .d8='1W a l ='IW 62.\Wd4t 'tt> a2 63.Wxd3
with an endgame that must be winning.
55 ....ia4 56.tLlxa3 <i!zd4 57,lijb1 <i!zxe4
Otherwise White threatens tLl d2 .
58.lijc3t
And wins .
•
(3 points)
57.g7t! ( 1 )
7 l .Eig l
it's
I like this move which is better than 70 .E!g 1 ?!
ic4 7 l .'tt> e7 'tt> g 8 72.'tt> f6 'tt> h 7, when the
game would go on.
70 ...J.c4 71 .Eif7
Mate is forced.
The Tactimania Test
The last example in the book demonstrates how one can find some delightful variations by going
through one's own games. Whether this is done alone, with an opponent, some friends, and (why
not!) perhaps with at least the partial assistance of an analysis engine. In any case, keep analysing
in order to improve your game!
How many points did you manage in the Tactimania test?
The maximum score was 50 points:
GM performa nce
IM performa nce
I nternational player
Tourna ment player
C l u b player
Apprentice
Beg i n ner
40 points or more
35 to 39
30 to 34
25 to 29
20 to 24
1 0 to 1 9
9 or less
•
Index of the Flears' Opponents
For the exercises, the number refers to the page on which the solution appears.
A
Aagaard
Abramovic
Adorjan
Adrian
Ady
Aguettaz
Anderton
Andruet
Anic
Ansell
Antunes
Argandona Riveiro
Arkell
Astasio Lopez
Attie!
Audiffren
Ayral
Azmai parashvili
64, 236
22
22
210
74, 1 74
232
220
22, 76, 1 34, 236
1 38
78
230
1 28 , 208
38, 72, 1 40, 1 50
256
72
1 36
54
78
B
Bacrot
Baker
Barnes
Baron Rodriguez
Barsov
Bas man
Basora Pascual
Bauer
Becker
Bell
Bellon Lopez
Benito lmaz
Bernard
Berthelot
Beudaert
Bissieres
Blatny
Blum
Boleski
Bologan
238
82
1 84
1 70
1 68
76
2 5 , 96
121
62
1 08
1 92
54
1 8 , 1 66
1 54
202
48
1 96
18
1 68
1 18
Borchert
Bordi
Borne
Boudre
Boyne
Bricard
Britton
Bryson
Buckley
Burgess
Burnett
Buscara
c
Calvin
Campos Moreno
Capitanio
Carton
Cas a
Cernousek
Chabanon
Chandler
Chaplin
Chatalbashev
Chevaldonnet
Christiansen
Chuchelov
Coleman
Coil as
Collin
Condie
Conquest
Cooper
Coriat
Coste
Cullip
Curto
14
1 86
1 54
62, 66, 9 8 , 1 70, 234, 2 5 2
1 32
1 8 , 86, 2 5 0
94, 1 00, 1 5 8
22
2 5 , 36
14
226
5 8 , 96, 1 52
46
1 56
1 62
230
80
1 42
1 68
1 98 , 204
90
1 16
1 92
1 64
214
1 06
1 1 8 , 1 48
42
72
1 62 , 1 68 , 1 92
216
1 66
1 26
32
56
D
D'Amore
Danner
1 54
214
•
Glenn Flear
Degembe
Degraeve
Del Rio de Angeles
De Sousa
Devals
Devereaux
Dittmar
Dobrev
Domenech
Do mont
Donelly
Douven
Drasko
Duche
Dumitrache
Duncan
Dziuba
204
254
84
88
1 44
42
78
48
1 34
54
1 26
76
1 23
1 32
1 72
204
1 10
E
Edouard
Eliet
Emms
Epishin
Erdogdu
Erneste
88
256
46, 1 30
1 99
1 82
24
F
Fedorowicz
Fierro Baquero
Foisor
Forimos
Formanek
Fortea
Franca
Fruteau
Ftacnik
216
30
1 96, 208
14
1 82
1 08
64
46
82
G
Gachon
Gallagher
Gallo
Garcia Palermo
Garza Marco
Gause!
Gelis
Genov
Gervais
•
1 10
50, 1 64, 202
1 72
101
230, 242
244
1 6, 1 1 8 , 1 54
11
32
Tactimania
Geveke
Giffard
Gilbert
Gislason
Godena
Goerens
Goldgewicht
Gonzalez Menendez
Goodger
Gouret
Grassi
Greet
Griffin
Grignon
Grim berg
Grischuk
Grollemund
Grooten
Gurevich
Gutierrez Castillo
Gutman
Guyot
202
1 1 6, 1 82
1 36
1 34
1 46
70
36
1 42
92
24
32
66
1 26
216
74
1 96
92
30
36
1 12
218
1 16
H
Hadamard
Haik
Hamdouchi
Happel
Harakis
Harikrishna
Harley
Hebden
Hector
Henneteau
Hennigan
Herzog
Heymann
H ick!
