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solucionario social science 5 sm

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teacher’s book
social science
5
primary
contents
The LOMCE and the Teaching programmes................................................................................................................. 4
The Teacher’s Book ............................................................................................................................................................. 6
The Pupil’s Book ................................................................................................................................................................ 10
The Pupil’s Book contents ............................................................................................................................................... 14
Unit 1. Earth and the universe......................................................................................................................................... 18
Unit 2. Relief and climate.................................................................................................................................................. 32
Term 1 ................................................................................................................................................................................... 48
Unit 3. Population............................................................................................................................................................... 50
Unit 4. The economy and its sectors.............................................................................................................................. 62
Unit 5. Money and business............................................................................................................................................. 76
Term 2 ................................................................................................................................................................................... 88
Unit 6. The Middle Ages.................................................................................................................................................... 90
Unit 7. The Modern Age.................................................................................................................................................. 106
Term 3 ................................................................................................................................................................................. 120
Workbook .......................................................................................................................................................................... 123
Project presentation
3
The LOMCE and the Teaching
programmes
Introduction
The LOMCE, Spain’s Organic Law to Improve Educational Quality (12/2013), is a significant
change from the previous law (the LOE), specially regarding unit scheduling. Specifically, it adds
new learning standards and outcomes, and revises others, such as the list of basic competences.
Unchanged elements
Aims. The LOMCE creates a series of general aims for educational stages which articulate the
entire curriculum taught across all subjects and grade levels. Therefore, the level of specific
detail included in the general aims by area will disappear. The specific aims of each unit must be
directly tied to the general curriculum. These new aims cannot be modified by the regional
governments.
Contents. The new law treats subject areas differently:
►► For core subjects, it offers a detailed breakdown of contents. However, it does not provide the
sequencing of these contents by school year; rather, the regional governments will determine
the distribution throughout a given educational stage.
►► For complementary subjects, the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports has not dictated
any specific course contents, leaving this to the discretion of the various regional governments.
Such administrations will be in charge of meeting the particular educational needs of each
region, while complying with the general goals and the expectations of skills and knowledge
acquisition at each stage.
Assessment criteria. Assessment criteria are central to the learning and assessment
processes.
In contrast to previous educational laws, the new law organises assessment criteria into content
blocks. While there is not an exact match between contents and criteria, there is now a clear
relationship between the two.This is specially important for complementary subjects, since the
list of contents provided by regional governments must demonstrate a link to assessment
criteria, and such governments will be dictating for the most part how such material is taught.
Basic competences. Standardization of the European educational system has led to the
general acceptance of a set of basic competences, these being understood as a set of skills
applicable to different contexts. This has been the greatest change in education over recent
years. Under the new law, basic competences must be developed and assessed, but through
learning standards, linking the two from the very beginning. The LOMCE defines seven key
competences:
1. Linguistic communication.
2. Mathematical competence and basic competence in Science and Technology.
3. Digital competence.
4. Competence in learning to learn.
5. Social and civic competence.
6. Sense of initiative and entrepreneurial spirit.
7. Cultural awareness and expression.
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Project presentation
Main new aspects
Learning standards. This is the newest aspect of the new curriculum. The LOMCE defines
these as what a pupil should know or can do within a given subject area and grade level.
These are precise descriptions of knowledge, skills, competences and other capacities that
the school must promote. Learning standards are set by law, both in core subjects, as well as
in complementary subjects and they are the basis for assessment. They also serve as a guide
for schools and as a frame of reference for their work. As a result, there is a clear connection
between learning standards and assessment criteria.
Learning outcomes. These are descriptors for learning standards, quantitative or qualitative
expressions that reflect how well standards and assessment criteria are being met. Teachers must
decide which achievement indicators are used to judge the degree of pupil success.
New teaching programmes
With these changes, the new course material for classrooms, and what we provide throughout
the Savia Project, must include the following:
►► Presentation. Connecting the unit to the overall curriculum, detailing how it fits into the
acquisition of content and the evaluation criteria.
►► Aims. Specific learning aims are created for each unit, tied to the general aims by the
educational stages included in the law.
►► Competences. Educators must specify the basic competences that will be worked, evaluated
and recorded, relating them to the learning standards.
►► Contents. The contents of each unit will be detailed and sequenced, drawing from the
materials offered by regional governments. These governments are in charge of their
distribution and depth.
►► Assessment criteria. These must match the criteria set by the regional governments for the
content block included in the unit.
►► Learning standards. A number of learning standards will be selected from those the regional
government has tied to assessment criteria. Although these are not a list of minimums, such
standards must guide the learning process.
►► Learning outcomes. For each learning standard, the teacher will fix a number of achievement
indicators or learning outcomes which must be observed, recorded and assessed throughout
the unit.
►► Methodological suggestions. The methodology is explained in order to guide the teaching and
learning process throughout the unit. The idea is to predict the materials needed, the possible
difficulties and the timing of activities as much as possible.
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5
The Teacher’s Book
The Teacher’s Book associates all the resources from the project to the Pupils’ Book. This allows
to enrich the classroom and adapt it to the educational itineray chosen by each teacher.
The general structure of the Teacher’s Book is the following:
►► Initial pages: They show how to use this book and how the units are structured in the Pupil’s
Book.
►► Unit guide: Includes a visual map of all the resources, the teaching programme, the
methodological suggestions and the teaching notes section by section.
Structure of each didactic unit
General introduction
It shows the contents to be developed and refers to the value taught throughout the unit. It
includes the recommended readings and the suplementary material associated (workbooks,
dictionaries, World Finders, etc.).
Unit resources map
It links each section of the unit with all the resources developed.
Indicates digital
resources for both
the teacher and the
pupil.
Differenciates
between teacher’s
resources and
classroom resources.
Shows the typology
of the activity and
the title of each
resource.
Gives detail for
teachers to find the
resource easily.
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Project presentation
Teaching programme
It is divided into two charts which give a clear and organised view of the new curricular
contents, taking into account the difficulty of adapting to the new LOMCE terminology.
The first chart
links the unit
aims and the
competences.
The second chart
links the contents
with the assessment
criteria, the learning
standards (new
curricular level in
LOMCE)
and the learning
outcomes. Thus,
each learning
standard is linked to
the activities of the
Pupil’s Book.
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Methodological suggestions
They include the general didactic and pedagogical suggestions for the development of the unit.
►► 1. Previous knowledge from previous years or units that pupils should have.
►► 2. Possible areas of difficulty pupils and teachers may face in the unit: frequent mistakes, more
difficult contents, general behaviour guidelines, etc.
►► 3. Innovation programmes with information about the structures of Cooperative Learning, the
programme of Education in Values and Learning to Think strategies developed along the unit and
its location in the project.
►► 4. Suggested distribution of sessions to recommend the teacher how to organise the work.
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Project presentation
Multiple intelligences
The Savia project offers a varied tipology of activities in order to
attend to the different learning styles pupils build up.
The multiple intelligences map from the Teacher’s Book shows
how each one of the multiple intelligences is developed
throughout the unit, not only in the Pupil’s Book but also in the
teaching notes.
Audioscript / Answer key
Each double spread includes the audioscript of all the Pupil’s Book activities as well as the
answer keys.
Includes the
Audioscript
to guide
listening
activites.
Includes the
answer key
to help teacher’s
correction.
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9
The Pupil’s Book
The book for Social Science 5 by
Savia is made up of six units based
on the CLIL methodology.
Every unit includes the following sections:
Introductory page
A warm-up picture for
introducing the main topics of
the unit.
Questions
for activating
knowledge and
develop speaking
skills.
An introduction to the
Final Task developed
throughout the unit.
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Content pages
Fun fact! and Who was? with
interesting topics, facts and
personalities related to the unit.
Activities
following the CLIL
methodology.
References to the
Workbook.
References to the Class CD
tracks.
References to mark there is an interactive
activity for the pupil to practise the
contents at www.saviadigital.com.
Review
Mind maps to organise the
contents.
Activities to go over the
main contents in the unit.
Interactive self-evaluation
for the pupil at
www.saviadigital.com.
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Skills
A workshop to put content into
practise and develop writing and
speaking skills.
Texts and activities
to develop skills and
prepare for external
exams.
Final task
The final task deals with
discovered contents and values
developed throughout the unit.
Every unit includes a section that
focuses on values.
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Project presentation
Magazine
Questions about the topics to check
comprehension, review contents and
develop speaking skills.
Interesting topics
and facts.
Check what you have learnt
Activities to review the main contents at the end of each term.discovered
contents and values developed throughout the unit.
Project presentation
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Contents
The world around us
Earth and
the universe
1
7
Relief and climate
2
25
Contents
1. The universe 8
2. The solar system 10
3. Earth’s movements 12
4. Around Earth
14
5. On Earth16
6. Earth’s visual representations 18
1. Weather
2. Climate
3. Earth’s climate zones
4. Spain’s climates zones
5. Spain’s rivers
6. Spain’s relief
5. Climate change TERM 1 - Magazine / Review
Population
Life in society
3
4
5
49
The economy
and its sectors
61
Money
and business
77
45
1. Population growth
2. Population density
3. Changes in Spain’s population 50
52
54
1. The economic system 2. The economic sectors 3. The primary sector 4. The secondary and tertiary sectors 5. People in an economy 62
64
66
68
70
1. Money 2. Market 3. Business 4. Consumers 78
80
82
84
TERM 2 - Magazine / Review The traces of time
The Middle
Ages
6
95
The Modern
Age
7
115
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
1. The Middle Ages 2. Visigoths in the Iberian Peninsula
3. Al-Andalus 4. The Reconquista in the Iberian Peninsula
5. The Christian Kingdoms in the Iberian Peninsula 6. Feudalism in the Iberian Peninsula 7. Art and culture in the Middle Ages 91
96
98
100
102
104
106
108
1. From the Middle Ages to the Modern Age
116
2. The Catholic Monarchs 118
3. The discovery of the Americas
120
th
4. The Great Spanish Empire in the 16 century 122
5. Economic crisis in the 17th century
124
th
6. Spain’s Monarchy in the 18 century
126
TERM 3 - Magazine / Review
133
Glossary
137
Final sections
Review
Skills
Final task: Find out how a solar eclipse occurs
20
22
24
Review
Skills
Final task: Find out what vegetation grows in
your region and how it adapts to its climate
40
42
Review
Skills
Final task: Find out how the population in the world is
56
58
60
Review
Skills
Final task: Find out about the process of making a product
72
74
76
Review
Skills
Final task: Find out the steps for starting a business
86
88
90
44
Review
Skills
Final task: Find out who El Cid was and learn about the
medieval society
110
112
Review
Skills
Final task: Find out the genealogy of the Spanish Kings
and learn about some of the most powerful dynasties
in Europe’s history
128
130
114
132
1
Earth and the universe
The objective of the first unit is to have pupils comprehend the
concept of space immediately surrounding them. The universe, the
Sun, and the solar system will be reviewed before presenting the
features of planet Earth.
First, the movements of Earth, such as rotation and orbit, are
explained. This includes the effects these movements have on the
planet.
Next, the content related to the Moon is introduced. Its
characteristics and movements, and how they are observed from
Earth will be explored. The atmosphere is shown as the gaseous
layer that covers our planet and allows the existence of life.
The following approach to teaching about planet Earth introduces
the concept of the geosphere and the hydrosphere, detailing the
layers that make up Earth and the location of the water on the
planet and its various states.
The last section of the unit is dedicated to the representation of
Earth and orientation in space.
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Unit 1
Complementary material
►► Social Science 5 Workbook. Unit 1
Unit resources
Digital resources
Teacher’s Resources on USB
and at www.smconectados.es
Pupil’s Resources on CD and
at www.smsaviadigital.com
Diagnostic activity.
The universe
Tune up What do
you know about ...?
Presentation. Galileo
Other materials
Let’s understand.
Colourful stars
Let’s practise. Stars
and Mars
Who was? Penzias
and Wilson
Teacher’s materials
Unit 1.
Earth and the universe
1. The universe
2. The solar system
Let’s play and learn.
Planets
Fun fact. Dwarf
planets
Animation. Layers of
the geosphere
Web link. Plate
tectonics
Let’s understand.
Earth’s revolution
Let’s understand.
Moon phases
Let’s practise. Lunar
phase simulator
Let’s understand.
Orbits
Let’s understand.
The atmosphere
Presentation.
Mind map
WB page 4
Reinforcement. Worksheet 1
Poster. The solar system and Earth
Reinforcement. Worksheet 2
WB page 6
4. Around Earth
5. On Earth
WB page 7
Reinforcement. Worksheet 2
WB page 8
Let’s understand.
The water cycle
Activity. Parallels
and meridians
Initial assessment
WB page 5
3. Earth’s movements
Video. Phases of the
Moon
Presentation. Man on
the Moon
Animation. The
atmosphere
Pupil’s materials
6. Earth’s visual representations
Who was…?
Eratosthenes
Let’s understand.
Scales
Reinforcement. Worksheet 3
Extension. Worksheet 1
Game. Maps
Poster. Geographic coordinates
WB page 9
Review
Test yourself. Selfevaluation
Review unit 1
Assessment unit 1
Skills
Video. Eclipses
Assessment. Rubric
Let’s understand.
Eclipses
Test yourself. Check
the way you have
learnt
Final task
Unit 1
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Teaching programme
UNIT AIMS
COMPETENCES
1. Learn about the features of the universe and solar system.
2. Understand the characteristics of planet Earth.
3. Explain Earth’s dynamics and their effects.
4. Use the maps in the unit correctly to complete orientation exercises, calculate
time zones and scale, etc.
5 Apply mathematical knowledge to performing different calculations related to
the unit content (scale, time zones, coordinates, etc.).
6. Complete group assignments on the unit content.
7. Share ideas and opinions with the group, demonstrating a respectful attitude.
8. Define concepts related to the unit. Develop specific aspects of the unit work
individually and in groups.
Social and civic competence
(Aims 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
Mathematical competence and basic competence in science and technology
(Aim 5)
Linguistic communication
(Aims 8, 9)
Learning to learn competence
(Aim 7)
Digital competence
(Aim 10)
9. Properly handle the unit vocabulary to describe the main concepts and
events included in it.
10. Use new technologies to work on unit content.
20
contents
assesSment criteria
learning standards
Gathering information on the subject
using different sources.
1. Obtain specific, significant
information about previously defined
events and phenomena, using
different sources.
1.1. Find, select and organise specific,
significant information. Analyse it,
reach conclusions, reflect on the
process and communicate orally or
in writing.
(Learning to learn competence)
• Complete activities using sources of
information such as images.
All of the activities
Using information and
communications technology (ICT) to
search for and select information.
Presenting conclusions.
2. With guidance, use ICT to obtain
information and learn to express
content.
2.1. Use ICT to complete assignments
using terminology appropriate to
the subjects.
(Digital competence)
• Use ICT as a tool for learning and
self-assessment.
Interactive activities on
Saviadigital, pages 8, 9, 11, 13,
14, 16, and 18.
Developing strategies to organise,
memorise and retrieve information
obtained using different methods and
sources.
3. Learn and use strategies for
developing responsibility, the ability
to work hard and perseverance with
regard to schoolwork.
3.1. Apply strategies for developing
responsibility, the ability to work
hard and perseverance with regard
to schoolwork.
(Learning to learn competence)
(Digital competence)
• Engage in self-assessment and learn
the relationship between effort and
results.
Activities: pages 20, 21, 22 and
24
Using and reading different textual
and graphic languages, with guidance
and simple models.
4. Explain what the universe is, the
origins of the universe and its main
components.
4.1. Explain what the universe is, the
origins of the universe and its
main components.
(Mathematical competence and
basic competence in science and
technology)
• Identify the components of the
universe.
Activities: pages 8 and 9
Unit 1
learning outcomes
• Understand what a light year is.
Activities: page 9
Teaching programme
contents
The universe and solar system:
Earth.
The universe.
The solar system: the Sun and the
planets.
assesSment criteria
The Moon: Characteristics.
Movement. Phases.
The cardinal points. The compass.
Identifying the poles, Earth’s axis
and the hemispheres.
Maps and scale: graphic scale and
numeric scale.
Parallels and meridians.
Geographic coordinates.
learning outcomes
5. Describe the main
characteristics of the solar
system. Identify different
types of celestial bodies and
their characteristics.
5.1. Define the terms galaxy, star, planet, satellite,
asteroid, eclipse and comet.
5.2. Describe and interpret diagrams of the solar
system and its components.
(Linguistic communication)
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Correctly define some of the
elements that make up the solar
system.
Activities: pages 10 and 11
6. Locate planet Earth in the
solar system. Explain the
change from geocentrism to
heliocentrism. Recognise
scientific advances in our
knowledge of the universe
and Earth.
6.1. Identify the Sun as the centre of the solar
system and locate the planets according to their
proximity to the Sun.
6.2. Describe the location of Earth in the universe.
6.3. Identify, name and describe the different layers
of Earth and their features.
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
(Linguistic communication)
• Put the planets in the solar system
in the correct order.
Activities: page 10
7. Explain Earth’s movements
and their effects. Associate
the seasons of the year with
these movements and the tilt
of Earth.
7.1. Describe Earth’s revolution and its axis.
Associate the seasons with the effects of the
revolution.
(Linguistic communication)
• Explain Earth’s revolution.
• Understand how it affects life on
Earth.
Activities: page 13
8. Describe the sequence of day
and night as an effect of the
Earth’s rotation.
8.1. Explain day and night as the result of Earth’s
rotation and as units for measuring time.
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
• Describe Earth’s rotation.
• View it as responsible for the
succession of days and nights.
Activities: page 12
9. Explain the characteristics of
the Moon and its movements.
Identify the phases of the
Moon.
9.1. Define the orbit of the Moon. Identify and name
the lunar phases.
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
• Distinguish between the phases of
the Moon.
Activities: page 14
10. Recognise scientific
advances in the study of the
universe.
10.1. Appreciate the importance of human curiosity
and scientific advances regarding the universe.
• Understand how space travel has
contributed to human knowledge.
Activities: page 24
11. Identify and recognise the
cardinal points. Associate
east and west with the
corresponding positions of
the Sun in the sky. Locate
north and south.
11.1. Locate the cardinal points, poles, equator,
northern and southern hemispheres and
Earth’s axis of rotation on globes and
planispheres.
(Social and civic competence)
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
• Recognise the main parallels and
meridians on Earth.
• Know how to deduce the
geographic location of a given
point.
Activities: page 19
12. E xplain the different ways of
representing Earth’s surface.
12.1. Describe the most common conventional
symbols used on maps.
(Linguistic communication)
• Read a legend correctly.
Activities: page 18
13. R ecognise and locate a place
or geographic location in
space using maps with
different scales.
13.1. Interpret graphic and numeric scales on a map.
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
• Know how to use a legend on a
map.
Activities: page 18
Earth: Characteristics. Movements
and their effects.
Layers of the Earth: basic
characteristics.
learning standards
• Recognise the planets in the solar
system and their characteristics.
Activities: pages 10, 11 and 24
• Identify Earth among the other
planets in the solar system.
Activities: pages 10 and 11
• List and describe the layers of
Earth.
Activities: page 17
Unit 1
21
Teaching programme
Methodological suggestions
1. Previous knowledge
Based on the curriculum, most of the concepts covered in this unit were already studied by the pupils in Social Science
class during year three:
• The universe.
• The solar system and its characteristics and components.
• The movements of rotation and revolution and their effects on Earth’s dynamics.
• Space exploration and its contribution to science and technology.
• The Moon and how its dynamics affect Earth.
2. Possible areas of difficulty
Pupils may encounter some difficulties when studying this unit, especially with regard to the following aspects:
• The concept of time zones may be difficult for pupils to grasp, especially given that it is necessary to add or subtract
depending on the direction you are moving in. In addition, the point of reference they will use will be GMT+1 (except for
the Canary Islands).
• Another aspect which pupils may have certain difficulty understanding is the water cycle.
• Working with different scales, grasping the relationship between the graphic and numeric scales, and between these
scales and reality, also poses additional difficulty.
• Lastly, locating points using geographic coordinates may also be complicated if they have not mastered the concept of
the cardinal points.
3. Innovation programmes
Cooperative Learning
Each unit includes suggested dynamics for working on cooperative learning. These dynamics are developed in the Cooperative Learning Guide,
included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Learning to think
Each unit offers the possibility to use the language and contents learnt throughout a series of activities related to the topic. Pupils develop
thinking strategies to work through the different content covered in the units. These suggestions are fully developed in the Learning to Think
Guide, included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Values
Science working for humanity: understand the importance of human curiosity and scientific advances.
4. Suggested distribution of sessions
For the development of this unit, we recommend dividing the work into twelve sessions, organised as follows:
Introduction
content
Review
skills
Final task
1 session
6 sessions
2 sessions
2 sessions
1 session
The above session recommendations are intended as a guide. Each teacher should adapt the recommendations based on
their needs and the number of classroom hours allocated.
22
Unit 1
Multiple intelligences
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
●
Comprehensive listening
●
Oral presentations
●
Learning new languages
●
Debating ideas
●
Acquiring and using new vocabulary
●
INTRAPERSONAL
eading as a group and individual
R
reading
●
●
●
elf-evaluation and metacognition
S
exercises
Critical and creative thinking activities
ctivities involving oral and written
A
expression of ideas and emotions
LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL
●
●
●
stablishing classifications,
E
comparisons and series
INTERPERSONAL
Reading sequences
sing numbering in activities of daily
U
life
●
Logical reasoning
●
Problem-solving
●
●
Multiple
intelligences
Creative projects and group research
sing cooperative learning techniques
U
to work as structured groups
NATURALISTIC
VISUAL-SPATIAL
●
Reading and interpreting images
●
Making maps and routes
●
ctive imagination and visualisation
A
activities
●
bserving images from the natural
O
world
●
Simulating natural phenomena
●
Using images to represent nature
BODILY-KINAESTHETIC
●
●
cting out concepts: performing the
A
content that is being studied
anufacturing and inventing models
M
linked to concepts, ideas or processes
Unit 1
23
Audioscript
2
1. The solar system includes only the Sun and planets
and no other celestial bodies.
2. The Sun is a giant mass of gases.
3. The light and heat we get from the Sun is actually its
internal energy.
4. The Milky Way is the name of our universe.
5. A light year measures time.
Answer key
Who was ...? Open answer.
1. 1) False, we also have asteroids and meteorites.
2) True
3) True
4) False
5) True
2. Open answer.
3. star: Sun: a)
galaxy: Milky Way: c)
system: Solar system: b)
4. It is a natural phenomenon that occurs when the Sun is
hidden behind the Moon.
24
Unit 1
Audioscript
3
TEACHER: OK, Alex, can you name the planets of our
solar system in order?
STUDENT: I think so... Mercury, Venus, Earth, Jupiter,
Uranus, Mars, Neptune and Saturn.
TEACHER: And you, Lisa?
STUDENT 2: Ummm. Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars,
Uranus, Neptune, Saturn and Jupiter.
TEACHER: What about you, Michael?
STUDENT 3: Is it Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter,
Saturn, Uranus and Neptune?
Answer key
Fun fact! Ceres, Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris.
1. The third speaker, Michael.
2. Jupiter is the largest planet. The outer planets (Jupiter,
Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) are gaseous. The inner planets
(Mercury, Venus, Mars, Earth) are rocky and they are
closest to the Sun.
3. Suggested answer: The materials they are made of.
4. Uranus: -200ºC .
5. Open answer.
6. Asteroids, comets, meteors.
7. They occur when the Moon passes between the Sun and
Earth so that the Moon’s shadow falls on Earth.
Unit 1
25
Audioscript
4
26
1. axis
2. seasons
3. one year
4. orbit
5. day and night
6. 24 hours
Unit 1
Answer key
Fun fact! Leap year.
1. Rotation: axis, day and night, 24 hours.
Revolution: seasons, one year, orbit.
2. Days and nights happen when Earth rotates.
3. Winter, because Spain is the northern hemisphere.
4. Open answer.
5. Just a very few times because the Moon’s orbit around
Earth is tilted five degrees to Earth’s orbit around the
Sun. As a result, the Moon’s shadow usually misses Earth
as it passes above or below our planet.
Audioscript
5
1. It describes a crescent or Moon that is getting bigger.
2. It describes a crescent Moon that is getting smaller.
3. It describes when the whole Moon is lit.
4. It describes a half Moon.
Answer key
Fun fact! In the southern hemisphere, people see the Moon
upside down, so the side which is shining seems the
opposite from the northern hemisphere.
1. 2) waning
3) full
4) quarter
1) waxing
2. Suggested answer: They both have rotation and
revolution movements. The two movements of the Moon
last the same, whilst Earth’s two movements have
different lengths.
3. Every 28 days.
4. Suggested answer: The Moon does have a very thin
atmosphere. But it is so thin compared to Earth’s
atmosphere that there’s no air to breathe. That’s why
astronauts have to wear their spacesuits when they get
out of their spacecraft on the surface of the Moon.
5. Open answer.
6. Suggested answer: An eclipse of the Sun can only occur
when there is a New Moon when the Moon passes
between Earth and the Sun.
Unit 1
27
Audioscript
6
1. river
2. frost
3. rain
4. clouds
5. hail
6. water vapour
Answer key
Fun fact! Fresh water.
1. 1) liquid
2) solid
3) liquid
4) gaseous
5) solid
6) gaseous
2. All the fresh water we find in rivers, lakes and
underground water are continental waters. Oceanic
water is the salt water in the seas and oceans.
3. Open answer.
5. Water.
6. Suggested answer: they are closer to the core, where the
Earth’s temperature is much higher.
7. Suggested answer: the shapes of many continents are
like separated pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. Many fossil
findings along the edges of continents suggest
similarities between species that would only make sense
if the two continents were joined in the past. The seismic
activity under Earth’s surface provides more evidence of
this theory.
8. Solar and lunar eclipses. Lunar eclipses are more
common.
28
Unit 1
Audioscript
7
1. What hemisphere Canada is in.
2. What street your school is on.
3. What season it is now in Australia.
4. The best roads to take when driving to Madrid.
5. Which country is bigger, Russia or France?
Answer key
Who was ...? Eratosthenes made a very precise
measurement of Earth’s circumference.
1. 1) Globe.
2) Map.
3) Globe.
4) Map.
5) Globe.
2. Political globe and physical map.
3. Suggested answer:
a) The scale offers the ratio of a distance on the map to
the corresponding distance on the ground.
b) Open answer.
4. Pupils locate Spain’s time zones on the map. The Canary
Islands and Portugal subtract one hour from the rest of
Spain’s time.
5. Spain is on the 40th parallel north
(Latitude: 40.433, Longitude: -3.7). The countries that
have the same latitude share the same parallel.
6. Solar eclipse of August 12, 2026.
Unit 1
29
1
2
3
4
11
12
5
6
7
8
9
10
13
Audioscript
8
TEACHER: OK, class, we’re going to watch a
documentary now about the first landing on the
Moon. Does anyone know what the first mission to
the Moon was?
BOY: Apollo 11!
TEACHER: Yes, that’s right! Good answer, Tom! OK, let’s
start!
NEIL ARMSTRONG: It’s one small step for man, one
giant leap for mankind.
NARRATOR: Those famous words were said on July 16,
1969. When Neil Armstrong stepped on the Moon for the
first time, he left a footprint that is still there today. More
than 40 years ago! How is that possible? The Moon is
surrounded by a very thin layer of gases that can almost
be called an atmosphere. However, it is so very loose that
is technically considered an exosphere. That is why on
the Moon there’s no air to breathe, nor breezes to erase
the footprints left there by the Apollo mission. In fact,
nothing has touched the footprint for over 45 years, and
nothing probably ever will. In fact, experts say ...
Answer key
Mind map: 1) The Milky Way; 2) solar; 3) Sun; 4) Earth and
Mars; 5) rotation; 6) atmosphere; 7) continental; 8) geosphere;
9) maps; 10) meridians; 11) Neptune; 12) Moon; 13) revolution
1. a) Troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere,
thermosphere, and exosphere.
b) Crust, mantle, core.
c) New Moon, first quarter, waxing Moon, full Moon, last
quarter, waning Moon, new Moon.
2.Mercury: inner, small, rocky.
Venus: inner, small, rocky.
Earth: inner, small, rocky.
Mars: inner, small, rocky.
Jupiter: outer, large, gaseous.
Saturn: outer, large, gaseous.
Uranus: outer, large, gaseous.
Neptune: outer, large, gaseous.
3. With the unit of measurement light year.
4. Open answer.
5. latitude: north/south: parallel.
longitude: west/east: meridian
6. Prime Meridian, equator
7. 1) c
2) c
3) a
4) b
30
Unit 1
Answer key
8. a) False
b) True
c) True
d) Doesn’t say
1. 1) star patterns
2) letter
3) constellation
4) bear
5) hunters
6) red
9. c) star
b) satellite
a) planet
d) galaxy
2. Invented.
10. 1) orbit
2) Sun
3) atmosphere
4) crust
3. Ursa Major and Cassiopeia.
4. Open answer.
11. 1) c
2) a
3) b
5. 1) C
2) A
12.
nothern
hemisphere
Earth’s axis
lines of longitude
lines of
latitude
Earth’s rotation
equator
southern
hemisphere
Unit 1
31
2
Relief and climate
This unit builds on the pupils’ knowledge of climate from previous
years and moves on to more specific studies of different climatic
conditions around the world and in Spain.
First, there is a definition of weather and an explanation of what
meteorologists do. The unit moves on to define the concept of
climate and explain the factors which influence it: altitude, latitude
and distance from the sea.
Next, there is an explanation of climate zones and a description of
the planet’s main climate zones; their location and their most
important characteristics. Once the pupils know the world’s main
climate zones, there is a description of the different climates
found in Spain.
Then, the most important forms of relief of Spain are located and
explained. The main rivers of Spain are also introduced and
grouped according to their source and where they end.
Finally, there is an explanation of how the increase in greenhouse
gases is causing climate change.
32
Unit 2
Complementary material
►► Social Science 5 Workbook. Unit 2
Unit Resources
Digital resources
Teacher’s Resources on USB
and at www.smconectados.es
Other materials
Pupil’s Resources on CD and
at www.smsaviadigital.com
Teacher’s materials
Pupil’s materials
Unit 2.
Relief and climate
Diagnosis activity.
Weather man
Tune up. What do
you know about ...?
Web link. Weather
Presentation.
Weather station
Presentation.
Climograph
Animation. Earth’s
climates
Presentation. Climate
and vegetation
Let’s play and learn.
Pressure
Who was …? The
man who named the
clouds
1. Weather
Reinforcement. Worksheet 1
Extension. Worksheet 1
WB page 14
2. Climate
Let’s practise.
Climatic factors
3. Earth’s climate zones
WB page 15
Reinforcement. Worksheet 2
Poster. Earth’s climates
WB pages 16-17
4. Spain’s climate zones
Extension. Worksheet 2
Poster. Spain’s climates
WB page 18
Let’s play and learn.
Spain´s coasts
Web link. What is
climate change?
5. The rivers of Spain
WB page 19
6. The relief of Spain
WB page 20
7. Climate change
WB page 21
Let’s understand.
Climate change
Presentation. Mind
map
Review
Review unit 2
Assessment unit 2
Assessment. Term 1
Test yourself. Selfevaluation
Skills
Assessment. Rubric
Final task
Test yourself. Check
the way you have
learnt
Unit 2
33
Teaching programme
UNIT AIMS
COMPETENCES
1. Define and differentiate between weather and climate.
2. Learn about the elements of weather and the main instruments used to
predict it.
3. Understand the factors that determine climate.
4. Identify where the planet’s different climate zones are located. Learn their
main characteristics.
5 Learn about the main climates in Spain.
Social and civic competence
(Aims 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
Mathematical competence and basic competence in science and technology
(Aim 7)
6. Identify the main consequences of and solutions for climate change.
Linguistic communication
(Aims 8 and 9)
7. Use mathematical knowledge to process information when preparing
climographs and graphs related to weather and climate.
Competence in learning to learn
(Aim 10)
8. Define concepts related to the unit.
Digital competence
(Aim 11)
9. Prepare written texts on the unit content.
10. Share ideas and opinions with the group, demonstrating a respectful attitude.
11. Use new technologies to work on unit content.
34
contents
assessment criteria
learning standards
Gathering information on the subject
using different sources.
1. Obtain specific, significant
information about previously defined
events and phenomena, using
different sources.
1.1. Find, select and organise specific,
significant information. Analyse it,
reach conclusions, reflect on the
process and communicate orally or
in writing.
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Compile information from different
sources and interpret it.
Activities: pages 25 to 40.
Using information and
communications technology (ICT) to
search for and select information.
Presenting conclusions.
2. With guidance, use ICT to complete
assignments using terminology
appropriate to the subjects.
2.1. Use ICT to complete assignments
using terminology appropriate to
the subjects.
(Digital competence)
• Use ICT as a tool for learning and
self-assessment.
Interactive activities on
Saviadigital, pages 26, 27, 28, 29
and 35.
Using and reading different textual
and graphic languages, with guidance
and simple models.
3. Learn and use strategies for
developing responsibility, the ability
to work hard and perseverance with
regard to schoolwork.
3.1. Use the specific vocabulary related
to the subject correctly, orally and
in writing.
(Linguistic communication)
• Prepare definitions of concepts.
Activities: pages 26, 27, 29, 31,
35 and 37.
Developing strategies to organise,
memorise and retrieve information
obtained using different methods and
sources.
4. Complete individual and group
assignments, developing the ability
to work hard as part of the learning
process.
4.1. Complete group assignments,
demonstrating a responsible and
respectful attitude.
(Competence in learning to learn)
4.2. Complete the assigned tasks and
submit clear, neat and organised work.
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Participate actively in completing
group assignments.
Skills, Final task, page 39, page
41. Final task page 40.
Climate. Climate elements and factors.
5. Identify the elements that influence
climate, explaining how they act on
it. Gain an understanding of climate
and the factors which determine it.
5.1. Define climate. Name the factors
that determine it in the local
climate zone.
(Linguistic communication)
• Explain what weather and climate are.
• Identify the elements of weather.
Activities: pages 26, 27, 28 and 29
• Recognise the main elements of
climate.
Activities: pages 26, 27, 28 and
29
• Understand how factors influence
climatic diversity.
Activities: page 29
Unit 2
learning outcomes
Teaching programme
contents
The planet’s major climate zones.
The climate types found in Spain and
its immediate area. Characteristics.
Plant species found in each of Spain’s
climate zones.
assessment criteria
6. Recognise the Earth’s climate zones
and the climate types in Spain.
Identify the zones affected by each
one and some of their basic
characteristics.
learning standards
learning outcomes
6.1. Explain what a climate zone is.
Name the planet’s climate zones
and describe their main
characteristics.
(Mathematical competence and
basic competence in science and
technology)
• Recognise meteorological instruments
and identify what they are used for.
Activities: page 27
• Differentiate between climate zones
based on their characteristics.
Activities: pages 30 and 31
• Understand the relationship between
climate and vegetation.
Activities: page 40
• List the different climates in Spain.
Activities: pages 32 and 33
• Prepare and analyse climographs.
Activities: pages 28, 29 and 39
• Identify similarities and differences
between climographs.
Activities: pages 33 and 37
6.2. Explain why plants have special
characteristics depending on the
climate zone where they grow.
(Mathematical competence and
basic competence in science and
technology)
6.3. Describe the climate types in
Spain and the zones affected by
each one. Indicate them on a
map.
(Mathematical competence and
basic competence in science and
technology)
6.4. Interpret and analyse climographs
for different parts of Spain and
associate them with the climate
they belong to.
(Mathematical competence and
basic competence in science and
technology)
The geographical diversity of the
natural landscapes in Spain: relief,
climate and hydrography.
7. Describe and locate on a map the
characteristics of the relief of Spain
as well as its climate and
hydrographic network.
7.1. Explain the characteristics of the
relief in Spain.
(Social and civic competence)
7.2. Locate on a map the main units of
inland and coastal relief in Spain
and its natural barriers.
(Social and civic competence)
7.3. Locate on a map the main rivers of
each area and the major
tributaries.
(Social and civic competence)
7.4. Locate on a map the Balearic and
Canary Islands with the names of
their main islands and the cities of
Ceuta and Melilla.
(Social and civic competence)
• Identify the main units of relief in
Spain.
Activities: pages 36, 36, 40 and
41
• Complete activities based on finding
units of inland and coastal relief of
Spain and its natural barriers on
maps.
Activities: pages 36, 36, 40 and
41
• Complete activities based on the
rivers of Spain.
Activities: pages 34, 35 and 40
• Identify the Spanish archipelagos in
activities.
Activities: pages 36, 36, 40 and
41
Climate change: causes and
consequences.
8. Explain how our actions affect the
climate and climate change.
8.1. Observe and describe the effects of
climate change and the actions
necessary to fight it.
(Social and civic competence)
• Understand the causes and
consequences of climate change.
Activities: pages 34 and 39
• Evaluate the everyday activities
which help combat it.
Activities: pages 35
Unit 2
35
Teaching programme
Methodological suggestions
1. Previous knowledge
Based on the curriculum, most of the concepts covered in this unit were already studied in Social Science class during year
four:
• Weather and how it is measured.
• Elements of climate, factors that determine climate.
• The climates of Spain.
2. Possible areas of difficulty
Pupils may encounter some difficulties when studying this unit, especially with regard to the following aspects:
• The difference between weather and climate may cause some problems for pupils, as the two terms are sometimes
used interchangeably in daily life to refer to the weather at a given time.
• Another aspect which may create confusion among pupils is the difference between altitude and latitude when
analysing climate factors.
• Understanding the concept of the greenhouse effect and how it is not something negative or harmful for the planet,
but rather a natural process, as the phenomenon is normally associated with climate change. Pupils may have difficulty
understanding when it becomes harmful. Make pupils aware that with small daily activities, they can help take action to
combat climate change.
• Lastly, making climographs and graphs may present an added difficulty if they have not worked with them before.3
3. Innovation programmes
Cooperative Learning
Each unit includes suggested dynamics for working on cooperative learning. These dynamics are developed in the Cooperative Learning Guide,
included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Learning to think
Each unit offers the possibility to use the language and contents learnt through a series of activities related to the topic. Pupils develop
thinking strategies to work through the different content covered in the units. These suggestions are fully developed in the Learning to Think
Guide.
Values
The importance of caring for the planet. Scientists have warned people of the things they do that harm the planet. Do you know what the
three R’s are? How can they help our planet? Give examples of things you do that follow one of the three R’s.
4. Suggested distribution of sessions
For the development of this unit, we recommend dividing the work into thirteen sessions, organised as follows:
INTRODUCTION
content
REVIEW
skILLS
Final tASKS
1 session
7 sessions
2 sessions
2 sessions
1 session
The above session recommendations are intended as a guide. Each teacher should adapt the recommendations based on
their needs and the number of classroom hours allocated.
36
Unit 2
Multiple intelligences
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
●
Comprehensive listening
●
Oral presentations
●
Learning new languages
●
Debating ideas
●
Acquiring and using new vocabulary
●
eading as a group and individual
R
reading
INTRAPERSONAL
●
elf-evaluation and metacognition
S
exercises
●
Critical and creative thinking activities
●
ctivities involving oral and written
A
expression of ideas and emotions
LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL
●
Reading and using graphic organisers
●
nalysing statistical data and numerical
A
facts
●
sing numbering in activities of daily
U
life
●
Logical reasoning
●
Problem-solving
INTERPERSONAL
●
Creative projects and group research
●
sing cooperative learning techniques
U
to work as structured groups
Multiple
intelligences
NATURALISTIC
VISUAL-SPATIAL
●
Creating charts and diagrams
●
Reading and interpreting images
●
Making maps and routes
●
bserving images from the natural
O
world
●
Simulating natural phenomena
●
Applying the scientific method
●
Using simple weather stations
BODILY-KINAESTHETIC
●
●
ands-on activities that involve
H
handling and experimenting with
objects
anufacturing and inventing models
M
linked to concepts, ideas or processes
Unit 2
37
Audioscript
9
Hi, I’m meteorologist John Smith with today’s weather
report. People living in the south of the country can
expect a wonderful sunny day! Unfortunately for those
of you living in the north, looks like rain for today and
tomorrow—so make sure to take an umbrella with you!
Answer key
Who was ...? Cirrostratus, cirrocumulus, stratus and
cumulonimbus.
1. a) Meteorologist.
b) Today’s weather report.
c) No, only in the north.
2. Suggested answer: Rainy and snowy in the north, cloudy
in the centre and in some parts of both archipelagos, and
sunny in the rest of Spain.
3. After their research, pupils should reach the conclusion
that it is usually coldest in the mornings.
38
Unit 2
Audioscript
10
a)Where I live the climate is very hot and dry because
my home is at a low altitude that is near the
equator.
b)My name is Simu. It is always hot here where I live
because it is on the equator. My village is inland, but
at sea level.
c)It is very cold on the coast where I live because
winds from the Arctic Ocean keep temperatures
very low.
Answer key
Fun fact! Open answer.
1. a) The Sahara desert: altitude and latitude.
b) The African savannah: latitude, altitude and distance
from the sea.
c) The Siberian tundra: distance from the sea and
latitude.
2. Suggested answer:
Climate is the typical weather of a region for a long
period of time.
Weather is what the atmosphere is like in a place at a
particular time.
3. a) This is a climate graph and it allows us to see the
typical weather in a place throughout the year.
b) This place is hot and dry in the summer because
temperatures are high and there is little precipitation.
Unit 2
39
Audioscript
11
TEACHER: OK class, time for our presentations. Group
1, can you come up to the front of the class, please?
BOY: The tropical climate zone is directly north and
south of the equator. It has warm temperatures all
year round. There really is no winter there.
GIRL: You can find temperate climate zones on either
side of the tropical zone. They have warm summers
and cold winters.
BOY: There are two polar zones. One that is in the Arctic
Circle and one that is in the Antarctic Circle. They
have low temperatures all year round. There really is
no summer there.
TEACHER: Well done! OK, group two, your turn!
40
Unit 2
Answer key
1. Tropical climate zone: north and south of the equator, no
winters.
Temperate climate zones: warm summers, cold winters.
Polar climate zones: Antarctic circle, Arctic circle.
2. Open answer.
3. Open answer.
4. Fir trees:temperate and polar zones
Olive trees: temperate zones
Cacti: temperate and tropical zones
Audioscript
12
1. This climate is along Spain’s north-western coast.
2. Most of central Spain has this climate.
3. Mountain chains like the Pyrenees have this climate.
4. The only place in Spain with this climate is the Canary
Islands.
5. Spain’s eastern and southern coasts have this
climate.
Answer key
1.
3
1
2
5
4
Mountain
Oceanic
Inland Mediterranean
Coastal Mediterranean
Subtropical
2. a) Similarities: higher temperatures during the summer
with little precipitation and lower temperatures during
the winter. Differences: in the climograph a) the
temperatures are more constant throughout the year
and it is not as cold during the winter as in the
climograph b).
b) Climograph a) belongs to the Inland Mediterranean
climate. Climograph b) belongs to the Oceanic climate.
3. Open answer.
Unit 2
41
Audioscript
13
The river Ebro belongs to the Mediterranean
watershed. It is Spain’s longest river because it starts in
Cantabria and flows into Cataluña. Its main tributaries
are the Segre, Jalón, Aragón, Gállego and Cinca.
Spain’s Atlantic watershed is the largest. The rivers
Duero, Tajo, Guadiana and Guadalquivir all belong to
this watershed. The river Duero starts at Picos de
Urbión in Soria and flows into Portugal. Its main
tributaries are the Pisuerga, the Esla and Tormes. The
river Guadalquivir is a navigable river that begins in
Sierra de Cazorla in Jaén and flows into Sanlúcar de
Barrameda in Cádiz. Its main tributaries are the Genil,
Jándula and Guadalimar. The river Tajo starts at sierra
de Albarracín, Teruel, and flows into Lisbon, Portugal.
Because it is the longest river on the peninsula, it has
many tributaries, like the Jarama, Guadarrama,
Alberche, Tiétar and Alagón. The river Guadiana starts
in Ciudad Real in Castilla-La Mancha and flows into the
Golfo de Cádiz between Portugal and the province of
Huelva in Spain. Its tributaries are the rivers Zújar,
Záncara and Cigüela.
Answer key
Fun fact! Suggested answer: Guadiana, Guadarrama or
Guadelete.
42
Unit 2
1.
River
Watershed
Duero
Atlantic
Soria
Portugal Pisuerga, Esla and Tormes
Tajo
Atlantic
Soria
Portugal Pisuerga, Esla and Tormes
Ebro
Starts
Ends
Mediterranean Cantabria Cataluña
Main tributaries
Segre, Jalón, Aragón,
Gállego and Cinca
Guadiana
Atlantic
Teruel
Portugal
Jarama, Guadarrama,
Alberche, Tiétar and
Alagón
Guadalquivir
Atlantic
Ciudad
Real
Golfo de
Cádiz
Zújar, Záncara and
Cigüela
2. Open answer.
3. Suggested answer: It flows into the Mediterranean
watershed. It is the longest and largest river in Spain and
the one with the heaviest water flow.
4. River Nansa: Cantabrian watershed
River Pisuerga: Atlantic watershed
River Ebro: Mediterranean watershed
5. Cantabrian watershed: oceanic climate zone and
abundant water flow.
Atlantic watershed: oceanic climate zone with abundant
water flow and inland Mediterranean climate zone with
an irregular water flow.