Hirsch
Hjartarson
Hjorth
Hmadi
Hobuss
Hoffman
Hofmann
Holland
70
1 66
92, 1 48 , 1 86, 234, 247
208
1 34
1 26
1 92
74, 1 88
82
1 70
1 2 1 , 1 94
247
78
218
67
212
44
1 18
1 62
1 38
42
1 84
Index of the Flears' Opponents
Hort
H rivnak
Huerga Leache
Hutchinson
27
1 30
34, 2 1 6
1 04
I
Illescas Cordoba
lruzubieta
Iten
Ivanov
J
Jackson
Jacobs
Johansson
Jost
Jurkovic
223
1 46
214
34
1 20, 1 52, 2 1 6
56, 78
1 34
1 12
14
K
Kaiser
Kaposztas
Karjakin
Kasimdzhanov
Kazhgaleyev
Kieser
Kievelitz
Kindermann
Kinsman
Kirszenberg
Koch
Kojder
Korchnoi
Korneev
Kosten
Kouatly
Kourkanakis
Kourtesis
Krahenbuhl
Krnic
Kuende Gorostidi
Kuij f
Kunas
Kwiatkowski
212
80
1 90
16
1 08, 226
30
1 82
212
1 64
60
84
1 23
1 74
236
84
80, 1 24
18
34
1 14
1 94
1 72
1 04
38
1 10
L
Lad au
Lalic
Langeweg
1 1 0, 1 36
90
1 66
Large
Larsen
Laurier
Lawton
Leski
Levitt
Leygue
Libiszewski
Lomineishvili
Lyell
70, 220
1 78
1 96
1 04
1 42
1 38 , 244
22, 230, 25 2
5 8 , 232
226
1 56
M
Mad I
Malakhatko
Mallet
Manouck
Marciano
Marcille
Marholev
Marti dis
Martin Alvarez
Mas
Maupin
McDonald
McSheehy
Merle
Mestel
Meynard
Miles
Milesi
Milliet
Milosevic
Miralles
Mirzoev
Monroy
Morris
Morrison
Moskalenko
Motwani
Mourer
Mourgues
Muir
Miischenich
60
88
14
22
25
1 59
1 08
220
1 88
1 80
1 08
34
80
86
214
1 44
247
204
1 52
1 16
54
34, 1 90
206
94
1 14
1 44
76
72
1 06, 1 80
1 46, 1 90
72
N
Nabavi
Nataf
20
1 50
•
Glenn Flear
•
Navarrete
Neiman
Nemer
Nezar
Nielsen
Ni Hua
Nogueiras
Norgaard
Norwood
Nunn
86
20
1 32
1 12
84
94
72
44
70
1 20
0
O'Hara
Orlov
1 94
208
p
Palliser
Pandavos
Parker
Parmentier
Pasquier
Payre
Pearce
Pech
Pein
Peist
Pert
Petrossian
Petursson
Pfeifer
Ph am
Piankov
Piat
Pieterse
Pigusov
Pilotelle
Pinter
Pira
Plachetka
Placines
Plaskett
Podzielny
Polaczek
Polugaevsky
Porte
Prathemesh
Prats Rodriguez
90
18
1 50
1 46
1 52
58
1 48
1 06
254
1 06
206
1 88
20
62
1 40
1 86
1 12
1 80
1 50
70
82
1 72
20
52
1 90
40
44
98
1 04
1 70
1 74
42, 82, 1 06,
1 28 , 1 94,
88,
1 1 4,
1 00, 1 1 0, 1 20,
Tactimania
Preis mann
Prie
Purgimon
1 04
32, 54, 96, 2 1 4
1 36
R
Rabineau
Radnoti
Radziewicz
Rausis
Ravi
Ravikumar
Rawlinson
Rayya
Rechlis
Rendle
Rey Ardid
Ricci
Richardson
Riff
Ringoir
Robertson
Rooney
Roos
Rotstein
Rouchouse
Ruiz Gomez
s
Sadler
Samara
Sanchez
Sandu
Santo-Roman
Sanz Alonso
Sauvadet
Schlander
Schmitt
Sellos
Seppeur
Sharif
Sharp
Shelev
Shirov
Short
Shulz
Shvidler
Slapak
80
1 28
56
208
50
76
24
1 08
44
50
92
1 86
244
84
234
76
50
28
250
52
64
1 28
30
250
218
30, 92
212
1 88
94, 1 30, 1 32
20
74, 1 2 1 , 1 80
28
1 62
202
1 48
232
1 64
62
44
14
Index of the Flears' Opponents
Smagin
Smart
Smetankin
Solodovnichenko
Sonntag
Sayer
Speelman
Spraggett
Stefan ova
Stork
Stubbe
Sugden
Sulava
Summerscale
Surtees
Svetushkin
Swindells
Sydor
Szitas
1 12
1 30
42
206, 208
1 88
30
247
98
67
1 10
38
27
96, 1 68
238
20
1 74
16
90
200
T
Tabut
Taddei
Tan
Tangborn
Tan guy
Taylor
Teeuwen
Terrieux
Teychene
Thynne
Tiviakov
Tocchioni
Todorcevic
Tampa
Touzane
Tozer
Tregubov
u
Upton
v
Vaganian
Vaisser
Vajda
Vallet
1 14
206
48
36
18
1 18
48
11
74
16
244
1 26
1 58
247
1 04
82, 1 34
1 6, 1 1 6, 208
Vallin
Vanderbeeken
Vandystadt
Van Heirzeele
Van Mil
Van Wely
Varga
Vaugeois
Velimirovic
Vernay
Vi ret
Volkov
w
Walden
Walker
Wall
Ward
Watson
Webster
Weill
Wells
Wessendorf
Westphal
Wheeler
Williams
Will moth
Wolfgang
y
Yeo
z
Zeidler
Zschiedrich
1 90
16
254
34
32
90, 202
238
1 26
70, 74
48
1 06
1 66
36, 1 44
38
54, 96
1 1 6, 1 42
226
244
1 92
204, 2 1 2
1 68
210
46
58
1 62
1 86
56
1 77
1 76
32
40
62
218
86
•
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