Mediterranean watershed: Mediterranean climate zones
and an irregular water flow, except the Ebro which has an
abundant and regular water flow.
Audioscript
14
1. These are mountains surrounding the Meseta Central
at the southeast.
2. These are mountains in the northeast that separate
Spain from France.
3. This is a large, high plain that covers the centre of the
peninsula.
4. These are a group of Spanish islands in the Atlantic
Ocean.
5. These are mountains that divide the Meseta Central
into two halves.
6. This is a low area surrounding the river Ebro.
Answer key
Fun fact! In Spain, volcanoes are in the Canary Islands.
1. 1) Sierra Morena
2) the Pyrenees
3) the Meseta Central
4) the Canary Islands
5) the Sistema Central
6) Depression of the Ebro
2. The Iberian Peninsula belongs to the European continent.
The Spanish territories are located in the European and
African continents.
3. A) Territories of the Iberian Peninsula that do not belong
to Spain: Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra.
Spain’s natural borders: the Cantabrian Sea, the
Mediterranean Sea, the Atlantic Ocean and the
Pyrenees.
B) Other peninsulas in Europe: Italian Peninsula,
Peloponese Peninsula, Balkan Peninsula, Scandinavian
Peninsula.
The regions farthest north (Galicia), farthest south
(Andalucía), farthest east (Cataluña) and farthest west
(Galicia) of the peninsular Spanish territories.
4.
Mountain chain
Highest peak
Cordillera Cantábrica
Torre Cerredo
Pyrenees
Sistema Ibérico
Sistema Bético
Aneto
Moncayo
Mulhacén
Unit 2
43
Audioscript
15
1. This is a fossil fuel that people burn. We dig up the
hard pieces from deep underground.
2. This is an eco-friendly energy source that turns the
wind’s energy into electrical energy.
3. This is a man-made lake to collect water. We use this
water for drinking, watering crops and even to make
electricity.
4. This is a fossil fuel that we use to make gasoline for
our cars, fuel for our airplanes and even plastics for
many objects.
Answer key
1. a) coal
b) wind farm
c) reservoir
d) crude oil
2. Suggested answer: Most of the Sun’s energy returns to
space, but some is kept by the heat-trapping gases. This
natural greenhouse effect keeps our planet warm
enough to live on.
3. Suggested answer: The greenhouse effect and global
warming both describe the process by which certain
gases absorb the Sun’s radiation in the atmosphere. The
greenhouse effect is a natural and beneficial process,
whilst global warming is the rise in the average
temperature of Earth caused by certain human activities
that add extra heat-trapping gases to the atmosphere
and keep too much of the Sun’s radiation in it.
4. Open answer.
44
Unit 2
1
4
3
2
6
5
7
8
12
9
13
14
10
15
16
17
20
18
19
21
11
MOTHER: Come on, Kim, or you’ll be late for school.
2. I work in Alaska. Usually there’s lots of snow, but it’s
summer now and all you can see are grasses and
shrubs along the low tundra.
3. I’m on an international cooperation project in Africa.
I’m surprised by the dry fields of grass along the
savannah.
17
esterday was a beautiful sunny day, so my family and I
Y
went hiking in the mountains. There was a beautiful
forest and we saw a squirrel.
Answer key
1. 1) wind; 2) temperature; 3) latitude; 4) tropical; 5)
temperate; 6) fossil fuels; 7) deforestation; 8)
temperature; 9) Iberian Peninsula; 10) Canary Islands;
Balearic Islands; Ceuta; 11) Melilla; 12) Oceanic; 13) Inland
Mediterranean; 14) Coastal Mediterranean; 15)
Mountain; 16) Cantabrian; 17) Atlantic; 18)
Mediterranean; 19) Ebro; 20) Meseta Central; 21)
depressions
2. Open answer.
Spain has mountains surrounding the Meseta Central
and mountains beyond it, like the Pyrenees and the
Sistemas Béticos.
4. 1. c) 2. a) 3. b) 4. a)
5. Kim: picture 1, Dave: picture 3, Maggie: picture 2.
6. a) sunny.
7. a) wind, it is an element of the weather, not a
measurement device.
b) polar, it is not a climate of Spain.
c) rainy, it is not a type of climate, but a weather condition.
d) Tropical, it is not a weather condition, but a type of climate.
8.
Cordillera
Cantábrica
Meseta
Central
Sistema
Central
Sierra
Morena
Canary
Islands
Pyrenees
Depresión
del Ebro
C a n t a b r i a n S ea
F R A N C E
ANDORRA
Sistema
Ibérico
P O R
T U
G A
L
1. B
OY: My family and I live on a farm. My brother and I
like running through the wheat fields when the grass
is nice and tall.
O C E A
N
16
3. Spain has territories on the Iberian Peninsula, in the
Atlantic Ocean and in northern Africa.
A T L A N T I C
Audioscript
n
e a
a n
r r
e
t
i
M e d
a
S e
Depresión del
Guadalquivir
Balearic
Islands
Sistemas
Béticos
9. a) Rovaniemi is colder and has more rain.
b) Rovaniemi belongs to the polar climate and Riad
belongs to the tropical climate.
Unit 2
45
Answer key
1. 1) weather
2) storm
3) deserts
4) built
5) sky
6) Moon
2. 1) C
2) A
3) B
3. a) rain
b) cold weather
46
Unit 2
Notes
Unit 2
47
Answer key
Answer key
1. c)
The Sun has disappeared!
2. b)
1. a) In the first photograph there is a partial eclipse of the
Sun, while in the second one, the Moon has totally
covered the star.
3. c)
4. a)
5. b)
6. b)
7. c)
8. c)
9. c)
10. a)
b) The Moon and the Sun.
c) The movement a planet makes around the Sun. The
Moon is also orbiting around Earth. Sometimes Earth,
the Moon and the Sun line up exactly, so the Moon is
in front of the Sun.
2. The pupils must write a short essay about the geocentric
model. In this case, it would be the Sun which would
move to a position behind the Moon.
Catastrophes caused by climate change
1. a) hurricane; b) flood; c) drought
2. a) They have high temperatures and little precipitation. It
is characteristic of the areas along the equator.
b) The pupil must reflect on how climate change
increases the risk of heavy rain in some zones whilst
reducing rainfall in others, thus causing simultaneous
incidents of flooding and drought, with catastrophic
effects for people.
c) Yes, there are ways of finding the necessary
information to forecast what the weather will be like
and the type of natural catastrophes it will cause.
48
Term 1
Answer key
Answer key
It’s so hot you can fry an egg!
Real life star wars
The pupil will have to estimate the temperature of their
surroundings that day taking into account that it is not a
constant value, but that it changes throughout the day.
Human beings have only been to the Moon.
Watch the wind!
I’m thirsty!
Wind speed is measured with an anemometer and wind
direction with a weather vane.
The climate of the Sahara desert is a desert climate.
The Ice Age
Olympic waterfall
Rain is the precipitation of water from the clouds. It forms
part of the water cycle.
The blue planet
No, Earth is a geoid. Neptune and Uranus also have a blue
colour, but there is no water on them.
They need to cross a large ice sheet that covered the oceans
during the Ice Age. In this period, most of the water on
Earth was frozen because the climate changed and Earth’s
temperature dropped.
Together is better
The coldest zones on Earth are found in latitudes above the
Polar circles and on the peaks of the main mountain ranges.
Term 1
49
3
Population
The unit starts by explaining to the pupils the characteristics and
evolution of the population, for this maps and graphs representing
various demographics are presented. Then, the concept of
population density is explained.
In each section special attention is given to the Spanish
population. The unit ends with a study of the changes in the
Spanish population over time using graphs and timelines to help
explain them.
50
Unit 3
Complementary material
►► Social Science 5 Workbook. Unit 3
Unit Resources
Digital resources
Teacher’s Resources on USB
and at www.smconectados.es
Other materials
Pupil’s Resources on CD and
at www.smsaviadigital.com
Diagnostic activity.
Population
Tune up What do
you know about ...?
Teacher’s materials
Pupil’s materials
Unit 3.
Population
1. Population growth
Reinforcement. Worksheet 1
WB page 26
Presentation.
Population density
in Spain
Presentation. Rural
population in Spain
Web link. Population
pyramid
2. Population density
Let’s understand.
Spain’s population
distribution
WB page 27
3. Changes in Spain’s population
Let’s understand.
Changes in
Spain’s population
distribution
Fun fact! Population
milestones
Presentation.
Mind map
Reinforcement. Worksheet 2
Extension. Worksheet 1
WB pages 28-29
Review
Review unit 3
Assessment unit 3
Test yourself. Selfevaluation
Skills
Final task
Assessment. Rubric
Test yourself. Check
the way you have
learnt
Unit 3
51
Teaching programme
UNIT AIMS
COMPETENCES
1. Describe the distribution of the Spanish population and understand the
demographic processes which affect it.
2. Understand the evolution of the Spanish population through history.
3. Use demographic rates correctly to understand population traits.
4. Apply mathematical skills to interpret and create different types of graphs.
5. Carry out group work on the unit content.
Mathematical competence and basic competence in science and technology
(Aim 4)
Linguistic communication
(Aims 6 and 7)
Competence in learning to learn
(Aim 5)
6. Define the concepts related to the unit.
Digital competence
(Aim 8)
7. Develop written texts about the unit content.
8. Use new technologies to complete activities.
52
Social and civic competence
(Aims 1, 2 and 3)
contents
assesSment criteria
learning standards
Gathering information on the subject
using different sources.
1. Obtain specific, significant
information about previously defined
events and phenomena, using
different sources.
1.1. Find, select and organise specific,
significant information. Analyse it,
reach conclusions, reflect on the
process and communicate orally or
in writing.
(Competence in learning to learn)
(Linguistic communication)
• Complete activities using sources of
information such as images.
Activities: pages 53, 55 and, 57
Developing strategies to organise,
memorise and retrieve information
obtained using different methods and
sources.
2. Learn and use strategies for
developing responsibility, the ability
to work hard and perseverance with
regard to schoolwork.
2.1. Apply strategies for developing
responsibility, the ability to work
hard and perseverance with regard
to schoolwork.
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Engage in self-assessment and learn
the relationship between effort and
results.
Activities: page 56
Use and read different texts and
graphs.
3. Carry out work and presentations
both individually and in a group
which involve the search, selection
and organisation of texts which are
social, geographical or historical,
showing an ability to work alone or
in a team.
3.1. Carry out work and presentations
both individually and in a group
which involve the search, selection
and organisation of texts which are
social, geographical or historical.
(Linguistic communication)
• Carry out activities using texts.
Final task, page 60
Using information and
communications technology to search
for and select information. Presenting
conclusions.
4. With guidance, use information and
communications technology to obtain
information and learn to express
content.
4.1. Use information and
communications technology to
complete assignments using
terminology appropriate to the
subjects.
(Digital competence)
• Use ICT as a tool for learning and
self-assessment.
Interactive activities on
Saviadigital, pages 53, 55, 57 and
60.
Unit 3
learning outcomes
Teaching programme
contents
Population growth
- Spain’s population growth.
Population density
- Spain’s population density.
Changes in Spain’s population.
assesSment criteria
learning standards
learning outcomes
5. Understand the main
demographic concepts and
how they relate to
geographical, social, economic
or cultural factors based on
population data.
5.1. Explain the concept of population density and
know how to calculate it. Interpret a population
pyramid and other graphs used in the study of
population.
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
• Interpret population density maps
and graphs.
Activities: page 53
• Define the concept of population
density.
Activities: page 53
6. Distinguish the main freatures
of the Spanish and European
populations, explain their
evolution and demographic
distribution and represent this
on a graph.
6.1. Describe the main features of the Spanish
population. Explain the evolutionary process of
the population in Spain and in Europe and
describe the impact on them of such things as
life expectancy and birth. Describe the factors
which influence the distribution of the Spanish
and European population. Locate on a map the
major population centres in Spain and the most
densely populated areas.
(Linguistic communication)
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
• Describe the basic characteristics
of the Spanish population from
knowledge of their area.
Activities: pages 50, 53, 55 and 57
• Explain the evolutionary process of
the Spanish population.
Activities: pages 50, 55 and 56
7. Analyse the migratory
movements of the Spanish
population.
7.1. Recognise the importance of migration in the
world and in our environment. Explain the rural
exodus, the immigration to Europe and the arrival
of immigrants to our country. Identify and
describe the main problems with population:
overpopulation, ageing, immigration etc.
(Social and civic competence)
• Identify the main characteristics of
the immigrants that live in Spain.
Activities: page 50
• Understand the most important
migratory processes in Spain.
Activities: pages 50, 55 and 57
Unit 3
53
Teaching programme
Methodological suggestions
1. Previous knowledge
Based on the curriculum, most of the concepts covered in this unit were already studied by the pupils in Social Science
during previous years:
• The population of the country. Classification criteria.
• Factors that change the population of a country: birth, death, emigration and immigration.
2. Possible areas of difficulty
Pupils may encounter some difficulties when studying this unit, especially with regard to the following aspects:
• The first difficulty may be related to some of the demographic content: concepts such as population density or the
relationship between different demographic dynamics like birth, death or life expectancy.
• Working with bar graphs, both making and interpreting them, may include some additional degree of difficulty.
• In general, it can be challenging for the students to process and assimilate the wealth of specific vocabulary presented
in this unit.
3. Innovation programmes
Cooperative learning
Each unit includes suggested dynamics for working on cooperative learning. These dynamics are developed in the Cooperative Learning Guide,
included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Learning to think
Each unit offers the possibility to use the language and contents learnt throughout a series of activities related to the topic. Pupils develop
thinking strategies to work through the different content covered in the units. These suggestions are fully developed in the Learning to Think
Guide.
Values
The importance of respecting diversity. Respecting the characteristics that make countries different from each other and appreciating those
that make us similar is the best way to enrich our own lives.
4. Suggested distribution of sessions
For the development of this unit, we recommend dividing the work into nine sessions, organised as follows:
INTRODUCTION
content
REVIEW
SKILLS
Final task
1 session
3 sessions
2 sessions
2 sessions
1 session
The above session recommendations are intended as a guide. Each teacher should adapt the recommendations based on
their needs and the number of classroom hours allocated.
54
Unit 3
Multiple intelligences
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
●
Comprehensive listening
●
Acquiring and using new vocabulary
●
Creative writing
INTRAPERSONAL
●
elf-evaluation and metacognition
S
exercises
LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL
●
●
nalysing statistical data and numerical
A
facts
INTERPERSONAL
Logical reasoning
●
●
Multiple
intelligences
Creative projects and group research
sing cooperative learning techniques
U
to work as structured groups
NATURALISTIC
VISUAL-SPATIAL
●
●
Applying the scientific method
Reading and interpreting images
BODILY-KINAESTHETIC
●
ance: creating and performing
D
choreographies related to concepts,
ideas or processes
Unit 3
55
Audioscript
18
1. This is the number of deaths in a year for every 1,000
people.
2. This is the difference between immigration and
emigration.
3. This is the sum of natural increase and net migration.
4. These are the people that leave a place to go to live
and work somewhere else.
5. This is the number of babies born in one year minus
the number of deaths.
Answer key
Fun fact! That is a positive natural increase.
1. 1) birth rate
2) net migration
3) population growth
4) emigration
5) natural increase
2. a) The birth rate has decreased and life expectancy has
increased in Spain.
b) Because there are a low birth rate and a high life
expectancy.
An ageing population results in less people working,
therefore contributing less money, while at the same
time, more people need financial and health
assistance.
c) Women live longer than men. According to the graph,
this has been so in Spain, at least since 1920.
3. -3 per 1,000. Spain’s growth rate is decreasing.
4. This is possible because the number of emigrants can be
higher than the number of immigrants plus the rate of
natural increase.
5. Africa’s population grows at a faster speed.
56
Unit 3
Audioscript
19
PRESENTER: Today we are talking to Miss García, she
works for the National Institute of Statistics. Good
morning, Miss García.
MISS GARCÍA: Good morning.
PRESENTER: Miss García, what do you do at your work?
MISS GARCÍA: I study things about Spain’s population:
where people live, where they work, what they do in
their free time ...
PRESENTER: Really? And why is this information
important?
MISS GARCÍA: It’s important because it can tell us
where problems are in our society.
PRESENTER: Could you give us an example?
MISS GARCÍA: For example, our greatest concern is
unemployment, because the more people who don’t
have work, the less they pay in taxes but the more
they need in services. This means the government
gets less money but needs to pay more.
PRESENTER: That’s interesting …, in fact the last
National Institute of Statistics report reveals that
Spanish unemployment data is approaching 20% ...
Answer key
Fun fact! The census is a record which is drawn up every ten
years that collects information on the number of people
who live in a country, as well as their gender, age and
nationality.
1.
● Miss
García.
works for the National Institute of Statistics.
● Unemployment.
● She
2.
● The
least populated Autonomous Communities are the
ones in inland areas such as Castilla-La Mancha, Castilla y
León, Aragón and Extremadura. The most populated are
the ones situated on the coast and its two archipelagos.
● Madrid, Barcelona, Bilbao and Valencia.
3. Suggested answer: Coastal areas in Spain generally have
a higher economic activity due to fishing and commercial
ports as well as a very high rate of ’sun and beach’
tourism. Furthermore, a coastal climate is a lot milder
than an inland climate.
4. There are more people living on certain continents than
on others.
Unit 3
57
Audioscript
20
1. There are more babies being born nowadays.
2. More people lived longer in the past.
3. There were more children than adults in the past.
4. Nowadays, most people in Spain are between the
ages of 30 and 40.
5. Nowadays, men live longer than women.
Answer key
Fun fact! The fourth billion was reached in 1974, the fifth
billion in 1987 and the sixth billion in 1999.
1. 1) False, there are less babies being born nowadays.
2) False, the death rate was high because of epidemics,
wars and famine.
3) True.
4) False, most people in Spain are between the ages of
35 and 45.
5) False, men live the same as women.
2. Suggested answer: During the Middle Ages, the death
rate in Spain was very high because of famine. Since the
mid-20th century, Spain’s death rate fell thanks to
medical advances. This was also a time of a great rural
exodus in which many people left a life in the country for
one in the city. Social changes have affected Spain’s
population since 1975. Women started working outside
of the home which is why they have less children.
58
Unit 3
3. a) Spain’s population pyramid of 1900.
b) Spain’s population pyramid of 2014.
c) Spain’s population pyramid of 2014.
4. There are more baby boys born than baby girls, but there
are more elderly women than elderly men.
5. Spain is a more developed country because its population
pyramid shape has a small base.
6. North America has the highest life expectancy rate and
Africa has the largest younger population.
1
3
2
6
4
7
5
8
Audioscript
21
1. Which age groups are biggest in this population?
2. This population has more ...
3. The life expectancy of this population is ...
4. This pyramid is representative of ...
Now, check your answers:
1. The biggest age groups in this population are
between the ages of 10 and 19.
2. This population has more young adults.
3. The life expectancy of this population is low.
4. This pyramid is representative of a less developed
country.
Answer key
1. 1) place; 2) natural; 3) net; 4) distribution; 5) ageing;
6) inhabitants; 7) coast; 8) urban
2. a) positive; b) ageing; c) 47; d) coast.
3. The real growth of the Spanish population is positive
even though there has been a negative migration
balance since 2010.
4. Suggested answer:
natural increase: the birth rate minus the death rate.
demography: the study of human populations.
population density: number of inhabitants per km2.
5. Albacete: 26,9 inhab./km2; Burgos: 26,2 inhab./km2
Granada: 72,9 inhab./km2; Guipuzcoa: 359,6 inhab./
km2
6. a) Provinces on the coast are more populated.
b) Provinces inland are less populated except for Madrid
which is densely populated.
7. 1) a; 2) a; 3) a; 4) b
a) Villapequeña’s natural increase was negative.
b) Its net migration was positive and its population
growth rate was positive.
c) The village’s population growth would be negative.
8. 1) a; 2) c; 3) a; 4) b
9. a) The ageing rate is over 18% in the provinces of Galicia,
Asturias, Cantabria, País Vasco, Navarra, La Rioja,
Castilla y León, Extremadura and Aragón, Lleida,
Ciudad Real, Albacete, Jaén and Alicante.
b) The ageing rate is under 15% in Las Palmas, Cádiz,
Sevilla, Almería, the Region of Murcia, Ceuta, Melilla
and the Balearic Islands.
c) The most densely populated areas are the ones with a
higher economic activity, where there is more work.
The younger, working age population migrate to these
areas looking for work.
10. Open answer.
Unit 3
59
Answer key
1. 1) to
2) their
3) increases
4) enough
5) play
6) jobs
7) time
2. 1) A
2) C
3) A
4) A
5) B
6) A
3. Open answer.
60
Unit 3
Notes
Unit 3
61
4
The economy and its sectors
This unit is an introduction to a particularly difficult subject for
pupils of this age: What is the economy and what are the three
sectors into which economic activity is organised?
However, from previous courses, they have already been
introduced to economic activity and relations. So the topic is not
completely new.
Firstly, the economy is explained, as well as the agents and factors
involved in economic activity.
Next, the three economic sectors are explained (primary,
secondary and tertiary). Special attention is given to the Industrial
Revolution for the secondary sector.
Finally, the economic changes in Spanish society are discussed.
The aim of the unit is that pupils know how to value the different
professions which improve the daily life of citizens. To do this, the
jobs of the pupils’ parents are taken into account.
62
Unit 4
Complementary material
►► Social Science 5 Workbook. Unit 4
Unit Resources
Digital resources
Teacher’s Resources on USB
and at www.smconectados.es
Other materials
Pupil’s Resources on CD and
at www.smsaviadigital.com
Teacher’s materials
Pupil’s materials
Unit 4. The economy and
its sectors
Diagnostic activity.
The economy
Tune up. What do
you know about ...?
Presentation. The
economic agents
1. The economic system
Let’s practise. The
economic agents
Let’s understand.
The supply chain
of fruit
Let’s play and learn.
The economic sectors
Let’s practise. The
primary sector
Reinforcement. Worksheet 1
WB page 34
2. The economic sectors
3. The primary sector
WB page 35-36
Reinforcement. Worksheet 2
WB page 37
Presentation. The
Industrial Revolution
Presentation.
Secondary sector
Fun fact! The
Industrial Revolution
inventions
Let’s understand.
The Industrial
Revolution
Presentation.
Primary sector
4. The secondary and tertiary sectors
Reinforcement. Worksheet 3
WB page 38
5. People in an economy
Extension. Worksheet 1
WB page 39
Presentation.
Mind map
Review
Review unit 4.
Assessment unit 4
Test yourself. Selfevaluation
Skills
Assessment. Rubric
Final task
Test yourself. Check
the way you have
learnt
Unit 4
63
Teaching programme
UNIT AIMS
COMPETENCES
1. Know the basic characteristics of economic activity.
2. Understand what economic agents are and why they are important.
3. Understand the characteristics of the various economic sectors.
4. Describe the production process from the extraction of raw materials to
marketing.
5. Value the importance of all professions regardless of their remuneration.
6. Apply mathematical skills to interpret different types of numeric information,
graphs etc.
7. Carry out group work on the unit content.
Social and civic competence
(Aims 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5)
Mathematical competence and basic competence in science and technology
(Aim 6)
Linguistic communication
(Aims 8 and 9)
Competence in learning to learn
(Aim 7)
Digital competence
(Aim 10)
8. Define the concepts related to the unit.
9. Develop written texts about the unit content.
10. Use new technologies to complete activities.
64
contents
assesSment criteria
learning standards
Gathering information on the subject
using different sources.
1. Obtain specific, significant
information about previously defined
events and phenomena, using
different sources.
1.1. Find, select and organise specific,
significant information. Analyse it,
reach conclusions, reflect on the
process and communicate orally or
in writing.
(Competence in learning to learn)
(Linguistic communication)
• Complete activities using sources of
information such as images.
Activities: pages 63, 66 and 73
Developing strategies to organise,
memorise and retrieve information
obtained using different methods and
sources.
2. Learn and use strategies for
developing responsibility, the ability
to work hard and perseverance with
regard to schoolwork.
2.1. Apply strategies for developing
responsibility, the ability to work
hard and perseverance with regard
to schoolwork.
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Engage in self-assessment and learn
the relationship between effort and
results.
All of the activities
Using information and
communications technology (ICT) to
search for and select information.
Presenting conclusions.
3. With guidance, use information and
communications technology to obtain
information and learn to express
content.
3.1. Use information and
communications technology to
complete assignments using
terminology appropriate to the
subjects.
(Digital competence)
• Use ICT as a tool for learning and
self-assessment.
Interactive activities on
Saviadigital, pages 63, 64, 65, 67,
69, 73 and 76.
Unit 4
learning outcomes
Teaching programme
contents
assesSment criteria
learning standards
learning outcomes
The economic system. The
economic circular flow. The factors
of production.
4. Identify the activities that
belong to each of the
economic sectors, describe
their characteristics and
recognise the main economic
activities in Spain and Europe.
4.1. Describe the characteristics of the economic
sectors and specify the main activities of each.
(Linguistic communication)
4.2. Explain the activities of the primary, secondary
and tertiary sectors in Spain.
(Social and civic competence)
• Analyse which sector various
activities belong to.
Activities: pages 65, 71, 72, 73
and 76.
• List activities of each sector.
Activities: page 73
5. Compare how the population
is distributed in each of the
economic sectors in Spain,
explaining similarities and
differences.
5.1. Explain how the population is distributed in
each of the economic sectors in Spain.
(Linguistic communication)
5.2. Interpret simple graphs showing the population
employed in the service sector in Spain.
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
• Analyse the distribution of
population by sectors.
Activities: page 69, 71 and 73
• Analyse sectorial graphs.
Activity: page 73
6. Explain the characteristics in
today’s world of
communications, transport
and new economic activities
related to the production of
goods and services specifying
the changes these have made
for people.
6.1. Describe which activities offer services to
society.
(Linguistic communication)
6.2. Explain how the introduction of new economic
activities linked to the production of goods and
services has brought changes to human life.
(Social and civic competence)
• Identify activities from the tertiary
sector.
Skills, page 74.
• Understand the process of
manufacture and marketing of
products.
Final task, page 74
The economic sectors. Primary,
secondary, tertiary. Suppliers,
businesses and consumers.
People in an economy. Changes in
Spain’s economy.
Unit 4
65
Teaching programme
Methodological suggestions
1. Previous knowledge
Based on the curriculum, most of the concepts covered in this unit were already studied by the pupils in Social Science
during previous years:
• Work and economic activities.
• Distribution of the population into sectors.
• Relating activities with productive sectors.
2. Possible areas of difficulty
Pupils may encounter some difficulties when studying this unit, especially with regard to the following aspects:
• The concept of economic agents as these are quite abstract ideas.
• Lastly, pupils may also have difficulty assimilating and differentiating the production factors.
3. Innovation programmes
Cooperative learning
Each unit includes suggested dynamics for working on cooperative learning. These dynamics are developed in the Cooperative Learning Guide,
included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Learning to think
Each unit offers the possibility of using the language and contents learnt through a series of activities related to the topic. Pupils develop
thinking strategies to work through the different content covered in the units. These suggestions are fully developed in the Learning to Think
Guide.
Values
The importance of valuing the work of others. All jobs contribute to the development of society. It is important to appreciate how everyone’s
work helps improve all of our daily lives.
4. Suggested distribution of sessions
For the development of this unit, we recommend dividing the work into eleven sessions, organised as follows:
INTRODUCTION
content
REVIEW
SKILLS
Final task
1 session
5 sessions
2 sessions
2 sessions
1 session
The above session recommendations are intended as a guide. Each teacher should adapt the recommendations based on
their needs and the number of classroom hours allocated.
66
Unit 4
Multiple intelligences
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
●
Comprehensive listening
●
Individual reading
●
Acquiring and using new vocabulary
INTRAPERSONAL
●
●
elf-evaluation and metacognition
S
exercises
ctivities involving oral and written
A
expression of ideas and emotions
LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL
●
Reading and using graphic organisers
●
Using numbering in everyday activities
●
INTERPERSONAL
Analysing statistical data and numerical
facts
●
●
Multiple
intelligences
Creative projects and group research
sing cooperative learning techniques
U
to work as structured groups
NATURALISTIC
VISUAL-SPATIAL
●
Reading and interpreting images
●
Creating charts and diagrams
●
●
bserving images from the natural
O
world
Applying the scientific method
BODILY-KINAESTHETIC
●
anufacturing and inventing models
M
linked to concepts, ideas or processes
Unit 4
67
Audioscript
22
These are elements needed in the production of olive
oil:
- Olive trees for their fruit.
- Olive pickers to pick the olives.
- Water to clean the olives.
- Olive presses to extract the oil.
- A production manager to watch over the production
process.
- The entrepreneur who brings the rest of the factors
together.
Answer key
1.
Land
Labour
Capital
olive trees
water
olive pickers
a production manager
an entrepreneur
olive presses
2. Open answer.
3. The state’s income comes from taxes.
4. The taxi is a capital good because it is used to offer a
service and the normal car is a consumer good because it
is produced to be sold.
5. Open answer.
68
Unit 4
Audioscript
23
1. Transport belongs to the secondary sector.
2. Farmers work in the primary sector.
3. The raw material in this process is corn.
4. The manufactured products in this process are tortilla
chips.
5. People don’t work in the secondary sector, only
machines do.
Answer key
1. 1) False
2) True
3) True
4) False
5) False
2. Open answer.
3. Land: corn crops
Labour: crop farmers, factory workers, hauliers,
shopkeeper
Capital: tractor, factory, machinery, lorries, shops
4. Picking cotton: primary sector
Making T-shirts: secondary sector
Transporting T-shirts to a shop: secondary sector
Selling T-shirts: tertiary sector
6. The three economic sectors.
7. Suppliers and producers.
8. Businesses buy the raw materials they need from the
suppliers. They make the product and package it. The
candy bars are transported to supermarkets.
8. Open answer.
Unit 4
69
Audioscript
24
1. minerals
2. wood and cork
3. fish and seafood
4. crops and livestock
Answer key
1. silviculture: wood and cork
fishing: fish and seafood
mining: minerals
farming: crops and livestock
2. a) rain-fed
b) rain-fed
c) irrigated
d) rain-fed
3. Livestock farming: milk, meat, eggs
Crop farming: olives, apples, lettuce
Mining: petrol, coal
Silviculture: wood
Fishing: fish
4. Open answer.
70
Unit 4
Answer key
Fun fact! Suggested answer: Thomas Newcomen invented
the first steam engine in 1712, James Hargreaves
invented the spinning jenny in 1764, Samuel Morse
invented the telegraph in 1844 and Elias Howe invented
the sewing machine in 1846.
1. telephone: second phase
first affordable car: second phase
mechanical spinning frame: first phase
Internet: third phase
2. Open answer.
3. They mostly worked before in primary and secondary and
nowaday they mostly worked in tertiary sector.
4. Open answer.
Unit 4
71
Audioscript
25
72
GAME SHOW HOST: It’s that time everyone! Time to
play... Name that job!
GAME SHOW HOST: Hi, what’s your name?
CONTESTANT 1: Bob!
GAME SHOW HOST: So, what do you do Bob?
CONTESTANT 1: I work with my hands. I craft bags and
shoes out of leather.
GAME SHOW HOST: That’s great, thank you, Bob!
Contestant number 2, What do you do?
CONTESTANT 2: Hi! I’m Dana and I fly passengers to
and from different countries.
GAME SHOW HOST: Very interesting! Thank you! And
now for our last contestant. Hi, what’s your name?
CONTESTANT 3: Hi, my name’s Carl. I work 500 metres
underground extracting coal.
Unit 4
Answer key
1. Bob: leather worker: secondary sector
Carl: coal miner: primary sector
Dana: pilot: tertiary sector
2. Open answer.
3. Open answer.
1
4
2
5
3
6
8
7
9
Audioscript
26
1. Hi! I’m Alan. I was a teacher for over thirty years!
Now, I’m 70 and I can relax and fish all day!
2. I’m Jenna. I think it is important to help people. I’m
donating blood for people that are ill. I like being a
volunteer.
3. Tom works as a skilled worker in a steel mill.
Lorry driver: secondary sector
Footballer: tertiary sector
Construction worker: secondary sector
7. a) Alan is retired. He is part of the inactive population.
b) Jenna is a volunteer. She is a non-paid worker.
c) Tom is part of the active population.
8. 1) c; 2) b; 3) a; 4) c; 5) b
a) Most workers had low-skilled jobs.
b) Most people worked in fields or factories.
c) Robots and computers became an important part of
the assembly process.
Answer key
1. 1) agents; 2) households; 3) services; 4) sectors; 5)
primary; 6) secondary; 7) tertiary; 8) farmers; 9)
construction
2. a) goods; services
b) primary; raw
c) industries; construction
d) products; services
3. He is a craftsman who works in the secondary sector. He
transforms a raw material, wood, into a product, guitars.
4. They are people, companies, or organisations that have
an influence on the economy by producing, buying, or
selling goods or services. They include households,
businesses and the state.
5. Land, labour and capital.
6. Lawyer: tertiary sector
Miner: primary sector
9. a) The primary sector is the colour green. It includes crop
and animal farmers.
b) The secondary sector is the colour purple. People in
this sector work in industries and construction.
c) The tertiary sector is the colour yellow. It is made up of
goods and services businesses.
10.
Obtain products
Offer services
carpenter
potter
crop farmer
architect
fisherman
postal worker
street cleaner
hairdresser
11. Open answer.
Unit 4
73
Answer key
1. Open answer.
2.1) daily
2) products
3) digital
4) longer
5) robots
6) technology
7) careers
8) environment
9) natural
10) man-made
3.1) A
2) C
3) C
4) C
74
Unit 4
Notes
Unit 4
75
5
Money and business
This unit aims to determine the reasons why money was created. It
also explains the basic characteristics of the consumer society and
the basic guidelines of how a company works.
Firstly, it explains what money is and the many uses it has. Next,
the importance of consumerism for the economy and the society
of a country is discussed, while at the same time recognising the
difference between responsible and irresponsible spending. The
latter can lead to increased prices for some products.
The third section explains what a company is and what it is like,
the different types of company that exist and why it is important
that companies realise the responsibility they have to their
employees and to society as a whole.
The last section of the unit tackles the difference between
spending and saving, and tries to give a clear explanation that the
students will understand.
The main theme throughout the unit is the importance of
responsible consumer habits in order to establish fair trade
between countries and to protect the environment.
76
Unit 5
Complementary material
►► Social Science 5 Workbook. Unit 5
Unit resources
Digital resources
Teacher’s Resources on USB
and at www.smconectados.es
Other materials
Pupil’s Resources on CD and
at www.smsaviadigital.com
Teacher’s materials
Pupil’s materials
Unit 5.
Money and business
Diagnostic activity.
Money
Tune up What do
you know about ...?
Let’s understand.
The history of money
Fun fact! Currencies
of the world
1. Money
WB page 44
2. Market
Let’s understand.
How a multinational
works
Reinforcement. Worksheet 1
3. Business
WB page 45
Reinforcement. Worksheet 2
WB page 46
Presentation.
Consumption
4. Consumers
Reinforcement. Worksheet 3
Extension. Worksheet 1
WB page 47
Presentation.
Mind map
Review
Review unit 5
Assessment unit 5
Assessment term 2
Test yourself. Selfevaluation
Skills
Assessment. Rubric
Let’s understand.
How to start a
business
Test yourself. Check
the way you have
learnt
Final task
Unit 5
77
Teaching programme
UNIT AIMS
COMPETENCES
1. Know the basic characteristics of the consumer society.
Social and civic competence
(Aims 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5)
2. Understand what money is and what it is for.
3. Know the basic features of macroeconomics.
4. Evaluate responsibility in spending and saving and develop responsible
consumer habits.
5. Understand the workings of a company and its social role.
6. Apply mathematical skills to interpret and make different types of graphs.
7. Define the concepts related to the unit.
Mathematical competence and basic competence in science and technology
(Aim 6)
Linguistic communication
(Aims 7 and 8)
Competence in learning to learn
(Aim 7)
Digital competence
(Aim 9)
8. Develop written texts about the unit content.
9. Use new technologies to complete activities.
78
contents
assesSment criteria
learning standards
Gathering information on the subject
using different sources.
1. Obtain specific, significant
information about previously defined
events and phenomena, using
different sources.
1.1. Find, select and organise specific,
significant information. Analyse it,
reach conclusions, reflect on the
process and communicate orally or
in writing.
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Compile information from different
sources and interpret it.
Activities: pages 86 and 87
Using information and
communications technology to search
for and select information. Presenting
conclusions.
2. With guidance, use information and
communications technology to
complete assignments using
terminology appropriate to the
subjects.
2.1. Use information and
communications technology to
complete assignments using
terminology appropriate to the
subjects.
(Digital competence)
• Use ICT as a tool for learning and
self-assessment.
Interactive activities on Saviadigital,
pages 79, 82, 87 and 90
Using and reading different textual
and graphic languages, with guidance
and simple models.
3. Complete individual and group
assignments, developing the ability
to work hard as part of the learning
process.
3.1. Complete group assignments,
demonstrating a responsible and
respectful attitude.
3.1. Complete individual and group
assignments and presentations that
involve looking for, selecting and
interpreting texts.
(Linguistic communication)
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Participate actively in completing
group assignments.
Final task, page 90
Unit 5
learning outcomes
Teaching programme
contents
assesSment criteria
Finance education. Money. Saving.
4. Be aware of the value of
money and its uses through
responsible consumerism and
savings.
4.1. Differentiate between different types of
expenses and adapt the budget accordingly.
(Social and civic competence)
4.2. Plan their savings for future expenses,
developing a small personal budget.
(Mathematical competence and basic
competence in science and technology)
• Distinguish between fixed costs,
variable costs, necessary and
unnecessary expenses.
Activities: pages 78, 79, 81, 85, 87
• Develop and fix real and fictitious
budgets.
Activities: pages 89 and 90
Employability and entrepreneurial
spirit. The company.
5. Understand the benefits of
entrepreneurship.
5.1.Develop creativity and value the
entrepreneurship of members of society.
(Sense of initiative and entrepreneurial spirit)
• Understand the importance of
entrepreneurship and value
business initiative.
Activities: pages 82, 87 and 88
6. Explain the essential
characteristics of a company,
specifying the various
activities and ways of
organisation between
different types of company.
6.1. Identify different types of company based on
their size and the economic sector to which
they belong and what they do.
(Social and civic competence)
6.2. Describe various forms of business
organisation.
(Social and civic competence)
6.3. Define simple terms related to the world of
business and economics, illustrating the
definitions with examples.
(Linguistic communication)
• Distinguish between small
companies and multinationals.
Activities: page 87
• Understand the basic process of
business operations.
Activities: pages 82, 87, 89 and 90
• Define concepts related to the
economy.
Activities: pages 78, 81, 85
Small and big companies.
Ways of organisation in companies
learning standards
learning outcomes
Unit 5
79
Teaching programme
Methodological suggestions
1. Previous knowledge
Based on the curriculum, most of the concepts covered in this unit were already studied by the pupils in Social Science on
during previous years:
• Money.
• Business.
• Sales.
• Savings.
2. Possible areas of difficulty
Pupils may encounter some difficulties when studying this unit, especially with regard to the following aspects:
• The market, how it works and the reason for it may be confusing for students of this age. The same can be said of
concepts such as inflation or the trust value of money. It is necessary to pay special attention to these sophisticated
concepts.
• The activities with mathematical content are complex, so it is best to be aware that they may prove to be an added
difficulty for the students.
• Obviously, the unit content carries implicit deep ideological connotations. It would be interesting to consider this with
the pupils so that they can develop a critical and balanced point of view, and adapt it to the content.
3. Innovation programmes
Cooperative learning
Each unit includes suggested dynamics for working on cooperative learning. These dynamics are developed in the Cooperative Learning Guide,
included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Learning to think
Each unit offers the possibility of using the language and contents learnt through a series of activities related to the topic. Pupils develop
thinking strategies to work through the different content covered in the units. These suggestions are fully developed in the Learning to Think
Guide.
Values
The importance of responsible consumption. As consumers, we are able to choose ethically produced or fair trade products.
4. Suggested distribution of sessions
For the development of this unit, we recommend dividing the work into ten sessions, organised as follows:
Introduction
content
review
skills
Final task
1 session
4 sessions
2 sessions
2 sessions
1 session
The above session recommendations are intended as a guide. Each teacher should adapt the recommendations based on
their needs and the number of classroom hours allocated.
80
Unit 5
Multiple intelligences
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
●
Creative writing
●
Acquiring and using new vocabulary
INTRAPERSONAL
●
●
elf-evaluation and metacognition
S
exercises
Critical and creative thinking activities
LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL
●
●
nalysing statistical data and numerical
A
facts
INTERPERSONAL
Logical reasoning
●
●
Multiple
intelligences
Creative projects and group research
sing cooperative learning techniques
U
to work as structured groups
NATURALISTIC
VISUAL-SPATIAL
●
Reading and interpreting images
●
Creating charts and diagrams
●
Applying the scientific method
BODILY-KINAESTHETIC
●
anufacturing and inventing models
M
linked to concepts, ideas or processes
Unit 5
81
Audioscript
27
1.
WOMAN: That’s €45.60.
2.
MAN: I’ll give you three sheep for one cow.
WOMAN: Make that four sheep.
MAN: OK, it’s a deal.
3.
MAN: Is there anything else you need?
WOMAN: No, thank you! Here you are!
MAN: Use it carefully with your food.
4.
MAN 1: Roman soldier, here is your salary for the month!
MAN 2: Thank you, my centurion.
5.
MAN: That is a total of 50 gold coins. The Stockholms
Banco guarantees repayment of the banknotes in
cash. Signature: Johan Palmstruch, founder of
Stockholms Banco. Stockholm. 1661. Thank you, sir,
for trusting our bank.
82
Unit 5
Answer key
Fun fact! There are many different currencies. Some of them
are the dollar, the euro, the pound and the peso.
1. 1) credit card
2) bartering
3) salt
4) ancient coins
5) early banknotes
2. money: something used as a way to pay for goods and
services and to pay people for their work.
currency: the specific money that a country uses.
coin: a piece of metal used as money.
3. a) The government establishes the value of coins and
banknotes.
b) In early banking, banknotes represented real money
that people deposited.
4. a) a way to store value
b) a medium of exchange
c) an unit of account
5. barter: people exchanged goods they had for other
goods.
shells: people used them as a medium of exchange.
early banknotes: they were a receipt in the form of a
piece of paper that represented real money that people
deposited in a bank.
fiat money: it does not have real value itself because
goverments establish how much it is worth.
Audioscript
28
1. Your electricity and milk are not basic consumer
goods.
2. A growing economy has an inflation that increases
little by little.
3. Supply and demand refers to prices based on how
much of a product there is and how many people
want it.
4. If demand is high, prices are low.
5. If supply is high, prices are low.
Answer key
Fun fact! Because inflation rose so much that money wasn’t
worth almost anything.
1. 1) False; 2) True; 3) True; 4) False; 5) True
2. consumers: generally speaking, consumers buy less of a
good when prices are high. It the price is too high, the
demand falls and prices can decrease.
producers: generally speaking, when the demand is high,
they can charge high prices for goods because they try to
obtain the greatest possible profit.
advertising: it can create the desire for a good or service
in consumers, so that demand goes up and producers
offer this good or service at higher prices.
3. Governments observe the prices of the basic consumer
goods every year to stop inflation from growing too
much.
4. If inflation rises too much in a very short time, people’s
salaries and pensions are not enough to buy goods and
services.
If inflation falls too much in a very short time, companies
don’t obtain enough money to pay salaries to workers.
5. a) The price will be high.
b) The price will be low.
6. Open answer.
Unit 5
83
Audioscript
29
1. I’m an engineer. I design cars for a car company.
2. I’m an accountant. I’m in charge of organising my
company’s bank loans and payments.
3. I’m in charge of training new employees.
4. I’m a factory worker. I build refrigerators.
5. I work in advertising. I’m in charge of my company’s
image and trademark.
Answer key
1. 1) Research and Development
2) Finance
3) Human Resources
4) Production
5) Marketing
2. A business is any organisation that makes goods or
provides services in exchange for money. Its goal it is to
make goods or services that fulfill the demands of
consumers.
3. Businesses contribute to society by providing products,
creating jobs and paying taxes.They should protect and
respect their employees’ rights and the environment.
4. Open answer.
84
Unit 5
Audioscript
30
1. Oh no, not my car ...!
2. I’m so excited about the concert! I’ve been waiting
for months!
3. Just relax, Mr. Smith. We’ll fix that broken tooth!
4. Miss Cameron, I’m the landlord, your rent is due.
5. Happy Birthday, Bridgette! Here’s a present for you! I
hope you like it!
Answer key
Fun fact! Money would be worth less and less.
1. 1) unexpected expense
2) variable expense
3) unexpected expense
4) fixed expense
5) variable expense
2. a) unexpected expense
b) variable expense
c) fixed expense
d) variable expense
3. Bank loans allow consumers to pay unexpected
expenses.
4. a) credit
b) deposit
5. A current account is an account for managing the
day-to-day money.
A savings account is an account where an individual
deposits his or her savings.
6. Fixed expenses.
7. A debt income ratio is the percentage of a consumer’s
monthly income used to pay debts.
8. €2,625 monthly.
Unit 5
85
1
2
3
4
6
5
7
Audioscript
31
1. Ancient coins, credit cards, fiat money, trade, shells.
2. Market, supply, demand, fiat money, consumers,
producers.
3. SMEs, LLC, multinational companies, marketing, sole
traders.
4. Fixed expenses, paying on credit, inflation, savings
account.
Answer key
1. 1) indicate the value of things; 2) supply; 3) inflation; 4)
unexpected; 5) bank; 6) self-employed; 7) large
2. a) Money can be used for buying, saving and indicating
the value of things.
b) Expenses can be fixed, variable or unexpected.
c) Businesses with less than 250 employees are called
small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).
3. bartering: the exchange of things (such as products or
services) for other things instead of for money.
savings: the amount of money that you have kept over a
period of time.
business: the activity of making, buying, or selling goods
or services in exchange for money
4. a) self-employed; b) fixed expenses; c) unit of value; d)
supply and demand; e) basic consumer goods; f) inflation
5. 1) trade; 2) fiat money; 3) marketing; 4) inflation
86
Term 2
6. a) unexpected
b) variable
7. 1) a
2) c
3) b
4) a
5) a
8. Open answer.
9. a) Governments.
b) €30.
10. The main differences are the number of workers and that
multinational companies work in different countries.
They should both follow the same ethics, but it is true
that multinational companies have more responsibility
because they employ more workers and their impact on
the environment is bigger.
11. a) True
b) True
c) False
12. They belong to a large enterprise.
The first picture is related to the production department
and the second one is related to the marketing
department.
Answer key
1. 1) who
2) kind
3) which
4) develops
5) make
6) with
7) sells
8) teaches
9) of
10) recycled
2. 1) A
2) C
3) A
4) B
5) B
3. Open answer.
Term 2
87
Answer key
Answer key
1. 1) A
2) C
3) C
4) C
5) A
6) C
7) C
8) A
9) A
10) B
Lost professions
1) Pine tappers belong to the primary sector, since they
directly obtain raw materials from nature; whereas
blacksmiths belong to the secondary sector, because they
turn iron into manufactured products.
2) These professions are coming back in an attempt to
restore traditional craftsmanship, which was on the verge
of disappearing, because these professions are essential,
and have a great cultural value.
3) Open answer.
Economic cycles
1) A growth in employment entails more people working;
thus earning a salary. As a result, those people are
consumers with more money to spend on different
products, and this leads to increased consumption.
2) Open answer. You should foster a dialogue in the
classroom, giving examples of situations for the different
‘seasons’ of economy while analysing the specific factors
and circumstances of pupils: family members who are
working, unemployed, who have just been laid off, those
with an entrepreneurial spirit, etc.
88
Term 2
Answer key
Answer key
Loving ice cream made them rich!
The birth of Banks
Storing your savings in a piggy bank is a domestic saving;
your money is kept at home and its value reduces on a
yearly basis due to inflation. That’s why it’s not advisable to
store your money in a piggy bank for a lengthy period of
time. On the other hand, savings banks pay interest on your
savings; in other words, extra money will be deposited to
your account as a result of keeping your money at that bank.
Ice-cream making belongs to the secondary sector, because
it turns raw material into a manufactured product; while
transport belongs to the tertiary sector, since it provides a
delivery service, from the factory to supermarkets, to sell
the product to consumers.
Green businesses
Some examples are transport companies using electric
vehicles for public transport such as buses, and waste
recycling companies which are regarded as green.
Marco Polo and paper Money
Coins are used to pay small amounts of money; notes are
used to pay larger sums of money.
The current population
The origin of credit cards
Suggested answer: I would apologise and try to contact
someone who could come to pay for my meal. Then, I would
thank that person and pay them back.
Odd money
Credit or debit cards, bank cheques, online shopping, etc.
People go to cities seeking jobs, because most businesses
are located in cities, which have a greater population and
provide a wide range of services regarding education,
health, etc. Villages, however, are less populated and less
polluted: life there is healthier and not so hectic.
Term 2
89
6
The Middle Ages
This unit begins by introducing the concept of the Middle Ages and
explaining its chronology as the main feature that defines this period.
The following section discloses how the Iberian Peninsula was
organised in the early centuries of the period, the formation of the
Visigothic kingdom of Toledo, the arrival of the Muslims later and
the creation of an Islamic territory called al-Andalus.
Subsequently, the Christian Kingdoms emerged in northern
peninsular areas not occupied by Muslims. They are presented and
their main characteristics are explained. The process by which
these kingdoms moved towards the south is known as the
Reconquista.
The unit revolves around the concept of equal or unequal societies
in order to tie everything together, and this concept is also linked
to the final task about medieval society. The purpose is to make
pupils understand what people’s lives were like by connecting this
period of time to their lives nowadays.
90
Unit 6
Complementary material
►► Social Science 5 Workbook. Unit 6
Unit Resources
Digital resources
Teacher’s Resources on USB
and at www.smconectados.com
Diagnostic activity.
The Middle Ages
Other materials
Pupil’s Resources on CD and
at www.smsaviadigital.com
Tune up. What do
you know about ...?
Presentation. The
Middle Ages timeline
Teacher’s materials
Pupil’s materials
Unit 6.
The Middle Ages
1. The Middle Ages
Map. The Iberian Peninsula in the Middle Ages
Cut-outs. The Middle Ages
WB page 52
Who was…? Visigoth
kings
Activity. Medieval
Muslim and Christian
cities
Web link. Islamic
History of Europe
2. Visigoths in the Iberian Peninsula
3. al-Andalus
Who was…? The first
caliph of Córdoba
Presentation. The
Reconquista
WB page 53
Reinforcement. Worksheet 3
WB page 54
4. The Reconquista in the Iberian
Peninsula
WB page 55
5. The Christian Kingdoms in the
Iberian Peninsula
Reinforcement. Worksheet 1, 2
Map. The Way of Saint James
Let’s understand.
Medieval art styles
Let’s play and learn.
Time travel
WB page 56
6. Feudalism in the Iberian Peninsula
Let’s practise. Fiefs
and boroughs
WB page 57
7. Art and culture in the Middle Ages
Presentation.
Medieval society
Assessment. Rubric
Poster. The medieval city
Let’s practise.
Romanesque and
gothic styles
Extension. Worksheet 1
WB pages 58-59
Review
Review unit 6.
Assessment unit 6
Test yourself. Selfevaluation
Skills
Presentation.
Medieval society
Assessment. Rubric
Final task
Test yourself. Check
the way you have
learnt
Flashcards and word cards available in the Classroom Box to support the target language.
Unit 6
91
Teaching programme
OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIT
COMPETENCES
1. Learn the essential characteristics of the Middle Ages in Europe and on the
Iberian Peninsula.
Social and civic competence
(Aims 1, 2, 5 and 8)
2. Identify the social, political, economic and cultural features of each of the
civilisations of the period.
Linguistic communication
(Aims 1, 2, 7 and 8)
3. Put the different periods and main events of the Middle Ages in chronological
order.
4. Recognise the main examples of artistic expression found during the period
and describe their most characteristic features.
5. Appreciate the importance of the social model established on the peninsula
during the Middle Ages as an example of coexistence among different
cultures.
Mathematical competence and basic competence in science and technology
(Aim 3)
Cultural awareness and expression
(Aim 4)
Competence in learning to learn
(Aim 6)
Digital competence
(Aim 9)
6. Complete individual and group assignments on specific aspects of the unit.
7. Define concepts related to the unit.
8. Prepare written texts on the unit content.
9. Use new technologies to carry out activities.
contents
assesSment criteria
learning standards
learning outcomes
Introduction to scientific knowledge
and its use in the social sciences.
1. Obtain specific, significant
information about previously defined
events and phenomena, using
different sources (direct and
indirect).
1.1. Find, select and organise specific,
significant information. Analyse it,
reach conclusions, reflect on the
process and communicate orally
and/or in writing.
(Linguistic communication)
• Complete activities using maps and
images as sources of information.
ActIvities: pages 79, 91, 98 and 100
• Research a previously defined event
using different sources.
Activities: pages 79 and 98
Developing strategies to organise,
memorise and retrieve information
obtained using different methods and
sources.
2. Develop responsibility, the ability to
work hard and perseverance with
regard to schoolwork.
2.1. Complete the assigned tasks and
submit clear, neat and organised work.
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Complete tasks in a clear, neat and
organised manner.
Activities: pages 79 and 98
Using information and
communications technology (ICT) to
search for and select information.
Presenting conclusions.
3. With guidance, use ICT to obtain
information and learn to express
content.
3.1. Use ICT to complete assignments
using terminology appropriate to
the subjects.
(Digital competence)
• Use ICT as a tool for learning and
self-assessment.
Activities on Saviadigital,
Activities: pages 83, 84, 85, 87,
89, 91 and 93
The main periods and events of the
Middle Ages.
4. Identify the key events in the history
of Spain. Locate them in space and
time.
4.1. Locate the key events in the
history of medieval Spain in space
and time.
(Social and civic competence)
• Learn about the main periods of the
Middle Ages.
Activities: pages 80 and 81
The Germanic invasions and the
Visigothic Kingdom.
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Unit 6
Teaching programme
contents
assesSment criteria
learning standards
5. Describe the most important
historical periods of medieval Europe
and the Iberian Peninsula.
5.1. Situate the most important
historical periods of the medieval
Iberian Peninsula on a timeline:
Visigoth Kingdom, al-Andalus and
the Christian Kingdoms.
(Mathematical competence and
basic competence in science and
technology)
• Learn about the Visigothic Kingdom
in the Iberian Peninsula.
Activities: pages 82 and 83
5.2. Show the main historical events
relating to al-Andalus on a
timeline.
(Mathematical competence and
basic competence in science and
technology)
• Interpret the timeline for al-Andalus.
Activities: pages 83 and 84
5.3. Locate the main historical events
relating to the Christian kingdoms
on a timeline.
(Social and civic competence)
• Understand the territorial evolution
of the Christian kingdoms.
Activities: pages 88 and 89
6. Explain the influence of Arab
civilisation in Spain. Describe its
artistic, cultural and economic
legacy.
6.1. Describe the artistic, cultural and
economic legacy of al-Andalus.
(Social and civic competence)
• Identify different characteristics of
the culture of al-Andalus.
Activities: pages 83 and 84
7. Explain the process of the
Reconquista, associating it with the
social and political structure of the
Christian kingdoms.
7.1. Explain the process of the
Reconquista and resettlement of
the Christian kingdoms.
(Linguistic communication)
(Cultural awareness and
expression)
• Understand the territorial and
cultural evolution of the Christian
kingdoms through the Reconquista.
Activities: pages 87 and 88
7.2. Describe the importance of the
Way of Saint James.
(Cultural awareness and
expression)
• Understand the cultural and artistic
significance of the Way of Saint
James.
Activities: page 93
7.3. Explain how society was organised
in the Middle Ages and its
relationship with land ownership
as a symbol of power.
(Social and civic competence)
• Observe the differences in the feudal
pyramid.
Activities: page 98
8.1. Explain the importance of the
coexistence of the three cultures as
an element which enriched Spanish
culture.
(Social and civic competence)
• Appreciate the importance of tolerant
coexistence among various cultures.
Activities: pages 87 and 88
8.2. Identify the different
characteristics of the Early Middle
Ages and the Late Middle Ages.
(Social and civic competence)
(Cultural awareness and
expression)
• Understand what life was like in
a medieval fief and a medieval
borough.
Activities: pages 90 and 91
Al-Andalus: political development,
economy, social organisation,
traditions, religion, culture, sciences
and art. Cultural legacy.
The Christian Kingdoms: origins and
formation, the Reconquista and
resettlement, social organisation, the
Way of Saint James, art and culture.
Coexistence of three cultures: Muslim,
Jewish and Christian.
8. Describe the unique features of the
three cultures: Muslim, Jewish and
Christian.
learning outcomes
Unit 6
93
Teaching programme
Methodological suggestions
1. Previous knowledge
Based on the curriculum, most of the concepts covered in this unit will be new to the pupils. However, there are some
concepts which they may already be familiar with, either from their earlier education or by learning about them from
books, films, television series, etc.
• The concept of the Middle Ages.
• The periods of the Middle Ages and the milestones that mark its beginning and end.
• The different cultures that coincided on the peninsula, especially the Christian and Muslim.
• The main features of different ways of life in the Middle Ages: knights and castles, peasants, monks, etc.
• Recognising cathedrals as typical structures found during the medieval period.
2. Possible areas of difficulty
Despite having some previous knowledge, pupils may encounter some of the following difficulties when studying this
unit, especially in relation to:
• The fact that different cultures coincided on the peninsula during the Middle Ages makes it necessary to dispense with
traditional chronological sequencing. The jumps in time required to present the content may lead to a certain degree of
confusion in the pupils.
• Additionally, the use of maps on which information about different periods is superimposed, especially the map of the
Reconquista, must be explained carefully. You should anticipate that the pupils will have difficulty understanding their
meaning.
• In the History workshop, pupils are asked to establish a relationship between historical cartography and the territorial
evolution of the main kingdoms. It is important to explain that the origins of many of today’s autonomous communities
lie in the medieval kingdoms, and also to establish the differences between the medieval period and the present day in
terms of political, industrial, economic and social aspects.
• Pupils will need to use specific vocabulary, especially when studying al-Andalus. This includes the terms Muladi,
Mudejar, Mozarab, etc., which may cause confusion.
3 Innovation programmes
Cooperative Learning
Each unit includes suggested dynamics for working on cooperative learning. These dynamics are developed in the Cooperative Learning Guide,
included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Learning to think
Each unit offers the possibility of using the language and contents learnt throughout a series of activities related to the topic. Pupils develop
thinking strategies to work through the different content covered in the units. These suggestions are fully developed in the Learning to Think
Guide.
Values
The importance of a society with equal rights. In medieval times, society was very unfair and many people suffered for that. Nowadays, there
are still examples of unfairness we must watch out for and avoid.
4. Suggested distribution of sessions
To complete this unit, we recommend dividing the work into twelve sessions, organised as follows:
Introduction
content
review
skills
Final task
1 session
6 sessions
2 sessions
2 sessions
1 session
The above session recommendations are intended as a guide. Each teacher should adapt the recommendations based on
their needs and the number of classroom hours allocated.
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Unit 6
Multiple intelligences
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
●
Comprehensive listening
●
Oral presentations
●
Learning new languages
●
Debating ideas
●
Acquiring and using new vocabulary
●
Role-playing games
INTRAPERSONAL
●
●
●
●
LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL
●
elf-evaluation and metacognition
S
exercises
Critical and creative thinking activities
I ndividual tasks where they can work
alone to express ideas and personal
opinions about content
ransference: learning how to apply the
T
subjects learnt in class
stablishing classifications,
E
comparisons and series
●
Reading sequences
●
Using numbering in everyday activities
●
Logical reasoning
●
Problem-solving
INTERPERSONAL
Multiple
intelligences
●
Conflict-solving dynamics
●
Practising empathy
●
Identifying other people’s feelings
VISUAL-SPATIAL
●
Reading and interpreting images
●
Making maps and routes
●
●
NATURALISTIC
●
ctive imagination and visualisation
A
activities
nderstanding the relation between
U
historical events and the environment
Analysing artworks
BODILY-KINAESTHETIC
●
●
cting out concepts: performing the
A
content that is being studied
Role-playing game
MUSICAL
●
uditory discrimination of musical
A
instruments and sounds in the
environment.
Unit 6
95
Answer key
1. Open answer.
2. Open answer.
3. Early Middle Ages: feudalism: agriculture
Late Middle Ages: city: commerce
4. El Cid lived in the Late Middle Ages.
96
Unit 6
Audioscript
32
1. What type of civilisation were the Visigoths?
2. What was the Roman agreement with the Visigoths?
3. What mountain range did the Germanic tribes cross
to enter the Iberian Peninsula?
4. Who forced the Visigoths back to Hispania?
5. When did the Visigoth’s create their Kingdom on the
Iberian Peninsula?
Answer key
Who was ...? Under the reign of Recaredo, Catholicism was
proclaimed as the official religion of the Visigothic
kingdom in Spain. Rodrigo was the last Visigothic king in
Spain.
1. 1) The Visigoths were a Germanic civilisation.
2) The Romans allowed the Visigoths to stay on Roman
land if they helped them fight against other Germanic
tribes.
3) The Germanic tribes crossed the Pyrenees to enter the
Iberian Peninsula.
4) The Franks forced the Visigoths back to Hispania.
5) The Visigoths created their Kingdom in 507.
2. Open answer.
3. Open answer.
4. It was an occupation because there wasn’t any war and
they were considered the successors of the Romans.
5. The Visigoths adopted the culture and the customs they
found in the peninsula.
King Leovigildo created a law with equal rights for both
Visigoths and Hispano-Romans.
6. • The Suebi, Vandals, Alans and Visigoths entered the
Western Roman Empire and settled down in the Iberian
peninsula.
• When they arrived, they found Cántabros, Vascones
and Hispano-Roman people.
7. Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar.
Unit 6
97
Audioscript
33
1. The Muslims were on the Iberian Peninsula for only
two centuries.
2. In 756, al-Andalus became the politically
independent emirate of Toledo.
3. In 722, the Christians stopped the Muslims from
advancing farther north in the Battle of Covadonga.
4. In the 11th century, al-Andalus divided into small
kingdoms called taifas.
5. By the 13th century, the Muslim empire began to fall.
Answer key
Who was ...? The first caliph of al-Andalus was Abd-arRahman III.
1. 1) False
2) False
3) True
4) True
5) True
2. Open answer.
3. Open answer.
4. • Andalucía. It evolved from the Arabic name that means
‘land of vandals’.
• Islam: the religion of the Muslims.
Muslim: a follower of Islam.
Arabic: the language of the Arabs.
Arab: a member of a group of people originally from the
Arabian Peninsula who now live mostly in the Middle
East and northern Africa.
Moor: a member of a group of North African Muslim
people who ruled parts of Spain from the 8th century
until 1492.
5. • The mosque was used for praying. The alcázar was
used as a fortified castle.
• Open answer.
7. El Cid was a Christian.
98
Unit 6
Audioscript
34
1. What was the name of the Muslim kingdom?
2. In what region of the Iberian Peninsula was alAndalus?
3. From which direction did the Christian kingdoms
advance?
4. In what year did the Christian Reconquista end?
5. Where was the last Nasrid kingdom that was
conquered in 1492?
Answer key
Fun fact! Principado de Asturias.
1. 1) Al-Andalus; 2) All the peninsula except the mountains
in the north; 3) Towards the south; 4) 1492; 5) Granada
2. 722: it corresponds to the Battle of Covadonga.
1492: it corresponds to the Reconquista of the last
Muslim territory by the Catholic Monarchs.
3. The Battle of Guadalete occurred in 711. The Visigoth
army was defeated by the Muslims. This victory allowed
the Muslims to continue their conquest of the peninsula.
The Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa occurred in 1212. It was
a victory for the Christian armies. It meant the beginning
of the end of the Muslim dominance over the peninsula.
The Battle of Covadonga took place in 722. It was the
first significant victory of the Christians over the Muslims
and marked the beginning of the Reconquista.
4. Open answer.
5. Mudejar Muslims: Muslims who stayed in Christian
territories but kept their religion.
Mozarabs: They were Christians who kept their religion
and lived in Muslim territory.
Muladis: These were Christians who converted to Islam
and lived in Muslim territory.
6. Open answer.
8. El Cid participated in the Reconquista of Valencia at the
end of 11th century.
Unit 6
99
Audioscript
35
1. They originally belonged to the Spanish March of the
Frankish Empire.
2. They joined in 1230 to become the Crown of Castilla.
3. It was the first Christian Kingdom and Pelayo was its
king.
4. It separated from the Kingdom of León in the middle
of the 12th century to become an independent
Kingdom.
5. King Sancho III el Mayor was its greatest king.
Answer key
Who was ...? Because it was the ancient capital of the
Visigothic Kingdom in Spain.
1. 1) Aragón and the Catalonian counties.
2) Kingdoms of León and Castilla.
3) Kingdom of Asturias.
4) Kingdom of Castilla.
5) Kingdom of Pamplona-Navarra.
2. Four: Kingdom of Portugal, Kingdom of Navarra and the
Crown of Castilla and Aragón.
3. El Cid lived in the Kingdom of Castilla and its kings were
Sancho II and Alfonso VI.
100
Unit 6
Audioscript
36
1. What social, economic and political system was used
in the Early Middle Ages?
2. What was the name of the land a nobleman received
from the king?
3. What were the new cities of the Late Middle Ages
called?
4. What was the new social group that lived in
boroughs?
5. Where did Jews and Muslims live in these medieval
cities?
Answer key
1. 1) Feudalism.
2) Fief.
3) Boroughs.
4) Bourgeoisie.
5) In Jewish and Muslim quarters.
2. 1) serfs
2) feudal lords
3) artisans and merchants (bourgeoisie)
4) knights and vassals
3. Open answer.
5. Men become knights because of war merits.
Knights were knighted by the King.
Unit 6
101
Answer key
1. Romance languages are the languages that evolved from
Vulgar Latin, which was the daily speech of the vulgar or
common people. Romance languages that exist today
are all the Iberian languages (except Basque), and as well
as Portuguese, French, Italian and Romanian.
2. Cantar de mio Cid was written in a Romance language,
which later gave rise to the current Spanish language. It
was composed around 1200.
3. The Romanesque and Gothic styles developed during the
Late Middle Ages.
102
Unit 6
Audioscript
37
BOY 1: Hey, what are you reading about?
BOY 2: Something for school. Listen to this: ‘The
Autonomous Community of Andalusia gets its
name from an Empire that lasted from the 8th to
15th centuries.’
BOY 1: Really?
BOY 2: Yes, it was Islamic and their religion was Islam.
BOY 1: Did they speak Arabic, too?
BOY 2: Yes, that was the official language. But people
from other religions also lived there and spoke their
own languages.
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
7
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Answer key
Mind map: 1) 5th; 2) 15th; 3) The Early Middle Ages and the
Late Middle Ages; 4) feudalism; 5) Germanic; 6) Toledo; 7)
8th; 8) 15th; 9) Islam; 10) Muslims; 11) Arabic; 12) Commerce;
13) numbers; 14) Visigoth; 15) north; 16) Reconquista;
17) Romance; 18) Gothic
1. a) In the Early Middle Ages, feudalism was the social,
economic and political system and in the Late Middle
Ages commerce increased again and the bourgeoisie
emerged in the cities. It was formed of artisans and
merchants. They were free and did not serve the feudal
lords.
b) The Visigoths entered the peninsula in the 5th
century. The Kingdom of Toledo lasted from 507 to 711.
c) Al-Andalus: mosque and alcázar. Christian kingdoms:
castle and cathedral.
2. The Visigoths: Germanic, Leovigildo, small stone church
al-Andalus: Mosque, Mozarab, souk, caliphate of
Córdoba
Christian kingdoms: Mudejar, Catalonian Counties,
cathedral, feudalism
How long did they stay?
Three centuries
Seven centuries
What was their language?
Latin
Arabic
What was their religion?
Catholicism
Islam
Name one of their rulers.
Leovigildo
Abd-al-Rahman III
5. a) The cathedral/church was the Christian place for
praying and learning.
b) The Visigoth Kingdom had its capital in Toledo.
c) True.
d) The discovery of America marked the end of the
Middle Ages.
e) Romanesque and Gothic styles developed in the
Christian Kingdoms.
6. Muslim invasion: 711; emirate of Córdoba: 756; caliphate
of Córdoba: 929; taifa kingdoms: 1031
7. Feudalism was the social, economic and political system
of the Early Middle Ages. Agriculture was the main
economic activity. A few feudal lords owned the fiefs.
The peasants worked in the feudal lord’s fiefs and they
were the lord’s serfs.
8. Muslims, Jews and Christians.
3. 1) b; 2) b
9. a) Mudejar Muslims; b) Muladis; c) Mozarabs
4.
10. a) the Catholic Monarchs; b) the Reconquista
When did they arrive?
Visigoth Kingdom
Al-Andalus
In the 5th century
In the 8th century (711)
11. 1) The Knighting Ceremony.
2) He knighted the nobleman.
3) Fidelity and military support to the king.
Unit 6
103
Audioscript
38
1. HISTORIA DE LA MÚSICA, MONJES, REYES Y
JUGLARES. Performed by the monks’ choir at Abadía
de San Martín, Beuron. Deutsche Grammophon,
1997.
2. ALFONSO X EL SABIO, CANTIGAS DE SANTA MARÍA.
STRELA DO MAR. Performed by Capella Reial de
Catalunya Hespèrion XX. Conductor: Jordi Savall.
Astrée, 1993.
Answer key
1.
TYPE OF MUSIC
RELIGIOUS
NON-RELIGIOUS
Cantigas de Santa
María
love, humour or
the adventures of
knights
EXAMPLE
Gregorian Chants
TOPIC
religious themes
AUTHORS
anonymous monks
trobadours
SINGERS
monks
trobadours
PLACE
a church during the
Mass
the castle
LANGUAGE
Latin
Romance language
INSTRUMENTS
a cappella (without
instrumental
accompaniment)
instrumental
accompaniment
PURPOSE
reinforcing prayer
entertaining
2. Open answer.
3. The answers go clockwise: drums and flutes, flutes, flute
and albogue, tejoletas or chopsticks and shawm.
They are not used at present, or only derivations of these
instruments are used.
4. 1) C; 2) A; 3) B; 4) E; 5) D
5. 1) religious
2) non religious
104
Unit 6
Notes
Unit 6
105
7
The Modern Age
The unit begins by looking at the causes of the changes in the
Modern Age and the periods we can divide it into. It contains
images which encapsulate these concepts and help make them
memorable.
The Catholic Monarchs are a model to help pupils assimilate the
new type of monarchy which was becoming established at this
time, and understand its differences with respect to the medieval
monarchs and the feudal system. The development of the Spanish
Monarchy is essential for understanding our world. The unit deals
with the most important themes until the arrival of the House of
Bourbon, and their relationship to social order, art and culture.
This unit also addresses the great discoveries and the encounter
with the great empires of America. This piece of history can lead to
reflection on the values of communication between cultures and
the consequent enrichment which this generates.
The common theme running through this unit is the important
part a thirst for knowledge played in achieving objectives which
had been inconceivable before this period of history.
106
Unit 7
Complementary material
►► Social Science 5 Workbook. Unit 7
Unit Resources
Digital resources
Teacher’s Resources on USB
and at www.smconectados.com
Diagnostic activity.
Caravels
Other materials
Pupil’s Resources on CD and
at www.smsaviadigital.com
Tune up. What do
you know about ...?
Teacher’s materials
Unit 7.
The Modern Age
Let’s play and learn.
The Modern Age
Let’s practise.
Society in the
Modern Age
1. From the Middle Ages
to the Modern Age
Let’s understand.
The Catholic
Monarchs and
America
2. The Catholic Monarchs
Presentation.
Maritime expeditions
Interactive poster. The Modern Age
WB page 64
Reinforcement. Worksheet 1
WB page 65
3. The discovery of the Americas
Who was…? Spanish
conquistadors
Animation. Carlos
V and Felipe II:
territories
Pupil’s materials
Reinforcement. Worksheet 2
Interactive poster. The Age of Discovery
WB page 66
4. The Great Spanish Empire
in the 16th century
WB page 67
5. Economic crisis in
the 17th century
WB page 68
Let’s practise.
Spanish Monarchy
Presentation.
Baroque literature of
the Golden Age
Presentation: Goya
Animation: Carlos III,
Madrid
Presentation. Mind
map
Let’s understand.
The Spanish War of
Succession
Let’s understand.
Architecture in the
Age of Enlightenment
6. Spain’s Monarchy in
the 18th century
WB page 69
Review
Test yourself. Selfevaluation
Web link. Las
Meninas 3D
Let’s understand.
Baroque painters
Let’s understand.
The first voyage
around the world
Review unit 7
Assessment unit 7
Assessment term 3
Skills
Final task
Assessment. Rubric
Extension. Worksheet 1
Final assessment
Test yourself. Check
the way you have
learnt
Unit 7
107
Teaching programme
UNIT AIMS
COMPETENCES
1. Understand what the Modern Age is and the different periods it is divided
into: Renaissance, Baroque and Enlightenment.
2. Understand the main changes that took place during the Modern Age.
3. Learn about the reign of the Catholic Monarchs and its main events.
4. Learn about the Spanish monarchy in the 16th century, its territorial
expansion and the subsequent crisis in the 17th century.
Social and civic competence
(Aims 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6)
5. Understand the social structure and changes taking place during the historical
periods studied.
Linguistic communication
(Aims 8 and 9)
6. Learn about the historical events associated with the arrival of the Bourbon
dynasty and key aspects of the Enlightenment.
7. Work with timelines and historical maps. Use artistic depictions to present
content.
8. Define the main concepts associated with the Modern Age. Use the
appropriate vocabulary.
Competence in learning to learn
(Aims 7 and 10)
Cultural awareness and expression
(Aim 7)
Digital competence
(Aim 11)
9. Prepare written texts on the unit content.
10. Complete group assignments on the unit content.
11. Use new technologies to carry out activities.
contents
108
assesSment criteria
learning standards
learning outcomes
Introduction to scientific knowledge
and its use in the social sciences.
1. Obtain specific, significant
information about previously defined
events and phenomena, using
different sources (direct and
indirect).
1.1. Find, select and organise specific,
significant information. Analyse it,
reach conclusions and
communicate orally or in writing.
(Competence in learning to learn)
• Complete activities using sources of
information such as images and texts.
All of the activities
Using information and
communications technology (ICT) to
search for and select information.
Presenting conclusions.
2. Use ICT to obtain information, learn
and communicate social science
content.
2.1. Use ICT to complete assignments
using terminology appropriate to
the subjects.
(Digital competence)
• Use ICT as a tool for learning and
self-assessment.
Interactive activities on
Saviadigital, Activities: pages
101, 103, 105, 107 and 111
Developing strategies to organise,
memorise and retrieve information
obtained using different methods and
sources.
3. Appreciate the value of group work,
demonstrating a cooperative attitude
and participating responsibly. Accept
differences and show respect and
tolerance for the ideas and
contributions of others in discussions
and debates.
3.1. Participate in group activities,
demonstrating responsible,
constructive behaviour and
solidarity.
(Social and civic competence)
• Participate in group activities.
Demonstrate constructive behaviour
and solidarity.
Activities: page 116
Using strategies to strengthen group
cohesion and cooperative work.
4. Complete individual and group
assignments and presentations that
involve looking for, selecting and
organising historical texts.
4.1. Complete group assignments and
presentations that involve finding,
selecting and organising historical
texts.
(Social and civic competence)
• Work in a group. Orally present
historical content in a clear and
organised way, demonstrating
understanding of the texts.
Activities: page 116
Unit 7
Teaching programme
contents
assesSment criteria
learning standards
learning outcomes
The Modern Age: the Spanish
monarchy.
5. List the main transformations that
took place in Spain during the
Modern Age, distinguishing between
the different spheres: economic,
social, political and cultural.
5.1. List the main social, economic,
political and cultural
transformations that took place
during the Modern Age.
(Social and civic competence)
• Learn about the changes brought
about by the Modern Age. Situate the
different periods on a timeline.
Activities: pages 100 and 101
The Catholic Monarchs: dynastic
union, conquest of Granada, expulsion
of the Jews, discovery of America.
6. Describe the reign of the Catholic
Monarchs, defining it as a period of
transition between the Middle Ages
and the Modern Age.
6.1. Describe the major events of the
reign of the Catholic Monarchs.
Locate them on a timeline.
(Social and civic competence)
• Recognise the expansion of the
territories of the Catholic Monarchs
on the map of Europe and their
policy of marriage connections.
Activities: page 102
The Spanish Empire in the 16th
century during the reigns of Carlos I
and Felipe II, organisation of the
empire, internal and external
problems. The exploration and
colonisation of America. The
Renaissance.
7. Explain the evolution and expansion
of the Spanish monarchy during the
16th century, differentiating
between the reigns of Carlos I and
Felipe II.
7.1. Explain the most important events
of the reigns of Carlos I and Felipe
II and locate them in time. Identify
the territories of the Spanish
monarchy at the time.
(Social and civic competence)
7.2. Describe the social structure of the
peninsular territories during the
16th and 17th centuries.
(Social and civic competence)
(Cultural awareness and
expression)
• Recognise what the Spanish
monarchy is and situate various
related events in time.
Activities: pages 106 and 107
• Learn about the social pyramid for
the Modern Age and locate different
figures on it.
Activities: pages 107 and 113
8. Explain the causes of the decline of
the Empire during the 17th century.
8.1. Describe the events that marked
the decline of the Spanish Empire
with the late Habsburg monarchs.
(Linguistic communication)
• Learn about and explain the causes
of the 17th century crisis. Associate
them with kings Felipe III, Felipe IV
and Carlos II and their advisers.
Activities: pages 108 and 109
9. Make a historical map of the
expedition voyages of the Golden
Age
9.1. Explain the main characteristics of
the Golden Age and Baroque art.
(Cultural awareness and
expression)
• Investigate and work in a group,
making murals on Baroque
architecture, sculpture and painting.
Activities: page 115
The 18th century: Spanish War of
Succession and the Treaty of Utrecht.
10. Describe the causes and
consequences of the Spanish War of
Succession and the Treaty of
Utrecht.
10.1. Recognise the opposing sides in
the Spanish War of Succession
and analyse the consequences of
the Treaty of Utrecht.
(Social and civic competence)
• Analyse the War of the Spanish
Succession, recognise the different
sides and learn about its outcome
and consequences.
Activities: pages 110 and 111
The Enlightenment and the
enlightened despotism of Carlos III.
11. Describe the peak of enlightened
despotism in Spain with Carlos III.
Identify Goya as a painter of this
period.
11.1. Describe the general
characteristics of the reign of
Carlos III, enlightened despotism
and its meaning. Locate Goya
within this reign. Appreciate his
importance.
(Social and civic competence)
(Cultural awareness and
expression)
• Learn and explain what the
enlightened despotism of the reign of
Carlos III involved. Recognise Goya as
its main representative in the sphere
of painting.
Activities: page 111
The decline of the Empire in the 17th
century.
Renaissance and Baroque: the great
figures of the Golden Age.
Unit 7
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Teaching programme
Methodological suggestions
1. Previous knowledge
Based on the curriculum for years 3 and 5 of primary, pupils have already worked on and met some of the concepts and
procedures which are important for tackling this new unit:
• Recognising a century as the unit of measurement for historical time, locating events and identifying them as
successive.
• Knowing how to show historical events on a timeline and use it as a frame of reference.
• Locating the key events in the history of medieval Spain in space and time and connecting them to this new unit.
• Learning about the structure of medieval society.
2. Possible areas of difficulty
Pupils may find the following aspects quite difficult:
• Familiarity with the world map, especially the political map of Europe and the Americas, in order to situate the events
covered in this unit. The greatest difficulty will be that the pupils will not recognise the territories. You will need to help
them see how they are connected to today’s countries.
• Understanding the transition from the Middle Ages to the Modern Age is challenging, as are the Spanish War of
Succession and certain concepts to do with art and cultural movements in this unit.
• Understanding the consequences of the discovery and conquest of America for both Spain and the conquered
civilisations, and avoiding reductionism.
• Lastly, pupils may also have difficulty assimilating the large number of historical figures mentioned in this unit and
making connections between all of the aspects covered in the different sections.
3 Innovation programmes
Cooperative learning
Each unit includes suggested dynamics for working on cooperative learning. These dynamics are developed in the Cooperative Learning Guide,
included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Learning to think
Each unit offers the possibility of using the language and contents learnt through a series of activities related to the topic. Pupils develop
thinking strategies to work through the different content covered in the units. These suggestions are fully developed in the Learning to Think
Guide.
Values
The importance of respecting native cultures. The Modern Age was a period of expansion and colonisation for many European countries, but
the Europeans exploited the native civilisations they found on the lands they conquered and made disappear most of their native cultural
identity. Nowadays, it is still important to preserve indigenous cultures, customs, languages and lifestyles.
5. Suggested distribution of sessions
To complete this unit, we recommend dividing the work into twelve sessions, organised as follows:
INTRODUCTION
content
REVIEW
SKILLS
Final TASK
1 session
6 sessions
2 sessions
2 sessions
1 session
The above session recommendations are intended as a guide. Each teacher should adapt the recommendations based on
their needs and the number of classroom hours allocated.
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Multiple intelligences
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
●
Comprehensive listening
●
Oral presentations
●
Learning new languages
●
Debating ideas
●
Acquiring and using new vocabulary
●
INTRAPERSONAL
eading as a group and individual
R
reading
●
●
●
elf-evaluation and metacognition
S
exercises
Critical and creative thinking activities
ctivities of oral and written expression
A
of ideas and emotions
LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL
●
stablishing classifications,
E
comparisons and series
●
Reading sequences
●
Using numbering in everyday activities
●
Logical reasoning
●
Problem-solving
INTERPERSONAL
Multiple
intelligences
●
●
Creative projects and group research
sing cooperative learning techniques
U
to work as structured groups
NATURALISTIC
VISUAL-SPATIAL
●
Reading and interpreting images
●
Making maps and routes
●
ctive imagination and visualisation
A
activities
●
bserving images from the natural
O
world
●
Simulating natural phenomena
●
Using images to represent nature
BODILY-KINAESTHETIC
●
●
cting out concepts: performing the
A
content that is being studied
anufacturing and inventing models
M
linked to concepts, ideas or processes
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Audioscripts
39
112
TEACHER: OK, Sammy, can you start?
BOY: I wrote about the Baroque period. During the 17th
century, the Baroque period was part of the Golden Age
of literature, art and music. But there was also a great
economic crisis.
TEACHER: Thank you, Sammy, OK, Cristina, you’re next.
GIRL: I wrote about the Renaissance period. It was during
the 16th century that a new way of thinking was started.
It was called humanism. Unlike the Middle Ages,
humanists were more interested in people than in
religion. They studied their history and language.The
Renaissance was the period of humanism, great
explorations and also colonising European Empires with
authoritarian monarchies.
TEACHER: Well done, Cristina, Let’s see ...
PUPILS: Me, me!
TEACHER: Javier, how about you?
BOY 2: I wrote about the 18th century. This was the Age of
Enlightenment because people made great advances in
science and education. Countries became more modern,
but their kings had absolute power.
Unit 7
Answer key
Fun fact! The astrolabe came to Western Europe at the end
of the Middle Ages and it was brought by the Muslims to
Spain.
1.
Century
Period
Characteristics
16th
Renaissance
humanism, exploration
17th
Baroque
literature, art, music,
crisis
18th
Enlightenment
advances in science
and education
2. • The discovery of the Americas in 1492.
• Three centuries.
• Three periods.
Answer key
Fun fact! The motto means that the two monarchs are equal
and they ruled over a unified monarchy. In truth, both
kingdoms remained separate during their lives.
1. Open answer.
2. Expansions and conquests: Navarra, territories in the
north of Africa, America, the Canary Islands, territories in
the Mediterranean.
Political alliances: Territories in Europe.
3. Suggested answer:
The Catholic Monarchs remained the institutions of each
kingdom and developed an administrative system based
on fueros or local laws for each territory. They adopted
an international policy of ‘marriage alliances’ with other
European monarchs.
4. key events: Conquering of Granada, addition of Navarra
and the discovery of the Americas
years of reign: 1469-1516
territories: Castilla, Aragón, Granada, Navarra, Naples
Unit 7
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40
1. Columbus sailed to the Americas only one time.
2. Under the Catholic Monarchs, Castilla and Aragón
were united, but independent.
3. The King of France helped Columbus with his voyage.
4. Castilla ended the Reconquista when it conquered
the Canary Islands.
5. The advanced civilisations already living in the
Americas were not really Indian.
6. In 1512, the Kingdom of Navarra became part of the
Crown of Aragón.
Answer key
Who was? Bartolomé de las Casas protected the Indians
from slavery and he also defended the rights of the
Indians like their lives and properties.
1. 1) False
2) True
3) False
4) False
5) True
6) True
2. Open answer.
3. 1) He thought he could sail to Asia by crossing the
Atlantic Ocean.
2) He wanted to reach the Indies.
4. The Aztec and Mayan civilisations lived in Central
America where they built many pyramid-shaped
temples.
The Inca civilisation lived in the Andes mountain range
where where its most famous ruins, the city of Machu
Picchu, can be admired. Their language was Quechuan
and their descendants continue to speak it.
5. Under Carlos I of Spain and Felipe II.
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Audioscripts
41
1. El Greco was an important artist during his time.
2. He built the San Lorenzo Monastery in el Escorial.
3. He was King of Spain at the same time he was
Emperor of Germany.
4. He was the leader of the Great Spanish Empire.
5. He was the grandson of the Catholic Monarchs.
6. He defended Catholicism against the Protestants and
the Muslim Ottoman Empire.
Answer key
Fun fact! The Great Spanish Empire had territories in all the
longitude of Earth.
1. 1) Felipe II
2) Felipe II
3) both
4) both
5) Carlos I
6) both
2. The Iberian Peninsula, the Americas, the Canary Islands,
the territories in the Mediterranean, the Holy Roman
Empire.
3. Gold and silver commerce with the new continent
allowed the Spanish monarchy to have a powerful army.
4. The Habsburg dynasty. Because of the political alliances
(marriages) the Catholic Monarchs made with the
Habsburgs.
5. Juana I of Castilla married Felipe I (House of Habsburg).
Carlos I of Spain married Isabel of Portugal (House of
Aviz).
Felipe II married Ana of Austria (House of Habsburg).
Felipe III married Margarita of Austria (House of
Habsburg).
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Audioscript
42
1. Validos governed the country and not the king.
2. Many poor people became beggars.
3. The Thirty Years War cost a lot of money.
4. Rich people lived in palaces but most people lived in
corralas.
5. Carlos II was a weak king.
6. Spain lost control of Portugal and Holland.
Answer key
Fun fact! The Habsburg jaw is easily recognisable in the
portraits of Habsburg family members, so we can say
these monarchs are portrayed realistically.
1. 1) cause
2) effect
3) cause
4) effect
5) cause
6) effect
2. War, economic crisis and political struggles.
3. Suggested answer: Initially it was a war for religious
reasons between Protestant and Catholic states. But
deep down it was more about the rivalry between France
Bourbon dynasty and Habsburg for the control of Europe.
It gradually involved most of the great powers of Europe.
4. a) They belonged to the clergy and lived in palaces.
b) They were beggars and lived on the streets.
5. Felipe IV married Isabel of France (House of Bourbon)
and Mariana of Austria (House of Habsburg).
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Audioscript
43
1. These were local laws that governed each territory.
2. This was a time of great scientific advances.
3. This was the process of redefining territories and
giving them all the same laws and taxes.
4. This was a time when art was very ornate.
5. This was a simple artistic style that was influenced by
Ancient Greece and Rome.
Answer key
Fun fact! The owners of these letters of marque became
part of the navy of the country and also fought in the
wars.
1. 1) fueros
2) Age of Enlightenment
3) centralisation
4) Baroque
5) Neoclassicism
2. The Netherlands, the Italian territories, Gibraltar and
Minorca.
3. Open answer.
4. Luis I, Fernando VI, Carlos III, Carlos IV, Fernando VII,
Isabel II, Alfonso XII, Alfonso XIII, Juan Carlos I, Felipe VI.
5. They are both influenced by Ancient Greece and Rome.
6. The Bourbon dynasty has lasted from 1700 until now.
Unit 7
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1
3
2
4
6
5
7
8
9
10
11 12 13
14
15 16
Audioscript
44
MUSEUM GUIDE: Does anyone know what style of
painting this is?
BOY: Baroque?
MUSEUM GUIDE: Yes! Do you know who the painter is?
GIRL: Velázquez?
MUSEUM GUIDE: Very good! It is called Las Hilanderas
and Spanish painter Diego Velázquez painted it in
1657. It shows women in a tapestry workshop and
represents the Greco-Roman myth of Arachne. Do
any of you know what story that is? Well, it is about a
woman named Arachne who challenged the goddess
Athena to a weaving competition. The goddess lost
the competition and, in her anger, turned Arachne
into a spider.
GIRL: So, that’s why spiders weave!
MUSEUM GUIDE: Exactly! Did you know this Baroquestyle painting has been a part of our collection here
in the Prado Museum since 1819? And now, if you’ll
all follow me to our next painting of the tour....
Answer key
1. 1) Authoritarian; 2) The Bourgeoisie; 3) the nobility; 4)
Authoritarian; 5) Aragón; 6) the Reconquista;
7) Christopher Columbus; 8) Felipe II; 9) America; 10)
validos; 11) crisis; 12) Europe; 13) Habsburg; 14) Felipe V;
15) absolute; 16) enlightened
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Unit 7
2. a) Catholic Monarchs; b) Great Spanish; c) cultural;
d) Enlightenment
3.
16th century
17th century
18th century
El Greco
Felipe II
Meninas
Felipe IV
Carlos III
Enlightenment
Puerta de Alcalá
4. Discovery of America, the Great Spanish Empire, the
Thirty Years’ War, the Golden Age, the War of
Succession, Carlos III.
5. a) Las Hilanderas.
b) Diego de Velázquez in 1657.
c) It is about a woman named Arachne who challenged
the goddess Athena to a weaving competition. Athena
lost the competition and, in her anger, turned Arachne
into a spider.
d) In the Prado Museum since 1819.
6. 1) c; 2) a; 3) Fernando II of Aragón
7. a) They were copied by hand.
b) The clergy.
c) The printing press was invented by Johannes
Gutenberg in 1449.
8. Privileges: bourgeoisie, clergy, authoritarian monarch.
No privileges: peasants, artisans.
9. Peru: Quechua
Guatemala: Quichean
Mexico: Nahuatl
Answer key
1. 1) A
2) A
3) C
2. 1) portrait
2) Baroque
3) mirrors
4) background
5) queen
3. Open answer.
4. Open answer.
Unit 7
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Answer key
Answer key
1. c)
Put yourself in her place
2. b)
1. a) peasants
b) artisan
c) bourgeoisie
3. c)
4. a)
5. a)
6. c)
7. c)
8. a)
9. b)
10. b)
2. a) Isabel de Trastámara, known as Isabel La Católica.
b) Open answer. Pupils should preferably list the dynastic
union with Aragón, the conquest of Granada and the
discovery of America.
c) She belonged to the nobility and lived in different
palaces belonging to the Crown of Castilla.
d) The women of the nobility did receive some education;
in fact they were often better educated than their
husbands, who were primarily concerned with their
war-related duties.
A great event
1. a) The first picture shows Gutenberg’s printing press and
the second shows the discovery of America.
b) Picture a belongs to the final years of the Middle Ages
and picture b to the beginning of the Modern Age.
c) Johannes Gutemberg and Christopher Columbus.
d) The printing press permitted the the spread of
knowledge to a wider social spectrum, while the
discovery of America brought about knowledge of a
new world and its conquest by the Crown of Castilla.
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Answer key
Answer key
Dangerous football
Modern singers
Between the 13th and 15th centuries.
Because during the time when the universities were
founded in America, these territories belonged to Spain.
The burden of being a knight
Cantar de Mío Cid.
The Road to El Dorado
Bath time …once a year!
The Americas. Mexico was conquered by Hernán Cortés.
Muslim culture.
A flag contest
Necessary recycling
The symbols of Spain are the flag, the coat of arms, and the
national anthem. The flag has two red stripes separated by
one yellow stripe in the middle, the yellow stripe being twice
the width of each red stripe. In the centre of the flag the
constitutional coat of arms appears.
There is no question here. Pupils should read and comment
on the text.
The king of ice cream
In the 17th century, monarchies were of the absolute or
authoritarian type: they had great political and territorial
power thanks to the expansion of their armies and civil
servants.
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6
The Middle Ages
This unit begins by introducing the concept of the Middle Ages and
explaining its chronology as the main feature that defines this period.
The following section discloses how the Iberian Peninsula was
organised in the early centuries of the period, the formation of the
Visigothic kingdom of Toledo, the the arrival of the Muslims later
and the creation of an Islamic territory called al-Andalus.
Subsequently, the Christian Kingdoms emerged in northern
peninsular areas not occupied by Muslims. They are presented and
their main characteristics are explained. The process by which
these kingdoms moved towards the south was known as the
Reconquista.
The unit revolves around the concept of equal or unequal societies
in order to tie everything together, and this concept is also linked
to the final task learning by discovering topic: medieval society and
the value expressed in the unit. The purpose is to make pupils
understand about what people's life was like by connecting this
period of time to their life nowadays.
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Unit 6
Complementary material
►► Social Science 5 Workbook. Unit 6
Workbook
Workbook
151
Unit Resources
Digital resources
Teacher's Resources on USB
and at www.smconectados.com
Diagnosis activity.
The Middle Ages
Other materials
Pupil's Resources on CD and
at www.smsaviadigital.com
Tune up. What do
you know about ...?
Presentation. The
Middle Ages timeline
Teacher's materials
Pupil's materials
Unit 6.
The Middle Ages
1. The Middle Ages
Map. The Iberian Peninsula in the Middle Ages
Cut-outs. The Middle Ages
WB page 42
Who was…? Visigoth
kings
Activity. Medieval
Muslim and Christian
cities
Web link. Islamic
History of Europe
2. Visigoths in the Iberian Peninsula
3. al-Andalus
Who was…? The first
caliph of Córdoba
Presentation. The
Reconquista
WB page 43
Reinforcement. Worksheet 3
WB page 44
4. The Reconquista in the Iberian
Peninsula
WB page 45
5. The Christian Kingdoms in the
Iberian Peninsula
Reinforcement. Worksheet 1, 2
Map. The Way of Saint James
Let’s understand.
Medieval art styles
Let’s play and learn.
Time travel
WB page 46
6. Feudalism in the Iberian Peninsula
Let’s practise. Fiefs
and boroughs
WB page 47
7. Art and culture in the Middle Ages
Presentation.
Medieval society
Assessment. Rubric
Poster. The medieval city
Let’s practise.
Romanesque and
gothic styles
Extension. Worksheet 1
WB pages 48-49
Review
Review Unit 6.
Assessment Unit 6
Test yourself. Self
evaluation
Skills
Presentation.
Medieval society
Assessment. Rubric
Final task
Test yourself. Check
the way you have
learnt
*Flashcards and word cards available in the Classroom Box to support the target language.
Unit 6
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Teaching programme
OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIT
SKILLS
1. Learn the essential characteristics of the Middle Ages in Europe and on the
Iberian Peninsula.
Social and civic competence
(Aims 1, 2, 5, 8)
2. Identify the social, political, economic and cultural features of each of the
civilisations of the period.
Linguistic communication
(Aims 1, 2, 7, 8)
3. Put the different periods and main events of the Middle Ages in chronological
order.
Mathematical competence and basic competence in science and technology
(Aim 3)
4. Recognise the main examples of artistic expression found during the period
and describe their most characteristic features.
Cultural awareness and cultural expressions
(Aim 4)
5. Appreciate the importance of the social model established on the peninsula
during the Middle Ages as an example of coexistence among different
cultures.
6. Complete individual and group assignments on specific aspects of the unit.
Competence in learning to learn
(Aim 6)
Digital competence
(Aim 9)
7. Define concepts related to the unit.
8. Prepare written texts on the unit content.
9. Use new technologies to carry out activities.
contents
Introduction to scientific knowledge
and its use in the social sciences.
assesSment criteria
learning standards
1. Obtain specific, significant
information about previously defined
events and phenomena, using
different sources (direct and
indirect).
1.1. Find, select and organise specific,
significant information. Analyse it,
reach conclusions, reflect on the
process and communicate orally
and/or in writing.
(Linguistic communication)
learning outcomes
• Complete activities using maps and
images as sources of information.
ActIvities: pp. 79, 91, 98, 100.
• Research a previously defined event
using different sources.
Activities: pp. 79, 98.
Developing strategies to organise,
memorise and retrieve information
obtained using different methods and
sources.
2. Develop responsibility, the ability to
work hard and perseverance with
regard to schoolwork.
Using information and
communications technology to search
for and select information. Presenting
conclusions.
3. With guidance, use information and
communications technology to obtain
information and learn to express
content.
2.1. Complete the assigned tasks and
submit clear, neat and organised
work.
(Competence in learning to learn)
3.1. Use information and
communications technology to
complete assignments using
terminology appropriate to the
subjects.
(Digital competence)
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Unit 6
• Complete tasks in a clear, neat and
organised manner.
Activities: pp. 79, 98.
• Use ICT as a tool for learning and
self-assessment.
Activities on Saviadigital,
Activities: pp. 83, 84, 85, 87, 89,
91, 93.
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Teaching programme
contents
The main periods and events of the
Middle Ages.
The Germanic invasions and the
Visigoth Kingdom.
assesSment criteria
learning standards
learning outcomes
4. Identify the key events in the history
of Spain. Locate them in space and
time.
4.1. Locate the key events in the
history of medieval Spain in space
and time.
• Learn about the main periods of the
Middle Ages.
(Social and civic competence)
5. Describe the most important
historical periods of medieval Europe
and the Iberian Peninsula.
5.1. Situate the most important
historical periods of the medieval
Iberian Peninsula on a timeline:
Visigoth Kingdom, al-Andalus and
the Christian Kingdoms.
Activities: pp. 80, 81.
• Learn about the Visigoth Kingdom in
the Iberian Peninsula.
Activities: pp. 82, 83.
(Mathematical competence)
5.2. Show the main historical events
relating to al-Andalus on a
timeline.
Al-Andalus: political development,
economy, social organisation,
traditions, religion, culture, sciences
and art. Cultural legacy
Activities: pp. 83, 84.
(Mathematical competence)
5.3. Locate the main historical events
relating to the Christian kingdoms
on a timeline.
(Social and civic competence)
The Christian Kingdoms: origins and
formation, the Reconquista and
resettlement, social organisation, the
Way of Saint James, art and culture.
• Interpret the timeline for al-Andalus.
6. Explain the influence of Arab
civilisation in Spain. Describe its
artistic, cultural and economic
legacy.
6.1. Describe the artistic, cultural and
economic legacy of al-Andalus.
7. Explain the process of the
Reconquista, associating it with the
social and political structure of the
Christian kingdoms.
7.1. Explain the process of the
Reconquista and resettlement of
the Christian kingdoms.
(Social and civic competence)
(Linguistic communication,
cultural awareness and cultural
expressions)
7.2. Describe the importance of the
Way of St. James.
(Cultural awareness and cultural
expressions)
7.3. Explain how society was organised
in the Middle Ages and its
relationship with land ownership
as a symbol of power.
• Understand the territorial evolution
of the Christian kingdoms.
Activities: pp. 88, 89.
• Identify different characteristics of
the culture of al-Andalus.
Activities: pp. 83, 84.
• Understand the territorial and
cultural evolution of the Christian
kingdoms through the Reconquista.
Activities: pp. 87, 88.
• Understand the cultural and artistic
significance of the Way of St. James.
Activities: p. 93.
• Observe the differences in the feudal
pyramid.
Activities: p. 98.
(Social and civic competence)
• Coexistence of three cultures:
Muslim, Jewish and Christian.
8. Describe the unique features of the
three cultures: Muslim, Jewish and
Christian.
8.1. Explain the importance of the
coexistence of the three cultures as
an element which enriched Spanish
culture.
• Appreciate the importance of tolerant
coexistence among various cultures.
Activities: pp. 87, 88.
(Social and civic competence)
8.2. Identify the different
characteristics of the Early Middle
Ages and the Late Middle Ages.
(Social and civic competence ,
cultural awareness and cultural
expressions)
• All of the learning standards help pupils acquire Basic competences.
• Understand what life was like in
a medieval fief and a medieval
borough.
Activities: pp. 90, 91.
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Teaching programme
Methodological suggestions
1. Previous knowledge
Based on the curriculum, most of the concepts covered in this unit will be new to the pupils. However, there are some
concepts which they may already be familiar with, either from their earlier education or by learning about them from
books, films, television series, etc.
• The concept of the Middle Ages.
• The periodisation of the Middle Ages and the milestones that mark its beginning and end.
• The different cultures that coincided on the peninsula, especially the Christian and Muslim.
• The main features of different ways of life in the Middle Ages: knights and castles, peasants, monks, etc.
• Recognising cathedrals as typical structures found during the medieval period.
2. Possible areas of difficulty
Despite having some previous knowledge, pupils may encounter some of the following difficulties when studying this
unit, especially in relation to:
• The fact that different cultures coincided on the peninsula during the Middle Ages makes it necessary to dispense with
traditional chronological sequencing. The jumps in time required to present the content may lead to a certain degree of
confusion in the pupils.
• Additionally, the use of maps on which information about different periods is superimposed, especially the map of the
Reconquista, must be explained carefully. You should anticipate that the pupils will have difficulty understanding their
meaning.
• In the History workshop, pupils are asked to establish a relationship between historical cartography and the territorial
evolution of the main kingdoms. It is important to explain that the origins of many of today’s autonomous communities
lie in the medieval kingdoms, and also to establish the differences between the medieval period and the present day in
terms of political, industrial, economic and social aspects.
• Pupils will need to use specific vocabulary, especially when studying al-Andalus. This includes the terms Muladi,
Mudejar, Mozarab, etc., which may cause confusion.
3 Innovation programmes
Cooperative Learning
Each unit includes suggested dynamics for working on cooperative learning. These dynamics are developed in the Cooperative Learning Guide,
included with the Teacher’s Resources.
Learning to think
Each unit offers the possibility of using the language and contents learnt throughout a series of activities related to the topic. Pupils develop
thinking strategies to work through the different content covered in the units. These suggestions are fully developed in the Learning to Think
Guide.
Values
The coexistence and tolerance among the Christian, Muslim and Jewish religions found on the peninsula during the Middle Ages is an example
of respect for a variety of different groups of people. This subject allows us to cover education for coexistence as a key educational value in
the curriculum, as it emphasises the importance of tolerant coexistence among all groups of people, based on democratic values and human
rights shared by all.
4. Suggested distribution of sessions
To complete this unit, we recommend dividing the work into eleven sessions, organised as follows:
Introduce the unit
content
Organise your ideas
Review the Unit
Final Sections
1 session
6 sessions
1 session
1 session
2 sessions
The above session recommendations are intended as a guide. Each teacher should adapt the recommendations based on
their needs and the number of classroom hours allocated.
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Unit 6
Workbook
Workbook
155
Specific treatment of multiple intelligences
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
●
Comprehensive listening
●
Oral presentations
●
Learning new languages
●
Debating ideas
●
Acquiring and using new vocabulary
●
Role-playing games
INTRAPERSONAL
●
●
●
●
LOGICAL-MATHEMATICAL
●
elf-evaluation and metacognition
S
exercises
Critical and creative thinking activities
I ndividual tasks where they can work
alone to express ideas and personal
opinions about content
ransference: learning how to apply the
T
subjects learnt in class
stablishing classifications,
E
comparisons and series
●
Reading sequences
●
Using numbering in everyday activities
●
Logical reasoning
●
Problem-solving
INTERPERSONAL
Multiple
intelligences
●
Conflict-solving dynamics
●
Practising empathy
●
Identifying other people’s feelings
VISUAL-SPATIAL
●
Reading and interpreting images
●
Making maps and routes
●
●
NATURALISTIC
●
ctive imagination and visualisation
A
activities
nderstanding the relation between
U
historical events and the environment
Analysing artworks
BODILY-KINAESTHETIC
●
●
cting out concepts: performing the
A
content that is being studied
Role-playing game
MUSICAL
●
uditory discrimination of musical
A
instruments and sounds in the
environment.
Unit 6
155
Workbook
156
Workbook
Answer key
1. Pupils draw a time line of the Middle Ages with the start
and end dates (476-1492) and the periods, comprise of:
High Middle Ages and Middle Ages. The Midle Ages
ended six centuries ago.
2. Pupils place the events that occurred in the Iberian
Peninsula on the Middle Ages timeline.
3. Early Middle Ages → feudalism →agriculture
Late Middle Ages →city →commerce
156
Unit 6
Workbook
Workbook
157
Audioscript
27
1. What type of civilisation were the Visigoths?
2. What was the Roman agreement with the Visigoths?
3. What mountain range did the Germanic tribes cross
to enter the Iberian Peninsula?
4. Who forced the Visigoths back to Hispania?
5. When did the Visigoth’s create their Kingdom on the
Iberian Peninsula?
Answer key
1. Pupils draw a time line of the Middle Ages with the start
and end dates (476-1492) and the periods comprise:
High Middle Ages and Middle Ages. Ended 6th centuries
ago.
2. Placed the events that occurred in the Iberian Peninsula
in the timeline the four maps.
3. Early Middle Ages → feudalism →agriculture
4. Late Middle Ages → city →commerce
Unit 6
157
Workbook
158
Workbook
Audioscript
28
1. The Muslims were on the Iberian Peninsula for only
two centuries.
2. In 756, al-Andalus became the politically
independent emirate of Toledo.
3. In 722, the Christians stopped the Muslims from
advancing farther north in the Battle of Covadonga.
4. In the 11th century, al-Andalus was divided into small
kingdoms called taifas.
5. By the 13th century, the Muslim empire began to fall.
Answer key
1. 1.F. 2.F. 3.T 4.T 5.T
2. Open answer.
3. Open answer.
4. • Andalucía. It evolved from the Arabic name that means
'land of vandals'. • Islam: the religion of the Muslims. •
Muslim: a follower of Islam. Arabic: the language of the
Arabs. Arab: a member of a group of people originally
from the Arabian Peninsula who now live mostly in the
Middle East and northern Africa. Moor: a member of a
group of North African Arabian people who ruled parts of
Spain from the 8th century until 1492.
5. • The mosque was used for praying. The alcázar was
used as a fortified castle. • Open answer
158
Unit 6
Workbook
Audioscript - Unit 1
1
Page 4, activity 1.
TEACHER: We are very lucky today, class, because through a special educational program we and
many other schools will all be connecting directly
with the Space Station up in outer space by the
Internet.
STUDENT: With an astronaut?
TEACHER: Yes!
ASTRONAUT: Hello from outer space!
How’s the weather down there? I’m four hundred
km above Earth right now!
That’s nothing compared to the enormous
distances in the universe. For them, we use light
years. A light year measures distance in the
universe.
And in that huge universe, we live in just one of
the millions of galaxies that exist there. Our
galaxy is called the Milky Way.
And in our huge galaxy, there are billions of stars
like our Sun. And did you know that of all those
stars, our Sun is just medium in size? The Earth is
one hundred times smaller than the Sun. So, can
you imagine how large the other Suns are?!
As a star, the Sun is constantly changing. The
celestial bodies orbit around the Sun in the solar
system but we don’t always notice these changes
in our Star.
TEACHER: Thank you very much! It’s been a
pleasure hearing you speak from so far away.
ASTRONAUT:Thank you! Good bye!
STUDENT: Bye-bye, bye-bye.
2
Page 5, activity 4.
TEACHER: Draw a very big circle.
Across the centre of the planet, draw four big
stripes.
Colour these stripes brown, blue, brown, blue.
On the bottom brown stripe, draw a big brown
and orange eye.
Which planet is it?
3
Page 6, activity 8.
STUDENT: In winter, the northern hemisphere is
tilted away from the Sun. This makes the Sun’s
rays hit the Iberian Peninsula at an angle. Because
they are not strong sun rays, it is colder and it
gets dark earlier.
4
Page 7, activity 10.
SCIENTIST: Life is possible because of a layer of
gases that surrounds the Earth. This is called the
atmosphere and we can divide it into several
layers.
For example, the troposphere is the closest to the
Earth’s surface whereas the exosphere is the
furthest.
Another layer is the thermosphere where the
aurora borealis form. The stratosphere contains
the ozone layer that protects Earth from the Sun’s
radiation. And lastly, the mesosphere is where we
can see falling stars when they reach it.
When we talk about outer space, we refer to the
void beyond the atmosphere. Radiation and
objects pass through it freely. That is why, for
example, astronauts used a spacesuit to protect
themselves when they reached the Moon.
5
Page 8, activity 12.
PICTURE A: It creates clouds when it condenses in
the sky. When you exhale and it is cold outside, its
condensation lets you see your breath. What kind
of water is it?
PICTURE B: It can be in rivers, lakes and
groundwater. It is fresh water. What kind of water
is it?
PICTURE C: It is salt water. It is in oceans and seas.
What kind of water is it?
PICTURE D: Along with the ice in glaciers, this water
appears in the coldest areas of the planet. It is
water in a solid state. What kind of water is it?
6
Page 9, activity 13.
TEACHER: The Prime Meridian is at 0º longitude.
Trace it with a green pencil.
The equator is at 0º latitude. Trace it with a red
pencil.
And now, let’s find two cities on the map.
The city of Rio de Janeiro is in the southern
hemisphere. This city is at around latitude 20º S
and longitude 40º W. Write the letter A next to it.
The city of Oslo, Norway, is in the northern
hemisphere. It is at around latitude 60º N and
longitude 10º E. Write the letter B next to it.
Workbook
159
Audioscript
29
1. What was the name of the Muslim kingdom?
2. In what region of the Iberian Peninsula was alAndalus?
3. From which direction did the Christian kingdoms
advance?
4. In what year did the Christian Reconquista end?
5. Where was the last Nasrid kingdom that was
conquered?
Answer key
1. 1. Al-Andalus. 2. All the peninsula except the mountains
in the north. 3. Towards the south. 4. 1492. 5. Granada.
2. 722 and 1492 are the start and end dates of the
Reconquista. They correspond to the Battle of
Covadonga and the Reconquista of the last Muslim
territory by the Catholic Monarchs.
3. The Battle of Guadalete occurred in 711. The Visigoth
army was defeated by the Muslims. This Muslim victory
allowed Muslim armies to continue their expansion and
conquest of the peninsula and led the Visigoth nobles to
scape to the mountains in the north. From there, they
founded the first Christian Kingdoms.
Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa occurred in 1212. It was a
very important victory for the Christian armies over the
Muslims. It meant the beginning of the end of the
Muslim dominance over the peninsula.
The Battle of Covadonga took place in 722. It was the
first significant victory of the Christians over the Muslims
and marked the beginning of the Reconquista.
4. Open answer.
5. Mudejar Muslims: Muslims who stayed in Christian
territories but kept their religion.Mozarabs: They were
Christians who kept their religion and lived in Muslim
territory.Muladis: These were Christians who converted
to Islam and lived in Muslim territory.
6. Open answer.
Unit 6
159
Workbook
Audioscript - Unit 2
7
8
Page 15, activity 5.
In Spain it is extremely varied.
The northern coastal regions are cool and humid; the
central plateau is cold in the winter and hot in the
summer.
Andalucía, on the other hand, has mild temperatures
until the summer, when you can have temperatures
of above 40 °C in the shade!
Rainfall is heavy in the northern regions, but the
southern regions only have half the amount.
9
Page 17, activity 12.
It is very dry here and hot. When it rains, which is
very not very often, it is usually in the winter months
and early spring, that is December, January,
February, March and April.
10
160
Page 14, activity 1.
1. Oh, it’s so hot and sunny today! I wanted to visit a
lot of monuments but I think it is so hot that I’m
going to wait until the sun gets lower.
2. I don’t think it’s going to rain. Yes, it’s true, it’s
very cloudy but the weather report says it won’t.
Yes, I think I’m going to take the bike because it’s
warm outside.
3. It’s raining today. Good thing I have to work all
day! Besides that it’s so cold...
4. Yes, I’m on the train now. Wow, despite the nice
temperatures, you can barely see Big Ben
because of the fog!
Page 18, activity 13.
TEACHER: Spain’s oceanic climate extends across
the north and northwest of the peninsula,
between the Pyrenees and Galicia, its abundant
precipitation and mild temperatures make the
landscape very green. What colour should we
colour this area?
BOY: Let’s colour it brown!
TEACHER: Most of Spain has a Mediterranean
inland climate. It extends across the entire central
plateau and inland part of the peninsula. It rains
mostly in the spring and autumn. It has long, cold
winters, but its short summers are hot. Its forests
change colours during the autumn. What colour
do you think this area should be?
GIRL: Orange!
TEACHER: The coastal Mediterranean climate is
found in the southern and eastern coasts of the
peninsula. These areas are dry and have mild
temperatures, except in summer, when they are
very high. This area is famous for its sandy
beaches. What is the best colour for this area?
GIRL: Blue! Like the sea.
Workbook
TEACHER: The only territory in Spain with a subtropical
climate is the Canary Islands. This is because it is very
near the Earth’s tropical climate zone. It has nice
temperatures all year round, but little rain. What
colour should this area be on our map?
BOY: Let’s colour it green!
TEACHER: Only the highest peaks in Spain have a
mountain climate. They have cool summers and
very long, cold winters. Most of their precipitation
is snow. What colour should we colour these
areas?
GIRL: Pink!
11
Page 19, activity 16.
GIRL 1: Hi! I’m Alice. I’m kayaking with my family
along the river Narcea. It is a tributary of the River
Nalón. They belong to the Cantabrian watershed.
The water flow is very fast here, which makes it a
great place to kayak.
BOY: Hi there! My name is Tom. I’m at the
hydroelectric plant here between the River Duero
and its tributary the River Esla. This tributary has
the largest water flow because it starts up in the
Cordillera Cantábrica, which makes it perfect for
making electricity before it flows into the Atlantic
Ocean.
GIRL 2: Hello! I’m Rebecca. I’m at my friend’s farm
near the river Jalón. It’s a tributary of the River
Ebro. They both belong to the Ebro depression.
12
Page 20, activity 17.
1. Most of Spain’s territories are here.
2. This is a mountain chain that separates the
Meseta Central from the Ebro Depression.
3. This southern mountain chain is beyond the
Meseta Central.
4. This is the only body of water that surrounds the
Peninsula that is not a sea.
5. These are fertile lands for farming that surround
the rivers Ebro and Guadalquivir.
6. This is the only country that shares the Iberian
Peninsula with Spain.
13
Page 21, activity 21.
This is actually a natural process that occurs in the
Earth’s atmosphere. There is a balance between
harmful and beneficial gases in the atmosphere. It is
enough to keep the Sun’s heat in while blocking out
the Sun’s harmful rays. This is what makes life
possible on Earth. This process is called the
greenhouse effect.
The problem is when human activities create too
many harmful gases like carbon dioxide or methane
that stay in the atmosphere. These gases trap heat
and make temperatures rise. This is what we call
global warming.
Audioscript
30
160
1. They originally belonged to the Spanish March of the
Frankish Empire.
2.They joined in 1230 to become the Crown of Castilla.
3. It was the first Christian Kingdom and Pelayo was its
king.
4. It separated from the Kingdom of León in the middle
of the 12th century to become an independent
Kingdom.
5. King Sancho III el Mayor was its greatest king.
Unit 6
Answer key
1. 1. Aragón and the Catalonian counties.
2. Kingdoms of León and Kingdom of Castilla. 3.
Kingdom of Asturias. 4. Kingdom of Castilla. 5. Kingdom
of Pamplona-Navarra.
2. Four: Kingdom of Portugal, Kingdom of Navarra and
Crown of Castilla and Aragón.
Workbook
Audioscript - Unit 3
14
Page 26, activity 2.
1. In Spain, most of them come from Romania and
Morocco.
2. This is higher nowadays thanks to healthier
lifestyles and modern medicine.
3. This is a demographic process measuring a
population’s number of deaths for every 1000
people.
4. This is positive when there are more births and
immigrants than deaths and emigrants.
5. It is Spain’s population nowadays because people
live longer and have less children.
15
Page 27, activity 4.
TEACHER: OK, class, we have been learning about
Spain and its population. We have a special guest
today. Mr. Johnson is a sociologist who is going to
answer any questions you have about Spain and
its population. Claudia, have you got your
questions ready?
GIRL: Yes, I was wondering, where does most of
Spain’s population live?
MAN: In the city. This is because there is more work
in the city. So people that are younger and able to
work live in the city near their jobs.
GIRL: And what about older people?
MAN: Well, there are many older people who live in
rural areas.
GIRL: And why is Spain’s population ageing?
MAN: That’s a good question! The reason is that the
number of births throughout the country has
gone down a lot and yet people are living longer.
TEACHER: Thank you, Mr. Johnson, we appreciate
you coming to speak to our class.
MAN: My pleasure.
16
Page 29, activity 7.
MAN: Hi, I work for the statistics department, could
I ask you some questions about you and your
family, please?
WOMAN: Yes, of course.
MAN: How many are there in your family?
WOMAN: Three. Me, my son and my father.
MAN: How old is your son?
WOMAN: My son Gary is 11. He’s in 5th year in
Primary.
MAN: And your father?
WOMAN: My father’s name is Tom. He’s 75 and he is
retired.
MAN: And what is your name and age?
WOMAN: My name is Linda. I am 43.
MAN: And what is your job, Linda?
WOMAN: I’m a lawyer.
Workbook
161
Audioscript
31
1. What social, economic and political system was used
in the Early Middle Ages?
2. What was the name of the land a nobleman received
from the king?
3. What were the new cities of the Late Middle Ages
called?
4. What was the new social group that lived in
boroughs?
5. Where did Jews and Muslims live in these medieval
cities?
Answer key
1. 1. Feudalism 2. Fief. 3. Boroughs.
4.Bourgeoisie. 5. In Jewish and Muslim quarters.
2. 1. Sefs. 2. Feudal lords. 3. Artisans and merchants
(bourgeoisie). 4. Knights and vassals.
3. Open answer.
Unit 6
161
Workbook
Audioscript - Unit 4
17
18
19
20
162
Page 34, activity 2.
1. Entrepreneurs come up with the ideas needed to
start businesses.
2. Water is a resource that many businesses use.
3. Machines are resources necessary for production.
4. Workers carry out the tasks needed for
production.
5. Internet sites are important technological
resources for businesses.
6. Plants are an important natural resource many
companies need to make their product.
Page 35, activity 4.
WOMAN: I like my job because I help people that are
ill. I work at the hospital.
MAN 1: I’ve been working in the coal mines for many
years now. It’s a family tradition. My father and
grandfather also worked in the mines.
MAN 2: I love my job. I have my own workshop and I
like making things with my own two hands. I
make ceramic pots and plates and paint them
beautiful colours.
Page 36, activity 6.
1. These are people like farmers and miners that
supply businesses with raw materials.
2. These are people that take raw materials to
factories or manufactured products to the shops.
3. These are the places where raw materials are
turned into manufactured products.
4. These are the people that buy products at
restaurants or shops.
5. This is something that consumers buy. It can be
man-made or natural.
6. These are natural products that factories use to
turn into a manufactured product.
Page 37, activity 9.
1. They sometimes obtain raw materials from the
sea.
2. They obtain raw materials and food from animals.
3. They work on farms.
4. They obtain raw materials and food from plants.
5. They obtain materials from underground.
6. They obtain raw materials and food from animals.
Workbook
21
22
Page 38, activity 11.
Nowadays, most businesses participate in
international trade. For example, mobile phones are
made in different countries and so, the shops that
sell them, deal in international trade. Hypermarkets
buy their products from different countries and sell
them. This is why they are also a part of international
trade.
Local shops, on the other hand, like your local bakery
or the neighbourhood bar you and your family go to
for tapas belong to national trade because they
usually use just local food products.
Depending on the type of restaurant and the
products it uses for its food, it can belong to national
trade or international trade. A local restaurant
participates in national trade, but a large hamburger
chain is a part of a large international enterprise.
Page 39, activity 13.
In the past, most people in Spain were farmers and
lived in villages.
New machines, such as tractors, made farming
easier.
With less work in the fields, farmers went to the city
to work in factories.
Nowadays, most people in Spain live in cities and
work in the tertiary sector.
Answer key
Answer key (Page 163)
1. Romace languages are the languages that evolved from
Vulgar Latin, which was the daily speech of the vulgar or
common people. • Romance languages that exist today
are all Iberian languages (except Basque), and as well as
Portuguese, French, Italian and Romanian. • Open
answer.
Mind map: 1. 5th. 2. 15th 3. The Early Middle Ages and the
Late Middle Ages. 4. feudalism. 5. Germanic. 6. Toledo. 7.
8th. 8. 15th. 9. Islam. 10. Muslim. 11. Arabic. 12. Commerce.
13. numbers. 14. Visigoth. 15. north. 16. Reconquista.
17 Romance. 18. Gothic.
2. Cantar de mio Cid was written in the Romance language,
which later gave rise to the current Castilian. It was
composed around 1200.
3. Romanesque → the Early Middle Ages.
Gothic → the Late Middle Ages.
1. Model answer: a) The Early Middle Ages: Feudalism was
the social, economic and political system. It depended on
the possession of lands. Agriculture was the main
activity. A few feudal lords owned the land (the fief) and
the most of the people worked on these land. People
abandoned the cities and went to live in the countryside
to work on the fiefs. They were the feudal lord’s serfs.
The Late Middle Ages: Commerce increased again and
larger cities grew. The bourgeoisie emerged in these
cities. It was form of artisans and merchants. They were
free and did not serve the feudal lords. b) The Visigoths
entered the peninsula in the 5th century. The Kingdom of
Toledo lasted from 507 to 711. c) Al-Andalus: mosque and
alcázar. Christian kingdoms: castle and cathedral.
2.
162
Unit 6
The Visigoths
al-Aldalus
Christian kingdoms
Germanic
Leovigildo
small stone church
Mosque
Mozarab
souk
caliphate of
Córdoba
Mudejar
Catalonian Counties
cathedral
feudalism
Workbook
Audioscript - Unit 5
23
24
Page 44, activity 2.
1.
SHOPKEEPER: Hello, Michael, how can I help you?
BOY: I’d like to buy that new video game.
SHOPKEEPER: Are you sure? It’s very expensive!
BOY: Yes, I got money for my birthday!
SHOPKEEPER: Good for you! That’ll be 50 euros.
BOY: Here you go—here’s 20, 40, 45, 46, 47, 48,
49... 50 euros!
SHOPKEEPER: Thank you, Michael—and happy
birthday!
2.
GIRL 1: What about this dress?
GIRL 2: Ooh, THAT’S pretty! How much is it?
GIRL 1: 110 euros!
GIRL 2: What!? Oh that’s TOO expensive!
GIRL 1: Well, what about this one? It’s only 40 euros.
GIRL 2: Yeah, I like the price, but it isn’t as nice a
dress as that other one, is it?
GIRL 1: Yeah, I guess we’ll need to keep looking ...
3.
DAUGHTER: What are you doing, Dad?
FATHER: Oh, just checking our bank account and
seeing how much money we have after paying our
bills.
DAUGHTER: What will we do with the savings?
FATHER: Well, keep saving. You never know when
something unexpected can come up. Besides, we
want to save money so we can go on a family
holiday this summer, don’t we?
Page 45, activity 4.
1. These are expenses we have every month for our
food, clothing and house.
2. This refers to how popular a product is and how
many consumers want it.
3. This is when consumers in a growing economy
have more money to spend.
4. This is money a retired person gets every month.
5. This is the price when both supply and demand
are the same.
6. This is the place where producers and consumers
trade their products.
25
26
Page 46, activity 5.
1. I like my job because I can set my own hours. I’m a
plumber, so I work for myself, but I also have two
employees who help me.
2. My family owns a small bakery. We bake the best
cakes in town!
3. I am part-owner of the small strawberry farm that
I work at. There are about 50 of us working in the
fields and another 50 that work in packaging and
shipping.
4. Although my office is in Madrid, I actually work for
a Belgian company. At work, I speak Spanish,
French and English.
5. I am a writer. I have a blog. I get money from
advertisements and for articles that I write. I enjoy
working from home and not having a boss.
6. I work in a large factory. There are over 1000
employees. We build refrigerators.
Page 47, activity 8.
NARRATOR: It is Saturday. Lisa doesn’t work today.
She is about to have breakfast, when...
LISA: Oh, no! Not the microwave! Now I need to buy
a new one!
NARRATOR: Lisa leaves her flat and she stops first
to have breakfast.
LISA: Could I have a toast and coffee, please?
BARISTA: That’s 2 euros.
LISA: Here you go, thanks.
NARRATOR: After breakfast, Lisa buys a ticket and
takes the bus downtown.
LISA: One, please.
BUS DRIVER: one pount fifty, exact change, please.
NARRATOR: Then Lisa goes to a local shop.
SHOPKEEPER: Can I help you?
LISA: Yes, I need a microwave.
SHOPKEEPER: Oh! Well, we have many models.
NARRATOR: Lisa looks at many different models
and decides on the best microwave for her needs.
SHOPKEEPER: 150 euros. Will that be cash or credit
card?
LISA: Credit card, please.
NARRATOR: Finally, Lisa has her new microwave.
Workbook
163
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
7
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Audioscript
3. 1. b) 2. b)
4.
Visigoth Kingdom
Al-Andalus
When did they arrive?
In the 5th
century
In the 8th
century (711)
How long did they stay?
Three centuries
Seven centuries
What was their language?
Latin
Arabic
What was their religion?
Catholicism
Islam
Name one of their rulers.
Leovigildo
Abd-al-Rahman III
5. a) The cathedral/church was the Christian place for
praying and learning. b) The Visigoth Kingdom had its
capital in Toledo. c) True.
d) The discovery of America put an end to the Middle
Ages. e) Romanesque and Gothic styles developed in the
Christian Kingdoms.
32
BOY 1: Hey, what are you reading about?
BOY 2: Something for school. Listen to this: 'The
Autonomous Community of Andalusia gets its
name from an Empire that lasted from the 8th to
15th centuries.'
BOY 1: Really?
BOY 2: Yes, it was Islamic and their religion was Islam.
BOY 1: Did they speak Arabic, too?
BOY 2: Yes, that was the official language. But people
from other religions also lived there and spoke their
own languages.
6. Muslim invasion: 711 • emirate of Córdoba: 756 •
caliphate of Córdoba: 929 • taifa kingdoms: 1031.
7. Feudalism was the social, economic and political system
of the Early Middle Ages. Agriculture was the main
economic activity. A few feudal lords owned the fiefs.
The peasants worked in the feudal lord’s fiefs and they
were the lord’s serfs.
8. Muslims, Jews and Christians.
9. a) Mudejar Muslims. b) Muladis. c) Mozarabs.
10. a) the Catholic Monarchs. b) the Reconquista.
11. 1. Knighting Ceremony. 2. He knighted knighted the
noblemen. 3. fidelity and military support to the king.
Unit 6
163
Workbook
Audioscript - Unit 6
27
Page 52, activity 1.
TEACHER: OK, children, now say five important
events in the Middle Ages in Spain. One?
BOY: From 409 to 492, the Germanic civilisations
entered the Iberian Peninsula, marking the fall of
the Western Roman Empire.
TEACHER: Great! Two?
GIRL: The discovery of America was in 1492. It
marked the end of the Late Middle Ages.
TEACHER: Sure! Three?
BOY: The Caliphate of Cordoba was established in
929. It was so large that it took up more than
two-thirds of the Iberian Peninsula!
TEACHER: OK! Four?
GIRL: The Reconquista of Spain lasted from 722 to 1492.
TEACHER: Yes! And finally, five!
BOY: The Visigoths created a kingdom on the
Peninsula in 507.
TEACHER: Perfect.
28
Page 53, activity 4.
One ...! They converted to Catholicism under the
kingdom of Recaredo. Two ...! They spoke Latin.
Three! They fought against the barbarians in Gaul.
Four... Their empire in the West ended in 476 AD.
And ... Five! Their last king was Rodrigo.
29
Page 54, activity 8.
If you can all follow me over here, please...
As you can see behind us, the alcázar was a castle
where the caliph lived. For protection, it was always
built on a hill or plateau.
We are here in what was the souk. It was the Muslim
market place. Because it was the most important
social and economic part of the city, it was usually in
the city’s centre.
If you look in front of us, this was the original
Andalusí mosque, can you see the tall minaret tower
on the side? This is the place where Andalusi
Muslims prayed and learned about their religion.
And now if you can follow me here to the right, we
are going to go see the wall that protected the city.
164
Workbook
30
Page 55, activity 9.
TEACHER: OK students, get into your work groups and
study together for tomorrow’s test. You can make it
into a game. One person asks the questions and the
other two students try to be the first to answer
correctly. Does everyone understand what they need
to do?
PUPILS: Yes!
TEACHER: OK, have fun!
BOY: Ok, ready? In what year did the Reconquista
end?
GIRL: 1492!
BOY: Correct!
GIRL: My turn! What were Isabel and Fernando
called?
BOY: The Catholic Kings.
GIRL: Mmm ..., no, the Catholic Monarchs!
BOY: Oh, yes, it’s true! Now it’s my turn! Ready?
What battle did King Pelayo win in 722?
GIRL: Mmm... I don’t know!
BOY: The Battle of Covadonga!
GIRL: I didn’t remember ... OK, my turn again!
The cultural exchange on the Iberian Peninsula was
between which three religions?
BOY: Jews, Muslims and Christians!
GIRL: Correct!
BOY: And my turn again! How long did the
Reconquista take?
GIRL: 7 centuries!
BOY: No! It took 700 years!
TEACHER: Children! You're both correct!
Audioscript
33
164
1. HISTORIA DE LA MÚSICA, MONJES, REYES Y
JUGLARES. Performed by the monks’ choir at
Abadía de San Martín, Beuron. Deutsche
Grammophon, 1997.
2. ALFONSO X EL SABIO, CANTIGAS DE SANTA MARÍA.
STRELA DO MAR. Performed by Capella Reial de
Catalunya Hespèrion XX. Conductor: Jordi Savall.
Astrée, 1993.
Unit 6
Workbook
31
Page 56, activity 11.
BOY: OK, let’s click on this one...
COMPUTER VOICE: King Pelayo was an important
king of Asturias in the 8th century. He’s famous
for winning the Battle of Covadonga in 722
against the Muslims.
BOY: I wonder who this king is ...
COMPUTER VOICE: King Alfonso VI was the king of
Leon during the 11th century. He is famous for his
battles during the Reconquista. His most famous
victory was getting Toledo back from the Muslims
in 1085.
BOY: I know who this is!
COMPUTER VOICE: Queen Isabel I was the queen of
Castilla during the 15th century. She is famous for
being one of the Catholic Monarchs along with her
husband King Fernando. Together, they
completed the Reconquista and helped in the
discovery of America.
BOY: I was right! So, this is the other Catholic
Monarch...
COMPUTER VOICE: King Fernando II was the King
of Aragón during the 15th century. He and his
wife, Isabel I, unified Spain and made it grow with
the discovery of the New World.
32
Page 57, activity 14.
Feudalism was the economic and political system of
the Early Middle Ages. Agriculture was the main
economic activity, but only a few noblemen owned
the land. They were called feudal lords. They
received their land from the king. It was called a fief.
The peasants worked these lands. They were the
lord’s serfs.
33
Page 58, activity 15.
Romanesque churches are not very tall. They have
thick walls and small windows. The walls in
Romanesque churches are covered with colour
paintings inside. These paintings depict different
religious topics. The main feature of Gothic
architecture is the large windows. This means that
Gothic churches are very tall and have thin walls. The
windows in Gothic style have coloured glass
depicting different religious scenes.
Workbook
165
Notes
Unit 6
165
Workbook
Audioscript - Unit 7
34
35
36
166
Page 64, activity 2.
The bourgeoisie became very rich thanks to all the
commerce with the Americas. However, they still did
not have the same privileges as the nobles. Peasants
were very poor and worked as farmers in the
countryside. Nobles had lots of privileges but lost
most of their power to the king. Artisans were very
important to everyday life in the city. Their objects
were not very expensive, though, so they were not
rich. And like the peasants and bourgeoisie, they did
not have any privileges. The clergy still had many
privileges. They often lived in palace-like
monasteries.
Page 66, activity 6.
European colonisers discovered many new foods in
the Americas such as corn and tomatoes. However,
they also took many things to the New World. In
order to eat foods similar to those from home, they
took with them grapes for wine, wheat for bread,
and rice. One thing that the Europeans didn’t know
about before they discovered America was the
potato, and as you know, it became a very popular
food in Europe. The same thing happened with the
cocoa bean, which is the basis of chocolate.
Page 67, activity 8.
BOY: I have to find out about the Monastery of San
Lorenzo for my homework.
GIRL: Really? I have a friend in El Escorial and
I have been there several times. Maybe I can
help you.
BOY: Thanks! I know that it was a king who ordered
its construction, but I don’t remember who. And
I’m not sure if it is not only a monastery but also a
palace.
GIRL: That’s right! It isn’t only a monastery, but also
a royal palace, a church, a library, a royal crypt... It
was Felipe the second who built it in El Escorial,
near Madrid, and he lived there. The palace is
behind the church.
BOY: And is there a garden?
GIRL: Of course, there is a big Renaissance garden
and there was a little separate part only for the
king, connected to the palace.
BOY: OK, so the architectural style of this building is
Renaissance ...
GIRL: Yes, in fact, it is perhaps one of the best
examples of the Spanish Renaissance. You can
see this style in the main façade and the façade of
the church inside the building. The second façade
has the statues of six kings, that’s why it is also
called the courtyard of kings.
BOY: It must be a very symbolic place, I think.
Workbook
GIRL: That’s true! Felipe II also wanted to create a
centre for knowledge and so he gave very old
codices belonging to the Royal Family to the
library. And he commissioned many symbolic
frescos on the walls and ceilings of the Royal
library.
37
Page 68, activity 12.
Baroque art was developed during the seventeenth
century. The style was more popular in Catholic
countries such as Spain. Artists often depicted grand
scenes that told a story. They made figures show
emotions, and sometimes these are depicted in very
dramatic situations. Artists also focused on details
(rich fabrics, wrinkles and hair). This artistic
movement was very interested in the effect of light
on different surfaces.
38
Page 69, activity 14.
GIRL: Hey, Tom, I see you’re finally going to visit
Madrid!
BOY: Yes, but there are so many things to see! I’m
not sure what to do first! I definitely want to see
the Puerta de Alcalá.
GIRL: I agree, that’s probably the most famous of
Madrid’s monuments.
BOY: I also want to go to the Museo del Prado.
GIRL: Great idea! It’s one of the most important
museums in the world. Did you know the building
was originally going to be the Museum of Natural
History?
BOY: Really? Then, I was thinking about the Real
Jardín Botánico.
GIRL: Good idea, it’s next to the Museo del Prado.
You can see plants there that are more than 200
years old! And... why don’t you visit the Real
Academia de la Lengua? I think it could be
interesting for you since you’re studying Spanish.
BOY: Why?
GIRL: Because it’s the main institution related to the
Spanish language. They watch over the correct
use of the Spanish language. Its dictionary is very
famous.
BOY: Is the Retiro Park right next to it?
GIRL: Yes! And if you’re interested in 18th century
buildings, you can visit the National Observatory.
It was first built in the 18th century, and has a big,
old telescope.
BOY: Interesting! And, listen, why were so many of
Madrid’s monuments built in the 18th century?
GIRL: Well, Carlos III reigned during this time, the
Age of Enlightenment. It was a time when
progress and learning were very important.
Notes
Workbook
167
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